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Oct 24, 2021 3:42 PM CST
Name: Jane Joy
Florida (Zone 10a)
Hi
Hi! I made a post awhile ago showing my different cacti, several of which I described as being Opuntia ficus-indica. Now, I am aware that there are many varieties of O. ficus-indica, so I would like to find out what varieties the following individuals could be, if possible. Thanks!
Thumb of 2021-10-24/deadbilly/b7b1c8
Thumb of 2021-10-24/deadbilly/2d0524
Thumb of 2021-10-24/deadbilly/8b36c7
Thumb of 2021-10-24/deadbilly/337e1b
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Oct 24, 2021 4:04 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Why do you think they are all Opuntia ficus-indica?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
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Oct 24, 2021 9:25 PM CST
Name: Jane Joy
Florida (Zone 10a)
Hi
DaisyI said:Why do you think they are all Opuntia ficus-indica?

I guess it is possibly another species, I was assuming based off of the morphology (glochids p much) and how common they are. They could potentially be O. cochenillifera, or something related but O. ficus-indica and O. cochenillifera are the most common around me, other than certain eastern prickly pear species such as O. stricta, but I'm almost certain it is not one of those. I know for sure that the first one is O. ficus-indica, because that is what it was labelled as when I bought it. I suppose I may be able to determine the species' for sure when they flower.
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Oct 24, 2021 9:25 PM CST
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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First one could be, but the others look more like opuntia cochenillifera
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Oct 24, 2021 9:45 PM CST
Name: TJOE
Indonesia
Adeniums Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Keeper of Koi Fruit Growers Container Gardener Composter
Cactus and Succulents Bee Lover Beekeeper Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Those 4 photos look the same species to me
If they look healthy, do nothing
Avatar for Aeonium2003
Oct 25, 2021 9:32 PM CST

Well, it they flower or have fruits, it would help with identification.
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Oct 25, 2021 10:59 PM CST
Name: Jane Joy
Florida (Zone 10a)
Hi
Thanks for all of the comments! I just remembered that the mother plant of the third one shown had small elliptical bright red fruit that tasted pretty good and the fruit had glochids with lots of nearly microscopic spines, so maybe cochenillifera?? Or it could still be ficus-indica..(?)
Avatar for Aeonium2003
Oct 26, 2021 7:43 AM CST

I think it is cochenillifera, its got much longer pads than ficus indica IMO.
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Oct 26, 2021 10:25 AM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
The Opuntia in photo #2 looks a lot like this one posted by @Wildbloomers yesterday. See it? Right side center.

Wildbloomers said:

Thumb of 2021-10-25/Wildbloomers/9a56fa

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
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Oct 26, 2021 5:10 PM CST
Central Florida (Zone 10a)
Adeniums Bookworm Cactus and Succulents Composter Master Gardener: Florida Orchids
@deadbilly. The cactus that @DaisyI referenced is Nopalea cochenillifera. It is relatively common here in Florida and as others have mentioned you will be certain when it flowers as the flowers are distinctive. They are red on this plant and don't open much, likely ant or hummingbird pollinated. The pics in this database show the flowers clearly. I believe that she is correct, the second of your pictures appears to be the same as the ones I have. Although the plants appear similar in your pictures the first one looks like O. ficus-indica to me also quite common here in Florida.
This site uses The Catalogue of Life as the authority in naming and it states that Opuntia cochenillifera is a synonym of Nopalea cochenillifera.
When your plants flower be sure to look at the genus Consolea as well, as they are also found here and are similar looking.
You are correct that your plants are not any of the common low growing Opuntias like stricta that grow around here, yours are going to be trees if you give them enough room.
I hope this was helpful.
Be kind, we all struggle sometimes.
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Oct 26, 2021 5:23 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
I originally thought Consolea and was thinking that's what you had in your photo.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Image
Oct 26, 2021 6:24 PM CST
Central Florida (Zone 10a)
Adeniums Bookworm Cactus and Succulents Composter Master Gardener: Florida Orchids
@DaisyI. Yes, I called that plant Consolea corallicola for years, and then it flowered. These three genera have so many similarities in form, size, variable spines, the way the trunks form etc. The flowers turn out to be the deciding factor.
Be kind, we all struggle sometimes.
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Oct 26, 2021 8:32 PM CST
Name: Jane Joy
Florida (Zone 10a)
Hi
Daisyl said:The Opuntia in photo #2 looks a lot like this one posted by @Wildbloomers yesterday. See it? Right side center.



Wildbloomers said:@deadbilly. The cactus that @DaisyI referenced is Nopalea cochenillifera. It is relatively common here in Florida and as others have mentioned you will be certain when it flowers as the flowers are distinctive. They are red on this plant and don't open much, likely ant or hummingbird pollinated. The pics in this database show the flowers clearly. I believe that she is correct, the second of your pictures appears to be the same as the ones I have. Although the plants appear similar in your pictures the first one looks like O. ficus-indica to me also quite common here in Florida.
This site uses The Catalogue of Life as the authority in naming and it states that Opuntia cochenillifera is a synonym of Nopalea cochenillifera.
When your plants flower be sure to look at the genus Consolea as well, as they are also found here and are similar looking.
You are correct that your plants are not any of the common low growing Opuntias like stricta that grow around here, yours are going to be trees if you give them enough room.
I hope this was helpful.

Yes, I think you are right! thanks so much! Do individuals grown from cuttings usually take a long time to flower regardless of the size? Or should I expect flowers soon? (None of the cuttings I've grown so far have flowered yet).
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Oct 26, 2021 8:37 PM CST
Name: Jane Joy
Florida (Zone 10a)
Hi
Wildbloomers said:@DaisyI. Yes, I called that plant Consolea corallicola for years, and then it flowered. These three genera have so many similarities in form, size, variable spines, the way the trunks form etc. The flowers turn out to be the deciding factor.

Yeah I had no idea that genus even existed until now, they just look like cochenillifera and Brasilopuntia to me.
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