Roses forum: Rose mosaic virus

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Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
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zuzu
Apr 17, 2010 8:15 PM CST

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This is the time of year that rose mosaic virus shows up in my garden on the affected roses. It's actually a catchphrase for several different viruses, but they all look pretty much like this. These are the leaves on a Tropicana rose in my garden. It's about 6 feet tall, with huge canes and an abundance of blooms. It has been growing in my garden for 25 years with no sign of reduced vigor.



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Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses
Clematis Irises Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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zuzu
Apr 17, 2010 8:26 PM CST

Moderator

So, there are some myths I can dispel:

RMV does not kill plants, affect the vigor of plants, or reduce the size or quantity of blooms. People say it sometimes does this, but I suspect something else was the cause, because I have dozens of roses with RMV, most of them for at least 20 years, and it hasn't had this effect on them. I have some duplicates, and there's no difference whatsoever in the quality of the virused and non-virused plants.

RMV does not spread to other roses. Scientists have conducted experiments to try to spread RMV from one rose to another, and they have always failed. RMV is only spread by cuttings. If you take a cutting from an affected rose, the plant that grows from that cutting will have RMV.

RMV is not confined to modern roses or to roses on this continent. Roses from Europe can also have RMV and there's an impressive list of OGR's that don't exist in non-virused form. Rose de Rescht is probably the most frequently cited example. No one has a non-virused Rose de Rescht.

So, unless you insist on perfect foliage, there's no reason to dig up and discard a rose with RMV.
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
Jun 6, 2010 8:32 AM CST
I received one rose from DA roses with exactly the pattern of yellowing depicted above. I sent them a photo and some other photos from the web arguing that it was a form of rose virus and they said, "Nope, not PNRV it's iron/manganese deficiency."

I think they were thinking of the watermark type of pattern that is characteristic of PNRV. But I think it does resemble one of the types.
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
Andi
Jun 16, 2010 12:00 AM CST
I just read an interesting quote on hmf. I know that that site isn't always accurate, but this was posted by Lyn, who I believe is a moderator.

http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.970&tab=32

She claimed that...

Now that I've praised 'Caramella 86' & drawn attention to the fact that it's available from only 1 source, I feel I've an obligation to mention the unfortunate fact that the own-root plant in my present garden is virused. I grew this rose for 3 or 4 years before unmistakable RMV symptoms appeared for the first time in 2006. Since then, symptoms have not returned, but I now know for certain that the plant is infected & that it's only a matter of time before the evidence will resurface. Thus far, the plant's vigor appears normal & bloom production remains high. I grew Caramella for a number of years in a previous garden & do not recall ever encountering signs of RMV -- which, of course, does not mean that the plant was definitely not virused. For what it's worth, I'm almost certain that my first plant was grafted.

Comments from the experts here?
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses
Clematis Irises Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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zuzu
Jun 16, 2010 3:28 AM CST

Moderator

Did you notice that Lyn also said all of the Buck roses are virused? All of them -- grafted and own-root. I wish gardeners would stop worrying so much about RMV. I suppose the virus eventually will be stamped out somehow, but I'll probably be gone by then, so for now I'll just continue to enjoy my roses without worrying about a virus that seems to have little or no effect on my plants.
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
Andi
Jun 16, 2010 6:13 AM CST
I was surprised by that statement, also. I am not certain where she got this information.

I am relieved that the virus doesn't spread by basic garden methods - using the same tools on roses, etc.

Is your Carmella showing any signs of virus?
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
Andi
Jun 16, 2010 6:47 AM CST
Zuzu said in another thread that her carmella was from ru, but has shown no signs of virus.

Last year, I read about lily virus and was inspired to move my tiger lilies to a different garden to be away from my regular lilies. (These are the actual tiger lilies with the little bulbs along the stem not the orange ditch lilies that people call tiger lilies). Tiger lilies can carry the virus and not show symptoms. Lots of "experts" strongly recommended that they be away from oriental lilies. My tiger lily was a "rescue" from an abandoned garden by a fire damaged building barely surviving under piles of lumber and debris. All my other lilies look fine (albeit crowded because they multiplied over the winter). Very few people garden around here. I haven't seen any other lilies in town. I don't think that lily virus is a concern in my garden unless I buy new lilies from a disreputable vendor. It seems that lily virus can be spread by pollinators or garden tools. I have a couple tiger lilies popping up again in the original garden bed near the coral carefree celebration rose. I think they will look nice together, so I am leaving them there this year!

From what I have read, hosta virus seems to be the most easily spread. It also seems to seriously weaken the plant. Two women were talking about hosta virus at the local Lowe's and pointing out plants to the manager - buyer beware, I guess. I didn't get a look at the plants or a chance to talk to the ladies, was in a hurry that day. I only have a few hostas including a huge green variety (perhaps sum and substance) plotting world domination. Have to admire any plant that can grow in deep shade under black walnut trees with little care, but roses are much sexier.

I have only seen pictures of rmv, not the real thing. Most pictures show the yellowing of the leaves, but one site showed "broomstick" growth where the rose foilage was very deformed. Do you encounter mostly the discolored leaves?
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses
Clematis Irises Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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zuzu
Jun 16, 2010 11:49 AM CST

Moderator

You're confusing two different rose ailments, Andi. The "broomstick" growth is caused by Rose Rosette Disease. RRD is contagious and you don't want it in your garden. Those roses have to be destroyed.
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
Andi
Jul 3, 2010 11:31 AM CST
I don't have either now, thank goodness, but thank you for correcting me.

Just Japanese Beetles, but less than last year. I think the preventive Bayer spray program is helping. I am still getting lots with the bug zappers at night.

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