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Avatar for LittleAnnie
Nov 13, 2022 8:09 AM CST
Name: Patricia
Northeast Ohio (Zone 6a)
I've read that some growers, even professionals do this to help the plant focus on strong root growth.
I'm not sure and would love to know what some of you think of this or if you do it with new rose plants. Also, if it is done, how often is it wise or helpful to do this?
Love covers a multitude of sins......thank God!
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Nov 13, 2022 10:15 AM CST
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, New York (Zone 6b)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Photo Contest Winner 2020 Garden Photography Roses Bulbs Peonies
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Region: New York
Presumably this can focus more energy in growing roots, especially on an own-root (non-grafted) rose in its first year in the garden, but I don't do it for two reasons. First, I'm much too impatient to see the beautiful blooms of a new variety that's in its first year in my garden, even if they're small and few! Hilarious! And second, the roots will grow and expand over time whether a rose is disbudded in its first year or not. I simply let nature takes its course.
Avatar for LittleAnnie
Nov 13, 2022 11:11 AM CST
Name: Patricia
Northeast Ohio (Zone 6a)
I share your impatience to see the blooms and bury my face in the fragrance if it's there when the plant is new. One of the things I miss most in not having roses, besides the beauty of the bloom, is the fragrance and Jacqueline du Pre was my favorite scent. It was intoxicating.

Thank you, Mike. From reading in here I see you always have great advice.
Love covers a multitude of sins......thank God!
Last edited by LittleAnnie Nov 15, 2022 6:54 AM Icon for preview
Avatar for SusaninSB
Nov 13, 2022 10:07 PM CST
Santa Barbara, CA (Zone 9b)
The only time I'd do that is if I had a really tiny band that needed to grow up a lot. I'd let the first bud bloom to make sure it's the right variety (especially if you order from RVR!), but then I'd disbud the rest until the plant grew bigger. Any gallon rose I get from Heirloom or Roses Unlimited, I let bloom away with abandon. Here's recent example from my garden: I trade rare/out-of-commerce roses with fellow collectors. I finally got a rooted cutting of one that's very hard to root, and it's growing slowly in its 6 inch pot. It recently formed a bud, but I disbudded it to direct the energy into the plant growing, so I can send it to my friend sooner than later. But that's an extreme example.
Avatar for LittleAnnie
Nov 14, 2022 8:56 AM CST
Name: Patricia
Northeast Ohio (Zone 6a)
That makes sense, especially, letting one bud bloom, Susan and I may do that if I get bands this spring and the plant is tiny. I think I'm getting gallons from Angel Gardens and know I am from Heirloom and Northland sends bands. Pam from A.G. is propagating Jubilee Celebration for me so I can have it on it's own roots, so, that one may be small, too.
Thanks for your reply. Smiling
Love covers a multitude of sins......thank God!
Avatar for RpR
Nov 14, 2022 11:45 AM CST
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
I always debud roses, and veggie plants such tomatoes, chiles etc. ; it has been written to do so for longer than I have been alive (Mom had Rose Society magazines, saved from very early on) and they said so back then.

It is to each , his own, there are no Rose Police. I tip my hat to you.
Avatar for LittleAnnie
Nov 15, 2022 7:00 AM CST
Name: Patricia
Northeast Ohio (Zone 6a)
RpR said: I always debud roses, and veggie plants such tomatoes, chiles etc. ; it has been written to do so for longer than I have been alive (Mom had Rose Society magazines, saved from very early on) and they said so back then.

It is to each , his own, there are no Rose Police. I tip my hat to you.


I never thought to do this with tomatoes. We both have rather short growing seasons, so, when my tomatoes flower I'm so happy I'm ready to throw a party.

BTW, I thought the flower had to do with pollination of the tomato. Wouldn't taking it off produce less tomatoes in the open pollinated ones?
Love covers a multitude of sins......thank God!
Avatar for RpR
Nov 15, 2022 12:09 PM CST
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
LittleAnnie said: I never thought to do this with tomatoes. We both have rather short growing seasons, so, when my tomatoes flower I'm so happy I'm ready to throw a party.

BTW, I thought the flower had to do with pollination of the tomato. Wouldn't taking it off produce less tomatoes in the open pollinated ones?

I only do it with a new plant, so it does not try to produce fruit and send out roots at the same time.
OR
If you want larger tomatoes, usually for Fair honors.
Avatar for LittleAnnie
Nov 15, 2022 3:17 PM CST
Name: Patricia
Northeast Ohio (Zone 6a)
RpR said: I only do it with a new plant, so it does not try to produce fruit and send out roots at the same time.
OR
If you want larger tomatoes, usually for Fair honors.


Ok, I understand why remove the flowers on tomatoes now. Same as removing all the buds on a rose but one or two so you have a larger rose.
Love covers a multitude of sins......thank God!
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Nov 15, 2022 5:27 PM CST
Name: Elena
Cincinnati, OH (Zone 6a)
Usus est optĭmus magister.
Garden Photography Cat Lover Dog Lover Organic Gardener Roses
RpR, interesting…I am fairly new to roses, but consider myself experienced in growing veggies. I usually remove only corona buds in pepper and eggplants. For rooting tomatoes I do not watering them after planting seedling for about 10 days to let root system develop by looking for a water deep in ground.
Sorry for off topic.😎
“….the world will be saved by beauty.”
Avatar for Sandsock
Nov 21, 2022 5:13 PM CST
Name: aka Annie
WA-rural 8a to (Zone 7b)
LittleAnnie Heirloom is supposed to be sending you good sized roses in 1 gallon pots. That is their claim to fame, bigger ownroot roses like Antique Roes Emporium. Northland, RVR and High Country Roses send bands.
Avatar for LittleAnnie
Nov 22, 2022 8:59 AM CST
Name: Patricia
Northeast Ohio (Zone 6a)
Sandsock said: LittleAnnie Heirloom is supposed to be sending you good sized roses in 1 gallon pots. That is their claim to fame, bigger ownroot roses like Antique Roes Emporium. Northland, RVR and High Country Roses send bands.


I did find that out when ordering, but, still, wanted to ask the question because I haven't grown roses for almost 30 years. Much information is available now that I didn't know when I used to grow them, and so I wanted to know if it was something most folks in here did and was it really helpful to the plant or not. You can read about a subject from so called experts, but, hearing from different people who have much more experience than me on that subject can be important information.
Angel Gardens also sends gallons, but, since she is propagating JC for me it might be on the small side, plus, I've heard it can be wimpy on it's own roots.
Love covers a multitude of sins......thank God!
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