Ask a Question forum: Invasive purple bell flower.

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727lucky
Jul 14, 2013 6:19 AM CST
How do get rid of this very invasive bell flower takes over my whole garden nothing kills this monster?
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
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Dutchlady1
Jul 14, 2013 6:24 AM CST
Welcome! 727 lucky! Do you have a picture by any chance?

727lucky
Jul 14, 2013 6:40 AM CST
No photo,it has a long stem purple flowers roots go many ways very long tap root I have seen these plants a long highways and in fields don't know how in got in my gardens.but don't want it to spread digging doesn't work round-up does nothing.hope you can help Thank you
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
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plantladylin
Jul 14, 2013 8:22 AM CST
727lucky:

First ..... Welcome!

Where do you live, what state? I've heard that this Campanula (Bellflower) can be invasive but I have no clue if this is the plant you are referring to or how to get rid of them:

Creeping Bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides).

http://www.restoringthelandscape.com/2010/08/thats-invasive-...

http://wimastergardener.org/?q=CreepingBellflower

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campanula_rapunculoides

~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~

727lucky
Jul 14, 2013 9:36 AM CST
I live in Chicago area and yes that is Campanula Rapunculoides,but can't get all the roots out so it keeps spreading.thank you anyway guess I will keep digging.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
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RoseBlush1
Jul 14, 2013 2:50 PM CST
I don't know how many plants you need to attack, but poison oak grows very much the same way you have described for your companula. They way I get rid of them, is to cut back the main plant, swab the stem with alcohol because PO emits a sap as soon as it it cut, paint it with concentrated round up and cover it with a black plastic bag for the summer. Not attractive, but it does kill the plant and all of the roots it spreads out.

I only have used this method on PO because I am highly allergic. Good grief, you should see me when I go after the PO. It looks like I am wearing a hazmat suit. I don't dare let it get started in my garden. Each year, the birds do their part to start new plants.

Smiles,
Lyn
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
[Last edited by RoseBlush1 - Jul 14, 2013 7:40 PM (+)]
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Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
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valleylynn
Jul 15, 2013 12:20 PM CST
Another thing I learned recently is to add dawn dish soap to your Roundup. About a tablespoon per gallon on spray. Many of these plants have a protective coating that keeps the spray from penetrating to the leaf. The dish soap breaks down that barrier.

Some times you need to make a solution of Roundup and Crossbow, with the added dishsoap. You can spray our paint it onto the offending plant.
Name: Evan
Pioneer Valley south, MA, USA (Zone 6a)
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eclayne
Jul 15, 2013 12:51 PM CST

Plants Admin

I hadn't realized just how tenacious this plant is. If herbicides like Roundup only kill down to the fibrous roots but not the taproot, it sounds like a multiyear campaign is required to deplete it.
Evan
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
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woofie
Jul 15, 2013 12:55 PM CST
And that's odd, because Roundup will certainly take out other unpleasant weeds with taproots. Although, come to think of it, the hollyhock I doused with Roundup came back. Grrrrr. But it's definitely smaller.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Evan
Pioneer Valley south, MA, USA (Zone 6a)
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eclayne
Jul 15, 2013 1:41 PM CST

Plants Admin

I wonder if it's strictly size? Dandelions are supposed to be no problem.
Evan
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
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RoseBlush1
Jul 15, 2013 4:50 PM CST
The method I wrote about above about getting rid of poison oak works for three reasons. One the Round Up, but it needs to be applied during the active growth period of the plant, and because the black plastic bag deprives the plant of any light for photosynthesis, and if the bag is secure, the stump ends up being cooked to death from the high temps in my summer garden. I've never had to go back a re-treat a plant.

You can tweak the process by soaking a cloth in the concentrated Roundup and securing it tightly around the stump you have left and then putting the bag over the whole thing.

The birds usually "plant" the seeds for PO up on the slope, so I generally take two bags up with me for the whole process. It's almost as if I sneak up on the plant, bag it, cut it, treat the stump and bag the remaining stump and haul the bush/vine part off in the first bag. This is war.

If the root system is as you described (I haven't grown it) it, is the kind of plant that if the roots are broken in any way, it signals them to push up more top growth right at that spot ... very much like the roots of the rose 'Dr. Huey' which is supposed to be almost impossible to get rid of once established. I've used the same method on good ol' Dr. H. and it works with one try.

Smiles,
Lyn
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
[Last edited by RoseBlush1 - Jul 15, 2013 6:52 PM (+)]
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Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
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Leftwood
Jul 17, 2013 8:03 PM CST
The roots of several invasive campanula species make them particularly dificult. The smallest pieces severed from the mother plant will begin a new life as another plant. It is impossible to manually remove all the roots. Any plant with a large root system will require multiple applications of Round up. When the poison is taken in, it is eventually distributed throughout the plant and roots. If there is a lot of root mass, the concentration of the poison becomes lower than the threshold needed to kill the plant. That is why one often sees a hard to kill plant sprayed with Round up go downhill at first, then seems to perk up in a week or two. More of the poison (a second application) is then needed to reach the killing concentration threshold. Remember you need to apply all chemicals according to directions, or you can't expect them to work as claimed. Doubling up on the Round up in one application will not work, and is a very bad idea to toy with anything that one does not know the consequences of.

Is light deprivation an option?
Name: Calin
Weston-super-mare UK (Zone 7b)
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fixpix
Jul 23, 2013 12:00 AM CST
I have that pest Adenophora (looks a lot like campanula, but i guess it's a bit different).
I had a 2 x 2 m area with lots of plants. All I did was spend a lot of time, digging the soil with a spade (the one designed for going deep in the soil, pointed, not used for removing soil) and in each"slice of dirt" I carefully searched for all tiny roots and so on.
So far, a few months later, I haven't seen new ones. I am thinking they are not all gone, but I am sure this method works - with a lot of patience, and for small areas.

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