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Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Sep 6, 2013 2:35 PM CST
I would like to encourage the membership to use the comments section of an individual plant to note how/when you fertilize it, and what after-care you do when the blooms are spent. That second part is often totally missing from garden books and I'm never quite sure if a drastic cut-it-to-the-ground is warranted, shearing, or time-consuming deadheading. I sometimes make note of what I do each season, but more often not. Other times I shear halfway then end up cutting to the ground when that looks ratty, so why not just do one step? I do realize this after-care may vary from region to region, and some plants can be dealt with in more than one way. I'm always reluctant for the full-blown slash-and-burn because of the huge hole I end up with, and wonder how others manage their plants in the awkward stages. Perhaps include a note on how quickly they recover? Some look really horrible after shearing, then boom, two weeks later they have re-sprouted for a softer look.
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Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
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chelle
Sep 7, 2013 9:35 AM CST
I agree

The few times I've run across information of this sort in the plant comments area, it's been very helpful. I haven't really been one to shear back a lot of my plants mid-season, but I've been experimenting a bit more this year.

Other info is nice to have too; like the fact that Limelight Salvia, grown in zone 5b/6, is now a huge bush but still hasn't produced a single bloom. I would never have chosen it had I known this. IMHO, knowing the area that the Poster gardens in would be crucial to making an informed decision based on their comments, and that information is sometimes missing.
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Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Sep 7, 2013 11:17 AM CST
I agree, Chelle, that the location is important. If a member is reluctant to add that to their profile, they could just note in the comment section their general region and zone. I tend to let plants get really ratty before I decide something needs to be done, and often think if I just had done something sooner, it would not leave such a gaping brown hole. Feverfew is one of those, I think I should shear that back to about 4" when it first starts going to seed, but it doesn't look THAT bad until one day it DOES look that bad, and then I cut it back hard and it looks dead and parched and terrible, but right now as I look out the window it has about 6" of new growth and looks fine. Maybe if I shear it sooner I would get a second bloom? (Pacific Northwest)
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.

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