Daylilies forum: Daylily Problem

Views: 1166, Replies: 19 » Jump to the end
(Zone 8b)
Image
SouthernLa
Nov 30, 2013 12:17 PM CST
Could anyone tell me what may be going on here? Thanks!


Thumb of 2013-11-30/SouthernLa/308b2d

(Zone 8b)
Image
SouthernLa
Nov 30, 2013 12:19 PM CST
Guess I should have mentioned what I've done and not done lately to the bed they're in.

Haven't sprayed fungicide in a month. Did work alfalfa around the plants about 2 weeks ago... Haven't applied liquid fertilizer in 2 months.

[Last edited by SouthernLa - Nov 30, 2013 12:20 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #519528 (2)
Name: Julie
Roanoke, VA (Zone 7a)
Daylilies Region: Virginia Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Heucheras Cat Lover Hummingbirder
Clematis Lilies Birds Garden Art Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
floota
Nov 30, 2013 12:57 PM CST
Your leaf appears to have some kind of chlorosis going on, which means your soil likely has a deficiency in some nutrient the plant needs. One of the most common kinds of chlorosis I've seen in daylilies is iron chlorosis, which often occurs in soils with PH that is too high. Applications of iron chelate can be helpful if it is an iron deficiency, but the first thing I'd suggest if possible is that you do a soil test to determine the exact problem. There are some self tests of soil that can be ordered, I believe.

Yellowing can also come from other pathogens or drainage problems, so those need to be ruled out first also. Good luck!


(Zone 8b)
Image
SouthernLa
Nov 30, 2013 2:26 PM CST
Thanks so much for responding... I ran to the store after I posted this and bought a test kit. I'm having to let the soil dry a little more but I did test the ph already. It seems its a little darker than what the 7.0 reading is and not as dark as the 8.0...

What is the best way to help lower it this time of year? Could I try an acid loving miracle grow?

And yes, I am going to be sending off a soil sample to the county agent.. I never would have thought my ph would be high.
[Last edited by SouthernLa - Nov 30, 2013 2:53 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #519575 (4)
Name: Julie
Roanoke, VA (Zone 7a)
Daylilies Region: Virginia Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Heucheras Cat Lover Hummingbirder
Clematis Lilies Birds Garden Art Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
floota
Nov 30, 2013 4:18 PM CST
I would wait to find out what elements are lacking before applying anything. However, I am no expert at this ( only am relying on personal experiences) and there are many in this group who are better equipped to answer such questions. I have added various elements to improve the soil over the years. Iron chelate is readily available, and I have added that to improve iron deficiencies. Magnesium Sulfate (Epsom salts) is good to apply to soil around roses, and this can also help if your soil has a magnesium deficiency. Epsom salts are good because they usually don't change the soil PH.
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
Birds Butterflies Container Gardener Hummingbirder Garden Ideas: Level 2 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
tink3472
Nov 30, 2013 7:00 PM CST
SouthernLa said:

What is the best way to help lower it this time of year? Could I try an acid loving miracle grow?



If it is actually too high then I would add sulfur to the soil
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
[Last edited by tink3472 - Dec 1, 2013 10:10 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #519646 (6)
Name: Fred Manning
Lillian Alabama

Charter ATP Member Region: Gulf Coast I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Seller of Garden Stuff Dog Lover Region: United States of America
Ponds Hummingbirder Daylilies Container Gardener Butterflies Birds
Image
spunky1
Dec 1, 2013 6:25 AM CST
Welcome SouthernLa, here on the Gulf Coast we have to add lime every year.
(Zone 8b)
Image
SouthernLa
Dec 1, 2013 3:06 PM CST
I do have another question. I added alfalfa pellets and osmocote around the daylilies and disturbed the area some... could the alfalfa have gotten hot? Should I panic or should I wait and see what the results are?

Thanks a million for the feedback!
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
Birds Butterflies Container Gardener Hummingbirder Garden Ideas: Level 2 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
tink3472
Dec 1, 2013 6:07 PM CST
I wouldn't worry too much about the alfalfa. I add alfalfa in the hole and around the plants then top dress with it every fall after I have already added to the beds a few weeks before planting without a problem. I would wait and see what the results are before jumping to too many conclusions.

One thing I did last year when the ph was too high in several beds was mix the garden sulfur you use for hydrangeas with water and poured in the beds for a quick lowering of the ph. I don't know if it actually helps lower it fast or not but it seemed to do the trick in a couple of weeks.


Please don't panic Smiling Your daylilies aren't going to die overnight so just be patient and wait and see what the results are of your test.
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
Name: Doris&David Bishop
Cartersville, Ga. (Zone 7b)
Daylilies Cat Lover Clematis Region: Georgia Garden Art
Image
Casshigh
Dec 1, 2013 7:13 PM CST
Tink, Fred, et. al.,
I keep reading all of these things about alfalfa "going through a heat" as it breaks down, on this forum and others. Does anyone know how long this heat lasts, and how many degrees it gets to while going through this process? Does it depend on soil temperatures, moisture present, or other factors? If we ever had any root damage, it must have been offset by the benefits of alfalfa. It is one of the cheaper additives we will put in planting holes and around our daylilies for a long time. I think Tommy Maddox has stock in some alfalfa company, as he swears by it. We are always looking for some way to improve our flowers, especially if it's easy to apply and cheap. Thanks in advance for all of the information you all contribute.
Spanky, Friend of Alfalfa

David
"Anything worth doing is worth overdoing"~~~David Bishop
http://daylilyfans.com/bishop/
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
Birds Butterflies Container Gardener Hummingbirder Garden Ideas: Level 2 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
tink3472
Dec 1, 2013 9:08 PM CST
I really have no idea how hot it actually gets and how long it lasts. I don't think it heats up too much as I have taken the alfalfa that is breaking down that is "hot" and held it in my hand with fist closed and it's not hot enough to burn my hand so unless you are sitting your plant bare root on top of a pile of alfalfa then I would say it's not going to cause much damage if any. Here the alfalfa breaks down pretty quickly since we water daily. The last load of pine bark we got in has been hotter than any heat I have felt from the alfalfa.

I would also think that it would depend on soil temps, moisture, and other things. Alfalfa will take longer to break down in dryer soil than in soil that is watered daily or often so it may put out more heat. I believe Tommy had said somewhere (maybe when he was at our club speaking) that after he puts down alfalfa he waters it in for about 6 hours to help break it down. he might of been saying that about something else I really can't remember.
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
Name: James
South Bend, IN (Zone 5b)
Hostas Enjoys or suffers cold winters Birds Seed Starter Annuals Region: Indiana
Region: United States of America Dog Lover Daylilies Container Gardener Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
JWWC
Dec 1, 2013 9:47 PM CST
My understanding is that lime is alkaline and will raise the pH (lower the acidity) of the soil.

http://hubcap.clemson.edu/~blpprt/acidity2_review.html
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
Birds Butterflies Container Gardener Hummingbirder Garden Ideas: Level 2 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
tink3472
Dec 1, 2013 10:11 PM CST
[quote="JWWC"]My understanding is that lime is alkaline and will raise the pH (lower the acidity) of the soil.

]http://hubcap.clemson.edu/~blpprt/acidity2_review.html[/quot...

Yes yes you are correct *Blush* . I edited my post above, it should have said sulfur, not lime.
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
Name: Glen Ingram
Macleay Is, Qld, Australia (Zone 12a)
Kaspar-scourge of daylily seedlings
Region: Australia Annuals Canning and food preservation Herbs Tropicals Foliage Fan
Plays in the sandbox Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Hybridizer Composter Sedums
Image
Gleni
Dec 2, 2013 3:34 AM CST
I find kitty litter made from waste plantation timber can get hot in decomposing. It also expands enormously if it already hasn't because of kitty waste. I have never had any problems from it touching the stems. The earthworms get into it quickly but if it gets too dry it acts as mulch anyway. Looking at Michele's plants and their growth rate, however, I am thinking of selling the ragdolls for proper fertiliser.
Even so, I have great flowering.
Name: Fred Manning
Lillian Alabama

Charter ATP Member Region: Gulf Coast I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Seller of Garden Stuff Dog Lover Region: United States of America
Ponds Hummingbirder Daylilies Container Gardener Butterflies Birds
Image
spunky1
Dec 2, 2013 6:47 AM CST
When I plant a daylily I put a handful of alfalfa and chicken litter in the hole, mix it in the soil as I make the mound to sit the daylily on. After planting I top dress with the same thing plus slow release and have never had a problem with heat. I do most of my planting in boxes and one thing I look for is worms, if I have lots of worms then the soil is in good condition and the worms are also feeding the daylilies. This is also a good sign in the seedling beds that are in the ground. Worms love alfalfa.
Name: James
South Bend, IN (Zone 5b)
Hostas Enjoys or suffers cold winters Birds Seed Starter Annuals Region: Indiana
Region: United States of America Dog Lover Daylilies Container Gardener Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
JWWC
Dec 2, 2013 7:37 AM CST
tink3472 said:

Yes yes you are correct *Blush* . I edited my post above, it should have said sulfur, not lime.


No worries! You've helped me a ton - I was just returning the favor. Thumbs up

Plus I wouldn't want her to add lime only to find out that she raised the pH making nutrients even less available to the plants.
(Zone 8b)
Image
SouthernLa
Jan 9, 2014 3:43 PM CST
Okay guys and gals... The results are in from the soil test...

PH 7.03 High
Phosphorus Very High
Potassium Low
Calcium Very High
Magnesium Very High
Sodium Optimum
Sulfur Low
Copper High
Zinc High

So, what do I do now? I would hate to dig all the daylilies up to treat. How would you treat for the PH? Potassium and sulfur? Thanks for any and all responses!!
Name: Brian
Ontario Canada (Zone 5b)
Image
bearsearch
Jan 10, 2014 9:01 AM CST
Gleni said:I find kitty litter made from waste plantation timber can get hot in decomposing. It also expands enormously if it already hasn't because of kitty waste. I have never had any problems from it touching the stems. The earthworms get into it quickly but if it gets too dry it acts as mulch anyway. Looking at Michele's plants and their growth rate, however, I am thinking of selling the ragdolls for proper fertiliser.
Even so, I have great flowering.


I would be very cautious with the use of USED kitty litter! Not because of any potential problems for the plants but health problems for you! Dog and cat litter are known to contain pathogens that are harmful and in some cases deadly to humans, and should not be used in gardens. Dried litter that may become aerosolized and inhaled can cause severe respiratory infections. If you are going to use it I would suggest wearing good rubber gloves AND a mask! I work in an intensive care unit and have looked after a few people who have had pneumonia a from cat litter and not all survived.
Name: Julie
Roanoke, VA (Zone 7a)
Daylilies Region: Virginia Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Heucheras Cat Lover Hummingbirder
Clematis Lilies Birds Garden Art Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
floota
Jan 10, 2014 10:37 AM CST
I copied comments ( below) from an online source. It looks as if you need to start by lowering your soil PH, and that should help with all of the other trace elements, most of which are also high. I use a compost pile and turn it periodically and add organic material to the soil from the compost. Other organic which might be of help if you don't have a compost pile : ( aged manure, mushroom compost, peat moss, etc.I've used all of these before.) Also, my local nursery has a mix they call "soil conditioner" which is a mix of topsoil and old mulches mixed together. It makes wonderful loam but isn't super cheap. I've had them deliver truckloads of this to build raised beds here - we have red clay.

In a nutshell: Your best option is to add organic matter and grow plants that do well in alkaline soils.

The whole story: Technically, all soils with a pH higher than 7.0 are alkaline, or "sweet," but most garden plants tolerate a pH up to about 7.5. Alkaline soils are generally composed of basic (high pH) parent materials such as limestone (calcium carbonate). High-pH soils are more prevalent in arid climates, because rainfall does not leach the calcium and other basic materials out of the soil. Soil pH affects nutrient availability for plants, and in soils with a pH over 7.8, iron, zinc, and phosphorus deficiencies are common.

Lowering soil pH is a slow and challenging process. "The truth is, lowering soil pH is hard, because the limestone in the soil continually dissolves," says Jessica
Davis, Ph.D., a professor of soil science at Colorado State University. Davis recommends getting your soil tested to determine its pH, lime content, soil texture, and mineral and nutrient content. If the test results indicate a medium or high lime content, she recommends not trying aggressive measures to lower the soil pH.

The most aggressive way to lower soil pH is to apply pure sulfur or flowers of sulfur. You should follow your soil test's recommendations, but in general, if you are applying sulfur to an area that does not currently have any plants growing in it, such as a new garden bed, you can apply it at a higher rate than in areas with growing plants. You can also add organic matter, such as compost or composted manure, to your soil annually and mulch with acidic organic mulches, such as pine needles. Adding organic matter slowly lowers your pH over time, while increasing microbial life and improving the structure of your soil.
Name: Glen Ingram
Macleay Is, Qld, Australia (Zone 12a)
Kaspar-scourge of daylily seedlings
Region: Australia Annuals Canning and food preservation Herbs Tropicals Foliage Fan
Plays in the sandbox Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Hybridizer Composter Sedums
Image
Gleni
Jan 10, 2014 4:33 PM CST
Thanks Brian. I will definitely take that on board!!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Daylilies forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Lilium 'Pink Perfection'"