Daylilies forum→Ron Reimer's 2015 Introductions

Page 2 of 3 • 1 2 3
Views: 4196, Replies: 42 » Jump to the end
Name: pam
gainesville fl (Zone 8b)
Bee Lover Hummingbirder Dragonflies Native Plants and Wildflowers Enjoys or suffers hot summers Daylilies
Butterflies The WITWIT Badge Birds Pollen collector
Image
gardenglory
Oct 12, 2014 2:49 PM CST
I found it now, I was trying, got blue eyes, and it didnt bring up anything. Whatever it calls itself, that is one great flower. I just love its background.
Name: Tina
Where the desert meets the sea (Zone 9b)
Daylilies Container Gardener Dog Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers hot summers Garden Ideas: Level 2
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
chalyse
Oct 15, 2014 10:33 AM CST
Just learned that Ron only plans on hybridizing for 3-4 more years, so his unique introductions will be quite "limited edition" runs, most likely. Fortunately, it sounds like there may be some more semi- and evergreens, as well as dormants, in those years.
Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of old; seek what those of old sought. — Basho

Daylilies that thrive? click here! Thumbs up
Name: Brian Reeder
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Patience is the Reward of Patience
Image
onagadori
Oct 16, 2014 4:55 PM CST
Hello Everyone,

I just noticed this thread about Ron's new introductions. I have known Ron for a few years and now and can tell you that his methodologies are very good. I wrote a two-part interview/blog series on his hybridizing program back in the winter of 2012/13. For any of you who would like to know about the background of his program, or more about his program in general, you can check the entries at http://www.daylilybreeder.blog... In honor of Ron's new introductions, I have bumped the first part of the series back up to the top spot on my blog, so you can find it easily without having to search for it and the second part is linked at both the top and bottom of the part-one entry. As well, there are links to Ron's website where you can find his lovely new introductions. For those interested in rust resistance or breeding for resistance in general, there is also a series of thirteen posts from last winter on that subject at my blog. Just look through the blog archives in the right hand column. The resistance breeding series began in November 2013.

While Ron's patterns are astonishing, my very favorite of his seedlings, and now introductions, is Ethereal Lavender.

I noticed someone in the above thread asked about Ron's work with tetraploids. Unfortunately, he doesn't work with tets, only with dips, but I would suspect there is some very fertile ground amongst Ron's dip intros for someone who might want to convert any of them to tetraploids...

Best,

Brian Reeder
Name: Teresa Felty Barrow
South central KY (Zone 6b)
Consider the lilies of the field
Seller of Garden Stuff Hostas Region: Kentucky Lilies Peonies Region: United States of America
Garden Photography Vegetable Grower Hybridizer Bulbs Irises Hummingbirder
Image
bluegrassmom
Oct 16, 2014 5:45 PM CST
Hello, Brian

Welcome to All Things Plants. Lots of information, good pics and avid gardeners on these forums. I am located just west of Bowling Green, Ky. Are you a daylily collector? I am, but also grow a variety of other perennials. Welcome!

Teresa
Bee Kind, make the world a better place.
Name: Tina
Where the desert meets the sea (Zone 9b)
Daylilies Container Gardener Dog Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers hot summers Garden Ideas: Level 2
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
chalyse
Oct 17, 2014 4:30 AM CST
Brian is another daylily hybridizer working on breeding toward resistance, and providing documentation to guide others, like Ron. He's linked his informative blogspot website above. It also has a nice page of some of Brian Mahieu's cultivars he is growing. Nice to see you here, Brian R! Any chance we might enjoy some of your own seedlings introduced in upcoming seasons?
Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of old; seek what those of old sought. — Basho

Daylilies that thrive? click here! Thumbs up
Name: Maurice
Grey County, Ontario (Zone 4b)
Image
admmad
Oct 17, 2014 8:16 AM CST
Betja said:Now that I really don't understand -- I type it in exactly as the registration shows, and every time it says "No Results Found" ??? What am I doing wrong?


Betty, you are not doing anything wrong. The AHS database search has 'bugs' in handling apostrophes. I have reported one bug on more than one occasion.

In this case the 'bug' is annoyingly simple.

If you are like me, when you type in a search with an apostrophe you use the ' key on the right side of the keyboard near the return key and type this,
Baby's Got Blue Eyes

But the AHS search database displays the name like this, Baby’s Got Blue Eyes. If one looks very carefully one can see that they are not the same character.
I put them together below to help show the difference:

Baby's Got Blue Eyes (1)
Baby’s Got Blue Eyes (2)

One can look at the ascii code values for the two characters. The typed one from the keyboard is 27H and the one displayed by the database is 92H.

If one does a search using Baby's copied and pasted from (1) [keyboard] above one gets:

"Search Results
2 daylilies found.
(showing 1 to 2) Page 1 of 1

Daylily Baby's Blush Baby's Blush (Carter-M., 1999)
height 29in (74cm), bloom 6in (15.0cm), season M, Semi-Evergreen, Tetraploid, 13 buds, 2 branches, Rose pink with pink eye and watermark above green throat. (Trudy Harris × Pink Serenade)

Baby's Caress (Lovett-J., 2004)
height 24in (61cm), bloom 5in (12.5cm), season EM, Rebloom, Semi-Evergreen, Tetraploid, Pink with slightly lighter edge above yellow green throat. ((Untamed Glory × Sherry Lane Carr) × Absolute Treasure) "

If one does a search using Baby’s copied and pasted from (2) [as present in the database for this cultivar] above one gets:

"Search Results
1 daylilies found.
(showing 1 to 1) Page 1 of 1

Daylily Baby’s Got Blue Eyes Baby’s Got Blue Eyes (Gossard-D., 2013)
height 32in (81cm), bloom 5in (12.5cm), season M, Rebloom, Dormant, Tetraploid, Fragrant, 18 buds, 4 branches, Double 98%, Cream white with a patterned blue, purple, maroon eyezone, above a very green throat. (((Tet. Crystal Blue Persuasion × (((Joe Marinello × Custard Candy) × Tet. Wings of Chance) × Tet. In the Navy)) × Blue Beetle) "

The word Daylily and the duplicated cultivar name occurs when there is a photograph of the cultivar.

It appears that some apostrophes in cultivar names in the database are one character and other apostrophes in cultivar names are the other character.
Maurice
[Last edited by admmad - Oct 17, 2014 8:17 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #718532 (6)
Name: Betty
Bakersfield, CA
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Birds The WITWIT Badge Region: United States of America Roses
Irises Cat Lover Daylilies Region: California Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
Betja
Oct 17, 2014 9:02 AM CST
Thank you Maurice! After looking more than once I finally could see the difference and realize you're right. I think Julie's suggestion for finding correct names is a good one -- but I can't help but wonder if it might be possible to resolve this with a programming solution linking the two different apostrophes. Just a thought...



Betty
[Last edited by Betja - Oct 17, 2014 9:14 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #718550 (7)
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
Region: Texas Garden Research Contributor Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Permaculture
Raises cows Beekeeper Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
dave
Oct 17, 2014 9:16 AM CST

Garden.org Admin

Another tip: every daylily in the ATP database links to the same cultivar in the AHS database. So if you find the cultivar here at ATP you can then click on the AHS link to see it there.

Example:

Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Baby's Got Blue Eyes')

Go there and you'll see the AHS link at the top of that page.
Name: Brian Reeder
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Patience is the Reward of Patience
Image
onagadori
Oct 17, 2014 9:46 AM CST
Hi, Bluegrassmom and Chalyse

Thanks for your replies to my post. I have been using ATP and lurking around here for a long time, but wanted to let everyone know more about Ron's program so thought it was time to join. I don't get to post anywhere much or even communicate much with others because I stay so busy (just ask Maurice (Admmad on here) if you don't believe me - he is one of my favorite people to talk daylilies with and I have been out of touch with him for at least two years now - good to see you here Maurice!), but I am trying to be more social and less single-focused these days Smiling In addition to daylilies (which are my #1 focus these days), I also work with/breed peony, hosta, hellebores, heuchera, the occasional magnolia cross and a few poultry as well as growing 17 species of bamboo, in addition to writing my blog and keeping all kinds of notes on my various projects, so there are never enough hours in the day... Bluegrassmom, to learn more about me, check out my 'About Me' page at my blog and read the first entry to my resistance breeding series under November 2013 in the blog archive column to the left.

Chalyse, thanks for catching Bluegrassmom up on my work with daylilies. I appreciate it! I am probably still a few years out on introductions,, though I do have two or three I am observing closely and they may only be a couple years out. Only time will tell.

Best,

Brian
[Last edited by onagadori - Oct 17, 2014 9:46 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #718568 (9)
Name: Tina
Where the desert meets the sea (Zone 9b)
Daylilies Container Gardener Dog Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers hot summers Garden Ideas: Level 2
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
chalyse
Oct 17, 2014 10:24 AM CST
Really enjoy seeing your seedlings, Brian; so many of them have their own unique looks, like Ron's! Would you say that there are a number of resistant generations in both your two hybridizer's lines that go back some 2-3 decades of observation and selection (seeding x seedling x seedling, x seedling...an on)? I can only imagine the time and effort; well spent for such lovely results.
Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of old; seek what those of old sought. — Basho

Daylilies that thrive? click here! Thumbs up
Name: Pat
Near McIntosh, Florida (Zone 9a)
Image
Xenacrockett
Oct 17, 2014 2:48 PM CST
Welcome! Brian,

Great to have you here.

Question: You used "Always Afternoon" in your rust resistant breeding which is curious since my experience is she was very rusty here?
She is on my list of plants to put in the "rust coliseum" next year.
Did JKO combination counter rust in some way?
[Last edited by Xenacrockett - Oct 17, 2014 2:49 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #718707 (11)
Name: Brian Reeder
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Patience is the Reward of Patience
Image
onagadori
Oct 17, 2014 5:47 PM CST
Hi, Chalyse and Xenacrockett

Chalyse wrote - Really enjoy seeing your seedlings, Brian; so many of them have their own unique looks, like Ron's! Would you say that there are a number of resistant generations in both your two hybridizer's lines that go back some 2-3 decades of observation and selection (seeding x seedling x seedling, x seedling...an on)? I can only imagine the time and effort; well spent for such lovely results.

Chalyse,

Thank you for your kind words about my seedlings. I don't have that much time in my lines. Rust has only been in the US 15 years and I have only been actively breeding for about five years, though I have grown (and thought deeply about daylilies) for much, much longer (about 40 years now). My poultry research and breeding work kept me too busy for a long time to actively pursue breeding daylilies. Once I had gotten to where I could though, I jumped in with gusto! I produce between 50,000 - 100,000 seeds each year (though I do everything in my power to swiftly kill as many as possible, making them jump through every hoop possible to end up with, hopefully, only the strongest individuals - and I hope to cut those numbers down some as I proceed into the future and develop my own lines more fully). I am just now getting to the point where I am beginning to see some of my first F1 x F1 (F2, BC1, etc) seedlings flowering and I have some seeds from some few of those this year to plant. Being in Kentucky, I get about a generation every three years (sometime four or five years) and any plant (cultivar or seedling) can take up to five years to really evaluate properly, though some are obviously culls much sooner! My first seedlings were just seeds I purchased on the Lily Auction, trying to bring in genes to give me a one year jump-start as I bought in cultivars I wanted to work with (or thought I did at the time). I did try to pick seeds from cultivars with both phenotype traits I liked and known plant traits, including rust resistance, where it was known, but it always wasn't, so sometimes I bought things that just didn't pan out in the long run.

I don't want to pat myself too hard on the back :-), but I am an artist in addition to being a breeder and genetics fanatic, and I think that gives me an edge as I have a good eye for tones and very clear ideas in my mind of what I want to produce. As well, all those decades of growing daylilies gave me a lot of insight into what I liked and (even more importantly) what I don't like. On the rust resistance front, I apply a combination of my own experience with immune-genetic selection for over twenty years in poultry and a lot of research and field-trials to locate individual plants that have both long-term resistance and breeding value. That takes time. I consider each year's results as just more possible evidence and it is at least five years of data and testing/experience (both of the plant and its offspring - to see its breeding value) before I feel secure with making something a major focus in breeding.

Xenacrockett wrote - Great to have you here.
Question: You used "Always Afternoon" in your rust resistant breeding which is curious since my experience is she was very rusty here?
She is on my list of plants to put in the "rust coliseum" next year.
Did JKO combination counter rust in some way?


Xenacrockett,

Thanks! I didn't use Always Afternoon and don't grow it. I bought some seeds that had it as a parent in a big group of tet seeds I bought really cheap off the auction. JKO does seem to have imparted some rust resistance, but not a lot. I would call those AA x JKO sdlgs moderately resistant/moderately susceptible (and they have been through three rust test years here), whichever way you want to look at it. I look at it as both. I am experimenting with them to determine if they are useful when bred with more resistant things, as they rebloom very well here for me. The jury is still out - probably a couple more years at least before I have any real idea. JKO comes from Linda's Magic which shows moderate resistance also. Some moderately resistant plants can have breeding value when combined with the right partner, and even some highly susceptible plants can produce a few resistant plants when properly combined, but I would say that is rare, though possible - may depend on whether they are carrying recessive genes and you pick a parent with complementary genes or could just be that you combine them with something more resistant with one or more major dominant resistant genes. I can't really say yet, but would think both ways are possible. From what I hear, you are right about AA.

Brian
[Last edited by onagadori - Oct 17, 2014 5:50 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #718783 (12)
Name: Pat
Near McIntosh, Florida (Zone 9a)
Image
Xenacrockett
Oct 17, 2014 7:24 PM CST
Thanks, Brian.

So if the match is AA x JKO, JKO as pollen donor and would have more say on plant characteristics while AA as the pod parent would have more say on flower appearance. That would allow for improved rust resistance. Or that's what I understand at this point.

AA set pods easily here and is a good bloomer; too bad she isn't more rust resistant.

Like you, I've gotten many plants from seeds purchased off the internet.
It is fun to observe how rust resistant they are or aren't. Even some sibs can have big differences.
Name: Brian Reeder
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Patience is the Reward of Patience
Image
onagadori
Oct 18, 2014 3:55 PM CST
Hi, Xenacrockett

Xenacrockett wrote - So if the match is AA x JKO, JKO as pollen donor and would have more say on plant characteristics while AA as the pod parent would have more say on flower appearance. That would allow for improved rust resistance. Or that's what I understand at this point.

I don't know that the pod parent has more influence on flower while the pollen parent has more influence on plant traits. Genetically speaking, the nuclear DNA is 50/50 from each parent and I would have to think that the influence from each parent would have most to do with whether any given trait is a recessive or dominant gene or a multigenic trait, etc, rather than specific influences from a pollen parent or pod parent. The only difference I can think of would be that the pod parent may give a little something extra due to contributing the physical material from which the new plant is formed, but I don't think it would then show that much specific control on the flower.

I suspect any rust resistance I may see in those AA x JKO seedlings is due to a dominant gene(s) contributed by JKO or there could have been a recessive gene(s) that both parent carried and contributed to the offspring.

Brian
Name: Glen Ingram
Macleay Is, Qld, Australia (Zone 12a)
(Lee Reinke X Rose F Kennedy) X Unk
Region: Australia Annuals Canning and food preservation Herbs Tropicals Foliage Fan
Plays in the sandbox Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Hybridizer Composter Sedums
Image
Gleni
Oct 18, 2014 6:53 PM CST
Welcome to ATP, Brian. Welcome! Welcome!
The problem is that when you are young your life it is ruined by your parents. When you are older it is ruined by your children.
Name: Becky
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Butterflies Seed Starter Container Gardener
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Birds Ponds
Image
beckygardener
Oct 19, 2014 8:25 AM CST
Brian - I am delighted to see you here! Welcome! I've been following your blog for quite some time! I have found it very helpful in breeding for rust resistance. Thank you for sharing all that you do! You are not only a fine hybridizer, but an impressive writer like Maurice! How lucky for us to have both of you on ATP!!!

I am also on the yahoo email "daylily rust group" . I am the one that asks all the dumb questions, which others so patiently answer. *Blush*

One of the problems with rust is that there are more than just one strain of rust. A plant may be resistant to one or a few rust strains, but perhaps not all of them. That is something that is currently being addressed by sharing rust prone daylilies within the group. I think it is a great idea. I know you are on board with that idea, too!

I have a question for you .... what made you choose the name "onagadori"? I know it is a rare breed of chicken. Maybe "you" are a rare breed as a daylily hybridizer or is it in reference to breeding chickens? Thumbs up Do you breed that particular species of fowl?

I find your work fascinating. Thank you so much for sharing your ideas, research, methods, and results! Thank You!
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters, compared to what lies within us.
Garden Rooms and Becky's Budget Garden
[Last edited by beckygardener - Oct 19, 2014 8:27 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #719604 (16)
Name: Teresa Felty Barrow
South central KY (Zone 6b)
Consider the lilies of the field
Seller of Garden Stuff Hostas Region: Kentucky Lilies Peonies Region: United States of America
Garden Photography Vegetable Grower Hybridizer Bulbs Irises Hummingbirder
Image
bluegrassmom
Oct 20, 2014 3:57 AM CST
Dave, I love our database for its info and the members garden pictures.

I am looking to add some more polys next Spring. I found this list on the AHS does anyone know of a list that has the % of poly, without opening everyone? Thanks

http://www.daylilydatabase.org...

Becky, can you give me a link to his blog page? Thanks

Sorry, for getting off topic
Bee Kind, make the world a better place.
[Last edited by bluegrassmom - Oct 20, 2014 4:02 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #720006 (17)
Name: Theresa Maris
Bowling Green,KY (Zone 6b)
Daylilies Greenhouse Hybridizer Plant and/or Seed Trader Keeper of Poultry Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Birds Dog Lover Region: Kentucky Hummingbirder Herbs
Image
tgarden711
Oct 20, 2014 6:12 AM CST
Welcome Brian! Welcome!
Name: Becky
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Butterflies Seed Starter Container Gardener
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Birds Ponds
Image
beckygardener
Oct 20, 2014 4:03 PM CST
Teresa - This is Brian Reeder's blog address as he listed above under his signature on his posts:
http://www.daylilybreeder.blog...
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters, compared to what lies within us.
Garden Rooms and Becky's Budget Garden
Name: Brian Reeder
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Patience is the Reward of Patience
Image
onagadori
Oct 20, 2014 7:12 PM CST
Thanks for all your welcomes and kind words. I appreciate it!

Yes, I did breed the onagadori chickens for many years and did research with them. I don't breed them now. I only have a few bantams now, mostly Partridge Wyandotte and Rhode Island Red. For anyone interested in chickens, my poultry blog (which doesn't get updated a lot these days) is at http://www.brianreederbreeder....

Thanks again!

Brian

Page 2 of 3 • 1 2 3

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Daylilies forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by skopjecollection and is called "Aeonium arboreum"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.