Plant ID forum: Haworthia

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WhisperCloud
Jan 26, 2015 9:47 AM CST
hi all.
wanted to ask what is the name of this plant and how should i properly take care of it?like how much to water it
as you see the down parts seem dead would be nice if you could help.
thanks
Thumb of 2015-01-26/WhisperCloud/4f09d5

Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
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Dutchlady1
Jan 26, 2015 9:51 AM CST
Welcome! WhisperCloud!

That looks to be a Haworthia, a succulent. Please join us in the Succulent and Cactus Forum for lots of info on how to care for these plants Thumbs up
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
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plantladylin
Jan 26, 2015 9:55 AM CST
Welcome from me too! And, I agree that cute little plant looks to be a Haworthia. There are two like it in our database with information and photos for comparison: http://garden.org/plants/search/text.php?q=zebra+haworthia&b...
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 26, 2015 9:56 AM CST
That's going to be a Haworthia, possibly fasciata. Common name tends to be 'Zebra Plant'. I don't give mine much water at all. Not at any time of the year. Mine is planted in a coarse, fast draining soil mixture. Dappled shade most of the time, but it does get a small amount of direct sun. I think leave it alone and as the lower leaves dry up completely just see if they will detach naturally. Mine has put out pups and yours likely will do that at some point. That will hide the scars left from detaching the old leaves. I find mine to be a slow growing plant and I think they are naturally small plants. I've enjoyed mine as one of the easy care plants.
Donald

WhisperCloud
Jan 26, 2015 9:57 AM CST
thanks for telling the name.
searching the net i think i waterd it way too much that is why it is dying.
gonna water it every 2 weeks from now on.
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 26, 2015 10:03 AM CST
I forgot to say Welcome! ! Hetty is right about checking at the Succulent and Cactus Forum. I lurk in those threads a lot Smiling . Good info from knowledgeable folks. My poor Haworthias may wish they got water more often, but truthfully my duration between giving them water runs more like a couple of months instead of weeks. One different type of Haworthia is blooming, so it can't be too unhappy.
Donald
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Jan 27, 2015 1:59 PM CST
I think that is Haworthia attenuata. If you are growing it indoors right now and your indoor temps are high like consistently in the 80's, water it thoroughly once every two weeks. If your indoor temps are cooler like 65F, once a month. You have it in a glazed container, so you have to account for a longer drying time in the root zone. If soil feels damp do not water. I often put a small rock beside it, if I lift that rock and still looks damp, then I refrain from watering, especially during winter season.

And make sure your container has drainage holes, easiest way to kill succulents is to plant them in containers without drainage holes.

You can remove those rotten lower leaves, and allow the plant to dry and scab over those wet areas. Haworthias are toughies, given time to dry and heal, it will come back. You may also want to add some more pumice or perlite to your soil, so it does not seem to be too compacted.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Jan 27, 2015 9:45 PM CST
What is the difference between H. fasciata and H. attenuata?

It doesn't help me, or Whispercloud, to just say it is or is not something without saying why. Confused

If you know, don't keep it to yourself!
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 27, 2015 10:31 PM CST
I don't know the difference between them. Frankly H. fasciata and H. attenuata look the same to me. I doubt very many people could tell them apart either by how they look or what is required to grow them. I'm sure there is something that distinguishes them, but in the nursery trade I expect they are sold under an incorrect name as often as not because they look so similar. Which compounds the problem. I'm supposed to be growing H. fasciata, but I wouldn't be at all surprised if that were wrong. I have read where the nomenclature and taxonomy for this group is even worse than usual - and considering how often names change in the taxonomic world that's an indication of a mess when it comes to specifics on identifying the plant. Haworthia wasn't too hard, but after that..... There are also other Haworthias that resemble those two. That's why I said 'possibly fasciata'. I was trying to get a Haworthia as close to what I could see for growing requirements, not specific identification beyond Haworthia.
Donald
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Jan 28, 2015 12:54 AM CST
I am hoping Tarev will reply.
There must be something that makes Tarev think it is H. attenuata, and not H. fasciata.
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 28, 2015 8:51 AM CST
Have you looked at the ATP database link that Lin referenced? That brings up the entries for H. fasciata and H. subfasciata. There is no distinguishing information included. I can't look at the entries and discern how to differentiate between the two. There are a lot of photos under fasciata. I'm betting some of those photos are not fasciata, though I don't doubt at all that was the label under which they were originally purchased. Then if they were propagated and shared the problem gets increasingly compounded. I haven't posted a photo for that reason. It wouldn't provide any clarification because it looks like several of the photos already posted. But what is there does give a good idea of the 'general' type of Haworthia as opposed to others Haworthia types that are easier to distinguish. That is useful information in itself.
Donald
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
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tarev
Jan 28, 2015 10:18 AM CST
Hi Rick, typically when I try to ID a plant, I find the nearest photo that I think resembles it. I give it as a suggestion for the person asking for the name. Especially with succulents, there are so many variants, and as Donald said already, sometimes too hard to distinguish them apart. So it will be up to that person asking for an ID to compare and confirm what he can actually see to what we suggest. That is why I always use "I think" or "it may." What I also do if I get a name suggestion, I research that suggestion further and read.

For this plant in question, I am looking at the bands and spots of white on the leaves. It seems the leaves are quite sharply pointed. Researching further, it seems at times both names are used for same plant, used synonymously. So there you go, it may be same plant after all.
http://www.cactus-art.biz/schede/HAWORTHIA/Haworthia_attenua...
http://haworthia-gasteria.blogspot.com/2008/09/haworthia-att...
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jan 28, 2015 10:22 AM CST
I only linked to the two in the database because it reminded me of one I had with the label of H. fasciata. I went googling and although I have no idea how accurate this information might be, I found this page with some Haworthia desctiptions: http://succulent-plant.com/families/aloaceae/haworthia.html

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Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 28, 2015 10:36 AM CST
May I add that although it matters to us, it probably doesn't matter to WhisperCloud. We're bogging down in the details.

As long as they know it's a succulent, and maybe as far as it's a Haworthia, they will know enough to care for it properly which is usually the whole point of asking us in the first place.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier The WITWIT Badge Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Moonhowl
Jan 28, 2015 11:21 AM CST
When I went looking for a positive ID for a Haworthia I was given, I discovered many sites that declared most "Zebra Plant" Haworthias were indeed H attenuata, even those labeled H fasciata. It seems H attenuata is the more available species. Differences are difficult for any but experts to note.

http://plantsarethestrangestpeople.blogspot.com/2008/04/pal-...

http://www.haworthia.org.uk/Haworthia/fascita.htm

http://www.haworthia.org.uk/Haworthia/attenuata.htm

The full site pictures are from http://www.haworthia.org.uk/haworthia.htm


http://www.haworthia.info/en/gallery/haworthia_ib6266.html

http://www.haworthia.info/en/gallery/haworthia_ib7199.html

http://www.haworthia.info/en/gallery/haworthia_ib5404.html


http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/471/

Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
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RickCorey
Jan 28, 2015 12:14 PM CST
WhisperCloud said:thanks for telling the name.
searching the net i think i waterd it way too much that is why it is dying.
gonna water it every 2 weeks from now on.


Welcome to ATP!

I agree with the suggestion that the pot MUST have drainage holes. If not, re-potting is a very good idea. If you do re-pot, using a fast-draining mix is also a very good idea.

If you already have drainage holes, and you over-watered recently, there is a way to "un-water" or "de-water" a pot. Set the pot on top of a folded-over towel or Tee shirt, or denim. make sure that the absorbent cloth touches the soil, THROUGH the drainage holes.

Once the soil mix touches absorbent fabric firmly, a capillary connection is established that will "suck" excess water from the soilless mix, unless that mix has a lot of peat or vermiculite.

If the pot has so much water that the towel will become saturated, you can let one corner of the towel drape down 12" so that water is pulled into the towel, then drains downward and drips off or evaporates, making "room" in the fabric to absorb moare water.

P.S.
You can put paper toweling between the soilless mix and the towel, to keepp the 'dirt' out of the towel.

P.P.S.
If the pot has a layer of pebbles or broken clay pots "for drainage", that will defeat this method. The pebbles or pot shards can't maintain a capillary path, so perched water just fills the soilless mix above the pebbles, excludes air, and helps the roots rot.

Putting a layer of trash in the bottom of a container "for drainage" is only harmful, not helpful. If you need to keep mix from coming out of the holes in a pot, look for some way to make the holes seem smaller, or line them with window screening or maybe anti-static dryer sheets. You want the holes to stay as open as possible, for gas exchange.

If you need better drainage and aeration, you need to re-pot with something that has more "coarse stuff" like Perlite or coarse bark shreds. That reduces the amount of water retained, lets the excess water drain down, and holds open "pores", voids or channels so air can diffuse rapidly into the soil. If the "pores" or channels fill with water, air diffusion is slowed down by a factor of hundreds or thousands, leading to root drowning and rotting.
Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
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JRsbugs
Jan 28, 2015 4:23 PM CST
First, it's a good idea to check if both names are valid. They are according to theplantlist.

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-277139

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-277000

Next, try to search for a comparison. I found this ....

http://www.cactus-art.biz/schede/HAWORTHIA/Haworthia_attenua...

Haworthia fasciata on the above site is given as a synonym for Haworthia attenuata forma variegata ..

http://www.cactus-art.biz/schede/HAWORTHIA/Haworthia_attenua...

Different cultivars ..

http://www.cactus-art.biz/schede/HAWORTHIA/Haworthia_attenua...

Being a synonym of a plant doesn't mean a species is the same as another, it can mean that a plant has been wrongly identified at some point as one which looks similar but is in fact a different species and has been found later to be another distinct species.

More research digs up some info:

A number of different species are out there, but the one I see probably the most often is H. attenuata. This is often called H. fasciata, but apparently the actual H. fasciata is pretty rare (see Palmbob's comment here), and if you're sold one that's being called either name, it's really probably attenuata.


http://plantsarethestrangestpeople.blogspot.co.uk/2008/04/pa...

From palmbob's comment on the link given in the above link:

This is a very attractive Haworthia, but often confused with H. attenuata.

Haworthia fasciata is actually a fairly rare plant and 99% of the 'Zebra Haworthias' sold commonly around the world are actually Haworthia attenuatas.

H. fasciata has very smooth leaves on the inside/upper surface while H attenuata varieties all have a rougher to knobby upper/inside surface (though far less knobby or rough than the outside/lower leaves).

Careful examination of both these plants side by side can still leave one scratching one's head, though, as both are quite variable and can be really hard to tell apart but by Haworthia experts (which I am not).

Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier The WITWIT Badge Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Moonhowl
Jan 28, 2015 7:45 PM CST
Seems we read a lot of the same sites, Janet. nodding
Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
Charter ATP Member Organic Gardener Garden Photography Bee Lover Dragonflies Cat Lover
Butterflies Birds Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Spiders!
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JRsbugs
Jan 29, 2015 3:14 AM CST
Yup Jean, with the correct search terms they aren't difficult to find. Hilarious!
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Jan 29, 2015 5:34 AM CST
Catalogue of Life is another good one for verifying names.

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