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Apr 26, 2015 10:04 PM CST
Thread OP
Name: Amanda Gambrell
SouthEast Missouri (Zone 6b)
I was given 3 brugmansia cutting, they came in the mail yesterday. I immediately put them in a pot with tamped damp soil I soaked the soil really good and let it drain for over 24 hours before planting. I got up this morning and one is really droopy. Is that normal? Will it be ok? I am hoping it is just the shock and once it settles it will purk back up. It is my first time with them so I am just a little worried.
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Apr 26, 2015 11:59 PM CST
Name: Joy Wooldridge
Kalama, Wa. (Zone 8b)
Sunset Zone 6, Heat zone 4,
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Photo Contest Winner 2021 Lilies Daylilies Organic Gardener Cat Lover
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Hi Amanda, Welcome! to ATP.

I think you might have better results if you put those cuttings in water first. They root real easy in a glass of water. If your cuttings have leaves, strip all but the top 2 off so all the energy can be applied to rooting. Change the water every day and once they have roots you can pot them up.

Hope this helps.
Joy
No two gardens are the same. No two days are the same in one garden. ~Hugh Johnson
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Apr 27, 2015 7:58 AM CST
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
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Welcome! Amanda. I like starting my brug cuttings in water, too. But I don't change the water at all. Brugs actually secrete a rooting hormone that helps them to make roots in the water. If kept pretty warm, the cuttings usually start forming roots within a week. The water never gets funky.

As soon as you have white 'nubbins' showing up on the stems you can re-pot them. Or you can wait until the roots are lengthening out a bit, but don't wait too long because roots formed in water are not as strong as roots formed in soil. You should see roots starting within a week. Then the cuttings stand a much better chance of taking off once you pot them up.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Avatar for BabyB
Apr 27, 2015 8:36 AM CST
Thread OP
Name: Amanda Gambrell
SouthEast Missouri (Zone 6b)
Hello to you all Smiling Thank you
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Apr 27, 2015 3:38 PM CST
Name: Joy Wooldridge
Kalama, Wa. (Zone 8b)
Sunset Zone 6, Heat zone 4,
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Photo Contest Winner 2021 Lilies Daylilies Organic Gardener Cat Lover
Birds Region: Pacific Northwest Garden Photography Bulbs Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Container Gardener
dyzzypyxxy said: Welcome! Amanda. I like starting my brug cuttings in water, too. But I don't change the water at all. Brugs actually secrete a rooting hormone that helps them to make roots in the water. If kept pretty warm, the cuttings usually start forming roots within a week. The water never gets funky.


I didn't know this. Thank you. Hurray!
No two gardens are the same. No two days are the same in one garden. ~Hugh Johnson
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Apr 27, 2015 4:13 PM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
I would leave those Brugs in the soil.
I have much better luck rooting them in sand than trying to root them in water.

At my house... They rot in water, and I find it necessary to trim the bottoms if I fail to change the water often enough.

I reckon that it's just one of those things, where you try different methods until you find one that works for you.
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