Perennials forum: Gaillardia - time to bloom, and particular information on 'Punch Bowl'

Views: 696, Replies: 14 » Jump to the end
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
Moon Gardener Irises Heucheras Vegetable Grower Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
Polymerous
May 5, 2015 10:26 PM CST
I recently ordered a package of seeds for the hybrid Gaillardia 'Punch Bowl'. I was wondering how long it takes Gaillardia (in general) to grow from seed to a blooming plant. Does anyone know?



After I ordered the seeds, I belatedly discovered that this hybrid is supposedly an annual. I was wondering if anyone has experience with this particular Gaillardia, and can say whether or not it is truly an annual (versus perennial). If it is an annual, is it hardy - that is, will it overwinter in warm climates?

( was advised to also inquire about this particular plant on both the annuals and seeds forums, so I will do so. Hopefully somebody has some experience with this plant.)
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: Kelli
Canoga Park, CA, Sunset 19 (Zone 10a)
Where summer is winter
Region: California Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
Kelli
May 8, 2015 11:11 AM CST
It took mine two years, or rather, it bloomed in its second summer. This was a generic Gaillardia. It blooms all year now in my zone. Mine is a perennial.
Take a walk with me at http://cubits.org/dayhikes/
Name: Leslieray Hurlburt
Sacramento California (Zone 9b)
The WITWIT Badge Region: California Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Xeriscape Native Plants and Wildflowers Salvias
Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Birds Bee Lover Hummingbirder Butterflies
Image
HamiltonSquare
May 8, 2015 2:28 PM CST
We have them sown from a parent plant and the seedlings sprout with the winter rain and are blooming now on a small plant. Were in the same zone but probably sunnier here.
Hamilton Square Garden, Historic City Cemetery, Sacramento California.
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
Moon Gardener Irises Heucheras Vegetable Grower Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
Polymerous
May 8, 2015 5:56 PM CST
I guess how long it takes from seed to bloom depends on how the seeds/seedlings are grown. Someone on one of the other forms said 6-7 weeks for theirs, but I don't think they weren't sowing them in/on the soil. I don't think I have the patience to wait overwinter, or more than a year (!) to see bloom. (I already have to wait two years for my daylily seedlings; I'm not going to wait that long for garden color.)

Leslieray, I've been up to Sacramento many times. I think that we get about the same amount of sun, but in my experience, it is much hotter where you are.

I know that 'Arizona Apricot' and 'Oranges and Lemons' are perennial; I've had them for at least two years here. I was wondering about 'Punch Bowl', though, because the vendors say that it is an annual. I am hoping that at worst, it will be a half-hardy or tender perennial, and I can maybe overwinter it some years. (I grow Pelargoniums and licorice plants as perennials... most years they survive without cover.)

I guess I will find out. Glare
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: Leslieray Hurlburt
Sacramento California (Zone 9b)
The WITWIT Badge Region: California Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Xeriscape Native Plants and Wildflowers Salvias
Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Birds Bee Lover Hummingbirder Butterflies
Image
HamiltonSquare
May 8, 2015 6:28 PM CST
The annuals can overwinter but don't live long anyway. Lived in texas accross from a field full of wildflowers incuding G. pulchella and when it was really cold and no snow to blanket thing wich was most years, everything died but by summer there was always a field full of them. They do seem to love the heat. I waited three years for a biennial but it was absolutely worth it.
Thumb of 2015-05-09/HamiltonSquare/d2eaa9

Hamilton Square Garden, Historic City Cemetery, Sacramento California.
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
Moon Gardener Irises Heucheras Vegetable Grower Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
Polymerous
May 8, 2015 10:45 PM CST
Biennial? I thought there were only perennials, and annuals - and to be honest, until this whole 'Punch Bowl' thing came up, I thought there were only perennials! Confused
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: Leslieray Hurlburt
Sacramento California (Zone 9b)
The WITWIT Badge Region: California Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Xeriscape Native Plants and Wildflowers Salvias
Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Birds Bee Lover Hummingbirder Butterflies
Image
HamiltonSquare
May 8, 2015 11:01 PM CST
There are very few biennials. We grow two. Foxgloves and Echium. The bummer is that they set seed and die. The wait is worth it and we try to stager them so some bloom every year.
Hamilton Square Garden, Historic City Cemetery, Sacramento California.
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
Moon Gardener Irises Heucheras Vegetable Grower Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
Polymerous
May 9, 2015 2:21 AM CST
Sorry, I thought you meant a biennial Gaillardia! Blinking
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: Judy
Simpsonville SC (Zone 7b)
Plant and/or Seed Trader Peonies Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 I helped beta test the first seed swap
Image
SCButtercup
Mar 19, 2016 4:05 PM CST
i have a gaillardia that i grew from seeds i collected while on vacation 2014 summer in florida. Bloomed 2015 the first year, i started indoors in feb under lights. they reseeded prolifically and overwintered in mild zone 7b. there is a large clump of them thriving in garden, lets see what blooms look like this year.
Name: Jennifer
48036 MI (Zone 6b)
Cottage Gardener Houseplants Spiders! Heucheras Frogs and Toads Dahlias
Hummingbirder Sedums Winter Sowing Peonies Region: Michigan Garden Ideas: Level 2
Image
jvdubb
Mar 19, 2016 4:28 PM CST
I bought Punch Bowl this year. I've grown other Gaillardias. Always started them outside in jugs and they all bloomed that summer. I expect this to be the same, especially since it is an annual
Name: Bonnie
Chandler, AZ (Zone 9b)
Region: Arizona Bee Lover Butterflies Hummingbirder Xeriscape Birds
Seed Starter Winter Sowing
Image
droughttolerant
Mar 20, 2016 6:51 AM CST
I love to grow Gaillardia. They are some of the sturdiest prolific bloomers for my hot, sometimes humid/sometimes dry Arizona garden. I have Burgundy, Arizona Apricot, Goblin, Golden Goblin, Mesa Yellow, Mesa Peach and had some Pulchella (the annual). Now maybe I have to try the Punch Bowl. Looking at your picture, they remind me of a cross between Pulchella and Burgundy. I have started them indoors in the summer, planted them out in the fall in mid-September here, and they bloom like crazy in mid-spring (March here). I've winter sown them, planted in early spring and they didn't bloom until later summer, but still like crazy. I sowed some Sundance Bicolor (sold as an annual) indoors in the winter, set out in early spring (Feb 15 or so here) and they bloomed dark red the first year, in April. The second year they bloomed with a lot of yellow and some red in March. Did the bees do that?This year, year three I had to pull them out because they got really straggly despite cutting them back hard. So, here they weren't an annual. We are in the same zone, so maybe the Punch Bowl won't be for you. I have a lot of volunteers this year and can't wait to see what variety they are. They are great for filling in empty spots if they volunteer in the right place. They also move and divide really easily. One thing that helps me keep them going (I have some five years old) is to cut off the blooms in Nov/Dec so they don't wear themselves out. I tell them not to waste it, but they don't listen. If I remove the buds in Nov/Dec it seems to rejuvenate them. Please let us know how the Punch Bowl do for you. They are pretty. Thumbs up
Name: Judy
Simpsonville SC (Zone 7b)
Plant and/or Seed Trader Peonies Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 I helped beta test the first seed swap
Image
SCButtercup
Mar 20, 2016 5:49 PM CST


Thumb of 2016-03-20/SCButtercup/409c2a

Does this look like punch bowl?
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
Moon Gardener Irises Heucheras Vegetable Grower Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
Polymerous
Mar 21, 2016 3:35 PM CST
Alas, what with water restrictions (among other reasons) I never got around to planting the seeds last summer/fall. Sad

The good news is that I kept the seeds, and we have had a fair amount of rain this season, so I may still start them, if I can find where I stashed them. Rolling my eyes. We will be traveling in two months, however, so I am dithering over whether they will be big enough to go outside (with spray irrigation water) if I start them now.... or if I should just wait until we get back. Confused
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Mar 23, 2016 5:16 PM CST
I tried three Gaillardias last Apr 2011, got them as seedlings already and have planted them in containers: Arizona Sun, Mesa Yellow and Arizona Red Shades. By July 2011 I got their first blooms, but in the following years, I have been too bad in watering, so it comes back sporadically and noticing too that in my area it is happiest coming back in early to mid Spring or in late summer to late Fall. I have often deliberated pulling them out and discarding them altogether, but they immediately get a reprieve from me, when I happen to see a bud forming again. So far it is either Arizona Sun or Mesa Yellow that ably comes back.

I have been really bad and mean with my Gaillardias, but somehow it manages to come back on and off. My garden gets too shaded once the city trees are leafing, so it adds to the predicament of getting sustained blooms in my garden. They love to have lots of sun and a bit stepped up watering here since we just get too hot and dry.
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
Moon Gardener Irises Heucheras Vegetable Grower Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
Polymerous
Mar 23, 2016 9:05 PM CST
'Oranges and Lemons' is planted right at the corner of our patio, where it gets afternoon shade. It blooms starting sometime in spring all the way into fall (when it starts getting too much shade), comes back reliably, as does an 'Arizona Apricot' which was also planted there (which I am going to move).

On the other hand, an 'Arizona Apricot' which I had planted in full sun, failed to come back this spring. I'm not sure why... (Everything is on auto irrigation, 2X/week, unless the rain sensor shuts it off.)
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Perennials forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Lilium 'Pink Perfection'"