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May 10, 2015 1:57 AM CST
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
is there any hormon that can suit a hydroponic plant.
for example:aglaonema
if i put regular rooting hormon in a dry surrounding with soil(or lets say damp surrounding)then it will develope regular roots and then i need to start to change the roots to water roots....right?
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May 12, 2015 1:57 PM CST
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
I have no use for internet bullies!
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Rabbit Keeper Frugal Gardener Garden Ideas: Master Level
Plant Identifier Region: Georgia Native Plants and Wildflowers Composter Garden Sages Bookworm
I use a gel-type rooting hormone such as Clonex and medium called 'Root Riot'.
http://www.growthtechnology.co...
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
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May 12, 2015 3:48 PM CST
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier The WITWIT Badge Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages
Hi David. From what I understand, there is no difference between hydroponic (water) roots and soil roots. Give this PDF a look. It seems the difference is the oxygen content along with the regular flow of nutrients that makes the difference...see what you think. I do know that cuttings started in water have roots that are a bit finer and need time to acclimate to soil, so usually need a little extra moisture when transplanted. I hope these links are of help to you.

http://osufacts.okstate.edu/do...

According to this info, you can use any rooting hormone, but liquid and gel, like Clonex are just easier to use.

http://www.simplyhydro.com/cut...
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May 12, 2015 9:49 PM CST
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Moonhowl said:Hi David. From what I understand, there is no difference between hydroponic (water) roots and soil roots. Give this PDF a look. It seems the difference is the oxygen content along with the regular flow of nutrients that makes the difference...see what you think. I do know that cuttings started in water have roots that are a bit finer and need time to acclimate to soil, so usually need a little extra moisture when transplanted. I hope these links are of help to you.

http://osufacts.okstate.edu/do...

According to this info, you can use any rooting hormone, but liquid and gel, like Clonex are just easier to use.

http://www.simplyhydro.com/cut...


great the site is very helpful
thanks
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May 12, 2015 10:16 PM CST
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier The WITWIT Badge Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages
You are most welcome. Smiling
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May 18, 2015 10:44 AM CST
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Moonhowl said:Hi David. From what I understand, there is no difference between hydroponic (water) roots and soil roots. Give this PDF a look. It seems the difference is the oxygen content along with the regular flow of nutrients that makes the difference...see what you think. I do know that cuttings started in water have roots that are a bit finer and need time to acclimate to soil, so usually need a little extra moisture when transplanted. I hope these links are of help to you.

http://osufacts.okstate.edu/do...

According to this info, you can use any rooting hormone, but liquid and gel, like Clonex are just easier to use.

http://www.simplyhydro.com/cut...


hi
maybe do you know.....there is a plot with sweet peas growing now....but they all are one shade of purple.
i was thinking.....if i pick the seeds when they dry up and sow them in autumn or end of winter....
wont they have other shades too?
where do the other shades come from?
if it is from polination
then the butterfly should have the other shades in the area....but this plot is isolated....
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May 18, 2015 10:53 AM CST
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
I have no use for internet bullies!
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Rabbit Keeper Frugal Gardener Garden Ideas: Master Level
Plant Identifier Region: Georgia Native Plants and Wildflowers Composter Garden Sages Bookworm
Sweet Peas are pollinated by bees and bees can fly up to 4 miles from their hive location. Your plot may not be as isolated as you think and the bees may have visited may other colors before visiting your plot.

According to this site: http://www.saburchill.com/chap... ... "The sweet pea is an excellent example. Its flower structure allows only the bee to enter because other insects do not have the correct size or mass..."
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
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May 19, 2015 7:55 AM CST
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
greene said:Sweet Peas are pollinated by bees and bees can fly up to 4 miles from their hive location. Your plot may not be as isolated as you think and the bees may have visited may other colors before visiting your plot.

According to this site: http://www.saburchill.com/chap... ... "The sweet pea is an excellent example. Its flower structure allows only the bee to enter because other insects do not have the correct size or mass..."


thanks alot i will look up the site....thanks for the explanation
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