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Jun 2, 2015 4:51 AM CST
Name: Jason
Gold Bar, Washington (Zone 8b)
to replace the one that keeled over last winter. normally in the past we just dig a hole and plop in the new plant. leaving the current stems and all the foliage intact. ive heard however, for a more impressive display NEXT YEAR, its best to cut it all off and allow the roots to grow this season, and not necessarily worry about flowers or foliage this year, correct?
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Jun 2, 2015 5:28 AM CST
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b and Fl
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
Native Plants and Wildflowers Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Keeps Horses Hummingbirder Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
I would think that leaving foliage attached would help it settle in faster. I don't remove buds either, because if I haven't yet seen blooms I'll want to see if the plant was tagged properly.

Now, I would be tempted to dis-bud an overeager new rootlet; those little plants really do need to concentrate on growing more roots first.
Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


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Jun 2, 2015 9:17 AM CST
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: Ukraine Dahlias I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Houseplants Tomato Heads Garden Ideas: Level 1
Plant Identifier Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Too many people just dig a hole. Proper preparation is part of success. I'd add bone meal, compost and manure to the soil where the clematis will grow. Some devout gardeners will cut off the current growth but, like Chelle, I like to be sure of the color and the name, so I allow it to bloom then cut it back.
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Jun 2, 2015 3:22 PM CST
Name: Jason
Gold Bar, Washington (Zone 8b)
yeah, we always ad a cup of alfalfa meal and a cup of chicken manure to the hole and then cover them with a 2 inch layer of compost. but ive often heard that cutting off any existing stems will benefit the plant in the long run...
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Jun 2, 2015 4:03 PM CST
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: Ukraine Dahlias I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Houseplants Tomato Heads Garden Ideas: Level 1
Plant Identifier Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Many people do it.
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Jun 2, 2015 4:08 PM CST
Name: Jason
Gold Bar, Washington (Zone 8b)
is there any credence to the theory that its actually better for the plant to cut them off than it is to simply leave them on?
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Jun 2, 2015 4:29 PM CST
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: Ukraine Dahlias I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Houseplants Tomato Heads Garden Ideas: Level 1
Plant Identifier Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015
I've often read that the best of the English gardeners won't allow any perennial to bloom for the first two years so the roots develop. I've just never had that kind of courage or patience.
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Jun 2, 2015 5:21 PM CST
Name: Jason
Gold Bar, Washington (Zone 8b)
I cant wait two years! haha
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Jun 2, 2015 6:09 PM CST
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: Ukraine Dahlias I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Houseplants Tomato Heads Garden Ideas: Level 1
Plant Identifier Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015
I know how you feel.
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