Roses forum: Miniature red rose bush

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Name: Dylan Nolan
Calhoun tn
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dylannolan
Jun 18, 2015 6:04 PM CST
Dove in head first and bought a mini rose bush don't know what it needs to grow good

Sincerely,
Dylan
Thumb of 2015-06-19/dylannolan/714c25

Name: Kyla
Richmond, VA (Zone 6b)
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kylaluaz
Jun 18, 2015 6:10 PM CST
That's a pretty one! Usually with plants I purchase, if I am going to keep them in containers I repot them right away in some good potting soil with some amendments, and in a larger container than the one they came in. Do you plan to keep this in a container or put it in the ground?

I am not a rose expert by any means but I think if the soil is fertile and you give it enough sunlight and water, it will likely thrive. I have planted out those mini-roses people give as gifts -- they're everywhere, even groceries carry them -- a few times with great success. They seem pretty sturdy. The one you have looks like a larger plant than those, though.
Name: Dylan Nolan
Calhoun tn
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dylannolan
Jun 18, 2015 6:16 PM CST
I want to keep it in that but if it will grow better in a 2 gal pot I'll repot and do you think I should fertalize with Jobe's all purpose its 4-4-4?
Name: Kyla
Richmond, VA (Zone 6b)
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kylaluaz
Jun 18, 2015 6:39 PM CST
Well, I can't see what it's in now from your photo, it is a one gallon container? Yes almost surely it needs to be up-potted fairly soon, but it does look pretty healthy so it can probably wait a little while... really can't tell from the picture.

I would not fertilize it until it's repotted, and for myself I only use organic fertilizers, and generally use compost of some kind and don't fertilize per se. So someone else would have to advise you about that.

@RoseBlush1 might have some good tips for you if we can get her attention.
Name: Kyla
Richmond, VA (Zone 6b)
Composter Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Herbs Daylilies Sempervivums
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kylaluaz
Jun 18, 2015 6:47 PM CST
*Blush* I just realized we're in the Roses forum surrounded by rose people, and I had thought we were in Ask a Question. Pretty much everyone here probably knows more about roses than I do.... so I am going to zip it now and let someone else answer any other questions.

Sticking tongue out
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Jun 18, 2015 7:56 PM CST
Hi Dylan ..

Congratulations on your purchase of your first miniature rose ... It looks like you purchased a healthy plant.

First a bit of bad news ... rose are not indoor plants. Without a lot of extra work, they will not thrive indoors as you cannot provide the kind of light they need and may not be able to provide the proper humidity. In Europe, miniature roses are sold as throw-away plants. They are used for temporary home decoration and after a few weeks, people just throw them away. They can be good container plants or garden plants outdoors.

So now the question back to you is: When you keep your rose outdoors, do you plan to keep it as a container plant or plant it in the ground ?

In either case, you will probably want to replace the soil the plant is growing in right now as these roses are supplied to nurseries, big box stores, grocery stores, etc. by subcontractors which do not necessarily use the best soil for you to use going forward.

Once you know what you plan to do with the rose, I, or others on this forum, can give you more specific care information.

Smiles,
Lyn
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Dylan Nolan
Calhoun tn
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dylannolan
Jun 18, 2015 8:44 PM CST
I plan on putting it in a 2-3 gallon container when put outside I usually use miracle grow organic choice but plan on using rose specified dirt for its new container, how many hours of sun should I let it get, does it need misted?, I need to know everything I am a 19 year old and this is the first rose I have ever owned and I want to get it right the first time
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Jun 18, 2015 9:28 PM CST
Dylan ...

Roses are pretty forgiving. Also, there are a lot of "right" ways to grow roses ... Smiling

The information I am sharing is based upon what I have learned over the years and my own experience. Others may do things differently and the rose will still be OK.

I haven't used any of the potting soils currently on the market, many of which say they feed the plants for months. Maybe someone else who has experience with them can give you better advice than I can. The most important thing about your choice of potting soil is that it has good drainage. If it doesn't drain well, you can end up with root rot. If it drains too fast, you will have to water your rose more often.

If you are placing your container on hardscape, you will want to lift it a bit so that water can drain out when you water the container. You want your soil moist, not wet.

Your choice of container makes a difference, too. I don't like to use clay containers because they can wick moisture away from the root mass and can get quite hot. After all, people cook in clay. If you do use a clay container, line it with bubble wrap and this will insulate the root mass. I prefer to use plastic or thermolite containers.

Generally, roses need six hours of sunlight. Your rose probably has never had that much, so you need to harden it off by starting it out in dappled shade and moving it gradually to a sunnier site.

Roses do not need to be misted.

After transplanting wait to feed the rose until you see new top growth. This tells you that the root system is working and can handle being fed. My rule of thumb is to feed lightly and often. I used regular liquid plant food at half strength. Water your rose well the day before you feed it and you won't have any problems with fertilizer burning the roots. I think this is wise whether you choose to use organic or chemical fertilizers.

I understand your wanting to do everything right with your first rose. However, you can do everything right and a rose still might go toes up. It depends on the rose. Roses are tough and are good survivors, so I think you won't have that problem. It's just a possibility.

Feel free to keep asking questions. There are a lot of members here that are happy to offer you support.

Smiles,
Lyn

I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
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CindiKS
Jun 18, 2015 9:50 PM CST
Kyla, I grow them the same way you do!
Dylan, I pot the small roses in regular commercial mixes such as Miracle Grow with the food and moisture control. Did your rose have a name on it?
Even though it's a miniature rose, it could possibly get 3 or 4 feet tall!
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