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Jul 31, 2015 5:03 AM CST
Name: Patrick
Toms River, New Jersey (Zone 7a)
Dog Lover Irises Lilies Region: New Jersey Orchids Region: Pennsylvania
Roses
Here's a dumb question..... but I wanted to post this anyhow.
I have a number of Iris where I have duplicates and triplicates
that I will be planting in the garden. My question is, how close
together can I plant these same iris varieties ? Can they be planted
right next to one another ? Do I plant them facing all in the same
direction?
Avatar for crowrita1
Jul 31, 2015 5:36 AM CST
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Beekeeper Region: Illinois Irises Celebrating Gardening: 2015
http://irises.org/About_Irises... you may find some useful info here.
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Jul 31, 2015 5:40 AM CST
Name: Patrick
Toms River, New Jersey (Zone 7a)
Dog Lover Irises Lilies Region: New Jersey Orchids Region: Pennsylvania
Roses
crowrita1 said:http://irises.org/About_Irises/Cultural%20Information/Grow_Bearded.html you may find some useful info here.


Yes, I've seen that before from the AIS. It is very confusing. It talks about spacing rhizomes 12-inches apart - then it shows a triangle and indicates the 3 rhizomes are spaced 8-inches apart. Duh ! So, what gives here ? Confused
Avatar for crowrita1
Jul 31, 2015 5:53 AM CST
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Beekeeper Region: Illinois Irises Celebrating Gardening: 2015
If you are planting "different" cultivars of iris.....and you don't want them to bet "mixed in a clump"....plant them at least 12" apart ( I always space at least 18', and usually 24"....so I don't have to dig the clump so often), BUT if you want to make an "instant" clump, using multiple rhizomes of the SAME cultivar.....they're saying to use the "triangle method".
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Jul 31, 2015 5:59 AM CST
Name: Greg Hodgkinson
Hanover PA (Zone 6b)
Garden Photography Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises Region: Japan Region: Pennsylvania
The idea of keeping the rhizomes apart by at least 12 inches is because of their growth. If you plant closer, you will need to dig them up sooner since they will begin to blend in with their neighbor. The tri-angle senerio is for creating a "mini-clump" with one variety. I don't believe they are trying to indicate you do the 8 inch triangle thing with different cultivars.
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Jul 31, 2015 6:01 AM CST
Name: Greg Hodgkinson
Hanover PA (Zone 6b)
Garden Photography Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises Region: Japan Region: Pennsylvania
Arlyn is just faster than I am at posting I tip my hat to you.

and we agree!
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Jul 31, 2015 6:02 AM CST
Name: Patrick
Toms River, New Jersey (Zone 7a)
Dog Lover Irises Lilies Region: New Jersey Orchids Region: Pennsylvania
Roses
Misawa77 said:The idea of keeping the rhizomes apart by at least 12 inches is because of their growth. If you plant closer, you will need to dig them up sooner since they will begin to blend in with their neighbor. The tri-angle senerio is for creating a "mini-clump" with one variety. I don't believe they are trying to indicate you do the 8 inch triangle thing with different cultivars.


No - I have multiples of the SAME cultivar, and want to plant them together - I have (3) of Quaker Lady,
(3) of Prairie Sunset, (3) of Queen of May, (2) of Argus Pheasant . . . . etc., so I want to keep the same
cultivars planted together.
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Jul 31, 2015 6:57 AM CST
Name: Greg Hodgkinson
Hanover PA (Zone 6b)
Garden Photography Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises Region: Japan Region: Pennsylvania
Then the AIS recommends the 8 inch triangle method for your cultivars (I would do "Argus Pheasant" in a line with the "toe" at opposite ends). I would plant your "mini-clump" triangles about 20-24 inches away from any other clumps so they have room to grow.
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Jul 31, 2015 8:34 AM CST
Name: Patrick
Toms River, New Jersey (Zone 7a)
Dog Lover Irises Lilies Region: New Jersey Orchids Region: Pennsylvania
Roses
Unfortunately, I do not have the space or the garden size to spread out clumps that far apart Sad
My one Iris garden is a rectangle - It is 9-ft. long by 2 1/2-ft wide. I don't know how many "Triangles"
I'll be able to plant in the space. I already have some iris rhizomes already planted in that space.
But I will do my best. Thanks for the recommendations. Smiling
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Jul 31, 2015 10:16 AM CST
Name: Leslie
Durham, NC (Zone 8a)
Garden Photography Cat Lover Irises Region: North Carolina Peonies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Quaker Lady is a good grower and makes big clumps. If the rhizomes are small I have made triangles smaller than 8 inches of QL. You will just have to separate the clump sooner if they really take off in their growth.
"The chimera is a one time happenstance event where the plant has a senior moment and forgets what it is doing." - Paul Black
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Jul 31, 2015 12:49 PM CST
Name: Mary Ann
Western Kentucky (Zone 7a)
Birds Irises Hummingbirder Hostas Keeps Horses Farmer
Daylilies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Container Gardener Region: Kentucky Region: United States of America Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Patrick -- you're going to need more land.
Thoughts become things -- choose the good ones. (www.tut.com)
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Jul 31, 2015 12:50 PM CST
Name: Lucy
Hamilton, MA (Zone 6b)
irises
Charter ATP Member Cottage Gardener Irises Region: Northeast US Region: United Kingdom Region: United States of America
Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Make sure they are facing the same direction or they will walk away from each other.
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Jul 31, 2015 2:02 PM CST
Name: Patrick
Toms River, New Jersey (Zone 7a)
Dog Lover Irises Lilies Region: New Jersey Orchids Region: Pennsylvania
Roses
Muddymitts said:Patrick -- you're going to need more land.


LOL. I have (2) Iris garden areas . . . . . Smiling
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Jul 31, 2015 2:03 PM CST
Name: Patrick
Toms River, New Jersey (Zone 7a)
Dog Lover Irises Lilies Region: New Jersey Orchids Region: Pennsylvania
Roses
irisarian said:Make sure they are facing the same direction or they will walk away from each other.


If they are facing in the same direction .... that does not coincide with the AIS "Triangle" diagram.
Confused
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Jul 31, 2015 3:41 PM CST
Name: Lucy
Hamilton, MA (Zone 6b)
irises
Charter ATP Member Cottage Gardener Irises Region: Northeast US Region: United Kingdom Region: United States of America
Enjoys or suffers cold winters
The triangle is placement of space. They should not be pointing a different way. I can't draw or I would show you what I mean.
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Jul 31, 2015 4:07 PM CST
South central PA (Zone 6a)
Irises Region: Pennsylvania
Patrick,
You can plant somewhat close in that 9' bed., 15 to 18" between clumps left to right. Try staggering the clumps of each variety in a zigzag fashion with 6 clumps in the rear row and 5 in the front, but make the front ones offset from the rear with clumps centered on the spaces in the rear row giving a 15-18" diagonal spacing. This will allow a few more clumps to fit in the "small" area.
dave
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Jul 31, 2015 5:04 PM CST
Name: Meredith
New Hampshire (Zone 5b)
Region: New Hampshire Cat Lover Butterflies Hummingbirder Keeper of Poultry Roses
Lilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Daylilies Bee Lover Irises Seed Starter
irisarian said:The triangle is placement of space. They should not be pointing a different way. I can't draw or I would show you what I mean.


Do you mean the rhizome sides should all face in towards each other? I was wondering what ways to plant them myself after digging and dividing a bunch for the first time.
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Jul 31, 2015 8:52 PM CST
Name: Mary Ann
Western Kentucky (Zone 7a)
Birds Irises Hummingbirder Hostas Keeps Horses Farmer
Daylilies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Container Gardener Region: Kentucky Region: United States of America Celebrating Gardening: 2015
OK -- first of all, Lucy is a master Irisian, and anything that she has to say is valuable. Dave is also a smarty!!!!

But -- when I want to create a clump as fast as possible, I plant three rhizomes with the *toes* facing each other -- therefore the *heel* is facing outward. This gives the increases room to develop on the side of the heel, which is the mother.

Hope this makes sense.
Thoughts become things -- choose the good ones. (www.tut.com)
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Jul 31, 2015 9:18 PM CST
Name: Lucy
Hamilton, MA (Zone 6b)
irises
Charter ATP Member Cottage Gardener Irises Region: Northeast US Region: United Kingdom Region: United States of America
Enjoys or suffers cold winters
yes I claim each rhizome facing the same direction. Not very coherent am I?
Last edited by Calif_Sue Aug 1, 2015 10:48 PM Icon for preview
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Jul 31, 2015 9:18 PM CST
Name: Paul
Utah (Zone 5b)
Grandchildren are my greatest joy.
Annuals Enjoys or suffers cold winters Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Plays in the sandbox
Tender Perennials Tomato Heads The WITWIT Badge Region: Utah Vegetable Grower Hybridizer
This is not of earth shaking importance but I agree with Lucy...If you plant three do so in a triangle with the toes pointing the same direction. Increase usually comes on the heel of the rhizome so this method forms a clump. Toes pointed inward can end up with a clump with an empty center. In you own garden do just what you want. Experiment. It's not going to make a great deal of difference. Are we grinding it a little fine Confused
Paul Smith Pleasant Grove, Utah

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