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Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Dec 22, 2010 8:52 PM CST
All these books are available at Amazon.com.
I've included Amazon.com ratings
Books that I have.
Wildflowers of Texas by Geyata Ajilvsgi 4 1/2 stars
Large, beautiful photographs. Flowers arranged by color.

Wildflowers of Houston & Southeast Texas by John and Gloria Tveten 4 1/2 stars
Photograph are a bit small compared to the previous book but still very good quality.

Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas by George Oxford Miller 5 stars
The first 53 pages deals with landscaping. The remainder is dedicated to individual native plants, with plenty of information on each species, including suitable zone, propagation, environmental requirment and more.

I don't have these but they are on my wishlist.

How to Grow Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest: Revised and Updated Edition
by Jill Nokes 5 stars

Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest: A Practical Guide
by Delena Tull 4 stars

Remarkable Plants of Texas: Uncommon Accounts of Our Common Natives by Matt Warnock Turner 4 1/2 stars

Texas Wildscapes: Gardening for Wildlife, Texas A&M Nature Guides Edition
by Kelly Conrad Bender not rated

Legends and Lore of Texas Wildflowers by Elizabeth Silverthorne 4 1/2 stars
wildflowersoftexas.com



Name: Linda Williams
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Enjoys or suffers hot summers Organic Gardener Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets
Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover
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LindaTX8
Dec 26, 2010 5:34 PM CST
I'm a book-aholic, as far as Texas native plants or anything close to that are concerned. Really should stay out of bookstores and off book sites! I think I've got every single book you mentioned, except the second one...and it doesn't cover my area, otherwise I'd have it.
The newest book is Texas Wildscapes Gardening for Wildlife by Kelly Conrad Bender, which I've barely flipped through, but it looks really exciting!
Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country by Marshall Enquist
For a field guide for this area, it's excellent, it's my native plant bible. I can't exist for long without it near me. The only downside is that they haven't chosen up to update it in any way since it came out in 1987, so the botanical names are dated, Also, this paperback will fall apart fairly soon if used much...and how can you NOT use it a lot? But I just love it!
Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest by George O. Miller
Great book, wonderful info and pictures. Some of the plants are from elsewhere in the Southwest, but that's okay.
Native Texas Plants Landscaping Region by Region by Sally Wasowski and Andy Wasowski
A truly amazing book! The large amount of info in it is well worth what you'd pay for it. Sally is truly one of the legendary gurus of Texas native plants...I am in awe of her!

Will continue as I can...my computer is really screwed up, so I have to break it up into a number of posts.
.


I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Linda Williams
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Enjoys or suffers hot summers Organic Gardener Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets
Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Image
LindaTX8
Dec 26, 2010 6:40 PM CST
How to Grow Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest by Jill Nokes
Another of the gurus of our native plants. She concentrates here on info on growing and propagating native plants, as well as info on specific species. Again, there's a fantastic amount of info in this book. Very well-researched, she calls upon those who have made propagation their life's work to contribute what they know also. I once went to the wildflower center in Austin to listen to her talk to those interested in what she had to tell them. This mainly covers the woody plants, BTW.
Remarkable Plants of Texas by Matt Warnock Turner
This book chooses a number of Texas species and in each chapter, it gives some basic info on each one, includes photos and then relates histories and stories about it. I've met him...a professor of business, but his interest in plants is evidently very strong, so he took time off to research, write this book and travel around giving talks about it. Very interesting!
Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas by George O. Miller
I like this one also...general landscaping info, lists by category and then the info on each individual plant makes it easy with the photos and info layouts.





I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Linda Williams
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Enjoys or suffers hot summers Organic Gardener Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets
Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Image
LindaTX8
Dec 26, 2010 8:18 PM CST
Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest by Delena Tull
I like this, because growing edible plants is really a good thing. The more you can use or eat the plants the better. Still, I am not inclined towards crafts much. It has recipes and instructions and also warnings on the plants that are toxic or give you rashes. I grow pokeweed for the wildlife...haven't yet used it as a dye or cooked it up yet. ButI want to grow Tomatillos and try the Enchilada Calabacitas recipe! Teas are my favorite thing...did you know that Yaupon Holly can be used for a tea?
Grasses of the Texas Hill Country by Brian and Shirley Loflin
Absolutely the hardest kind of plants to ID are the grasses. I'll have to admit I'm still kind of limited there. Even some on my own property I still haven't figured out. But some are pretty easy. It has both native and introduced grasses, with photos and info. Kind of disturbing how many kinds of nonnative grasses are growing in Texas.
Trees, Shrubs and Vines of the Texas Hill Country by Jan Wrede
I know this lady and this is a more extended version of her first book, which I believe was called Texans Love Their Land. Beautiful photos and really good info on Hill Counry plants. Includes some invasive exotics and offers native alternatives to them.

I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Linda Williams
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Enjoys or suffers hot summers Organic Gardener Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets
Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Image
LindaTX8
Dec 27, 2010 3:20 PM CST
Toxic Plants of Texas by Hart, Garland, Barr, Carpenter and Reagor
This book was obviously primarily put together for agricultural people, but it's got good photos and it's interesting to know what can be toxic for animals. Amazing how many plants were introduced as forage and yet...can be toxic. Johnsongrass, for instance...that one I'd already heard can be toxic...curses on the people who introduced it. Many of my favorite native plants can be toxic, too.
Field Guide to the Broad-Leaved Herbaceous Plants of South Texas by Everitt, Drawe and Lonard
Another one that has agricultural importance, yet has been very useful to me in identifying plants. Has good photos and mentions what livestock and wildlife consume the plants.
Tree, Shrubs and Cactus of South Texas by Everitt and Drawe
Also useful to both agricultural and plant people. Photos and brief descriptions. For me, the heights given in metric have to be converted...fortunately, many calculators can do that. This book allowed me to ID the Rock Trumpet or Flor de San Juan I'd seen in a natural area park. Later, some popped up on the edge of my property...thanks to whoever put up a fence along that property line to contain some pigs for the neighbors. Those last two South Texas books have been very useful to me.
Wildflowers, Trees, and Shrubs of Texas by Delena Tull and George O. Miller
The photos are a bit small if you ask me, but they help...also has leaf drawings in some sections. Brief descriptions for info on the plants. What I really like the most is the little maps showing what parts of the state have these plants growing wild. Very nice book.
Texas Wildflowers by Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller
Nice photos, good wildflower field guide for the whole state. I did find one mistake a species with the wrong photo above the description. But also very nice.
Plants of Central Texas Wetlands by Fleenor and Taber
Helpful in identifying wetlands plants, especially in the Ottine Wetlands of South-central Texas, although Texas wetland plants are somewhat similar in many parts of the state. Nice photos and descriptions, well done. Wish I had a true wetlands around here, but the dry creek here is usually pretty dry. We had a pretty wet fall and winter last time and a bit less so in the spring, which I noticed really changed things a LOT after the extreme drought that came before it. Now we're back to drought again...although we got a little bit of rain lately. I'd just like to be able to grow Texas Bluebells without buying a plant or two every time! Oh well.
Texas Wildflowers, A beginner's field guide to the state's most common flowers by Berly Magley and illustrated by DD Dowden.
This is a little booklet, only 32 pages that I found at a gift shop one time. Really nice colorful illustrations and descriptions of the limited species it covers.
Trees of Central Texas by Robert A. Vines
A field guide with black and white illustrations of trees and bushes and complete descriptions. Comes in handy, although color photos would be nice.










I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Mar 21, 2013 5:23 PM CST
I should not have looked at this thread. Now I want almost all of the books described! (The rest I have already.)
Porkpal
Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
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Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 8:21 AM CST
@LindaTX8 mentioned this book, and tea:

Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest by Delena Tull

Regarding tea; The farmer's market here has a yaupon tea stall. I only tried the plain sweetened, no flavorings added. It tastes like a really smooth version of regular Liptons. I asked if it was mixed with regular tea and she said no. She also muttered something about roasting it first. I should ask for more details next time.

I have one mature female yaupon. 11 young females (supposedly, I don't know how they know), and 4 young males. All newly purchased.
I was glad to see the book you mentioned that covers propagation. I was just searching how to propagate yaupons a few days ago. Im going to look for that book on amazon now.

Are we not supposed to treat this as a regular thread? Its sticky(or whatever y'all call it) and noone has put much here...?

[Last edited by Iluvtobake - Mar 22, 2019 9:04 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1932986 (7)
Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
Image
Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 1:50 PM CST
LindaTX8 said:Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest by Delena Tull
I like this, because growing edible plants is really a good thing. The more you can use or eat the plants the better. Still, I am not inclined towards crafts much. It has recipes and instructions and also warnings on the plants that are toxic or give you rashes. I grow pokeweed for the wildlife...haven't yet used it as a dye or cooked it up yet. ButI want to grow Tomatillos and try the Enchilada Calabacitas recipe! Teas are my favorite thing...did you know that Yaupon Holly can be used for a tea?
Grasses of the Texas Hill Country by Brian and Shirley Loflin
Absolutely the hardest kind of plants to ID are the grasses. I'll have to admit I'm still kind of limited there. Even some on my own property I still haven't figured out. But some are pretty easy. It has both native and introduced grasses, with photos and info. Kind of disturbing how many kinds of nonnative grasses are growing in Texas.
Trees, Shrubs and Vines of the Texas Hill Country by Jan Wrede
I know this lady and this is a more extended version of her first book, which I believe was called Texans Love Their Land. Beautiful photos and really good info on Hill Counry plants. Includes some invasive exotics and offers native alternatives to them.



Re: Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest A Practical Guide by Delena Tull

@LindaTX8
I found this one on Amazon- the price is high for used. I'm not allowed to post links yet or I would put it here. Is it worth that price -over $20 -for used?

Also on Amazon:

Edible and Useful Plants of the Southwest: Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona by Delena Tull-

Do you have it as well? The one star review regarding an error concerns me. I'm trying to reign in my Amazon spending... If you find yourself with nothing to do, could you look on Amazon and compare the general amount of recipes with the book you have? I've been wanting a book on texas edibles. I only have one small pocket guide.


I have Trees, Shrubs and Vines of the Texas Hill Country by Jan Wrede, also. Fantastic book. Great pics. I live out in the hills, so I find it really useful.



[Last edited by Iluvtobake - Mar 22, 2019 2:38 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1933257 (8)
Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
Image
Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 3:08 PM CST

It has taken a very long time for me to appreciate the beauty in drought resistant gardens. And even longer to see beauty in agaves and yuccas. The book below changed me from a hater to a lover. They are very interesting and useful plants. 'nuff said.

Agaves Yuccas and Related Plants
A Gardener's Guide
by Mary & Gary Irish


Thumb of 2019-03-22/Iluvtobake/fbfddd

[Last edited by Iluvtobake - Feb 19, 2020 11:21 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1933292 (9)
Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
Image
Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 4:48 PM CST
Southern Herb Growing
by Madeleine Hill & Gwen Barclay
with Jean Hardy

Another great favorite. The authors used to live in Cleveland, Texas where they moved when they retired in 1957. Their retirement project herb garden turned into a business with 25 employees. Mail order herbal products, a restaurant using their herbs in really creative dishes, public speaking, a monthly column in the Houston Home and Gardening magazine started in 1978, cooking workshops. A tornado destroyed it in 1983. They were still rebuilding when the book was written in 1987.
Gosh I wish I could have seen their place. It was called Hilltop Herb Farm.

Written from the perspective of gardeners in hot, humid, rainy climates like Houston. Detailed descriptions and growing conditions. How to propagate and harvest. Uses and lore. Lists of different varieties for most things. Many, many beautiful photos.

Part One: A Herbal Primer
Part Two: A Growing Guide (alphabetical listing)
Part Three: Cooking With Herbs


Southern Herb Growing
by Madeleine Hill & Gwen Barclay
with Jean Hardy


Thumb of 2019-03-22/Iluvtobake/5cc650

Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
Image
Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 5:15 PM CST
Related to gardening:

Birds of Texas Field Guide
by Stan Tekiela

Organized by color. Small birds at the beginning of each section - graduates to largest birds at the end. Makes it very easy to identify unfamiliar birds.
One inch thick but small enough to fit in a purse.


Thumb of 2019-03-22/Iluvtobake/27b0df

Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
Image
Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 5:20 PM CST
Texas Wildlife Portfolio
Photagraphy by KAC Productions
and Dave Welling
Text by Gary Clark

Nice coffee table book with brief descriptions and interesting facts.

Thumb of 2019-03-22/Iluvtobake/be3b44

[Last edited by Iluvtobake - Mar 22, 2019 5:36 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1933380 (12)
Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
Image
Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 5:32 PM CST
Butterfly Gardening for Texas
by Geyata Ajilvsgi

I haven't read this one yet, but I found it interesting, ironic, and a little disturbing that Cedar is listed in the chapter on Larval Food Plant Profiles.

If anyone wants more details on the book, please ask. It will force me to delve deeper into it.

Thumb of 2019-03-22/Iluvtobake/5b34ce

[Last edited by Iluvtobake - Mar 25, 2019 12:44 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1933384 (13)
Name: Bread Baker
Central Texas Hill Country (Zone 8b)
Image
Iluvtobake
Mar 22, 2019 5:38 PM CST
Thumb of 2019-03-22/Iluvtobake/9c0625

Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Herbs Region: Texas Vegetable Grower Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
pod
Feb 18, 2020 9:27 PM CST
Adding a few that I've picked up over the years. I don't think they were listed above.

Wild Flowers of the Big Thicket (East Texas and Western Louisiana) ~ Geyata Ajilvsgi

Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening ~ Greg Grant

Herbs for Texas ~ Howard Garrett with Odena Brannam

And my all time favorite that @Iluvtobake mentioned above.
Southern Herb Growing ~ Madeleine Hill & Gwen Barclay with Jean Hardy
Believe in yourself even when no one else will. ~ Sasquatch
Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Feb 18, 2020 10:01 PM CST
pod said:Adding a few that I've picked up over the years. I don't think they were listed above.

Wild Flowers of the Big Thicket (East Texas and Western Louisiana) ~ Geyata Ajilvsgi

Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening ~ Greg Grant

Herbs for Texas ~ Howard Garrett with Odena Brannam

And my all time favorite that @Iluvtobake mentioned above.
Southern Herb Growing ~ Madeleine Hill & Gwen Barclay with Jean Hardy


Wildflowers of the Big Thicket is first on the list. That's the first plant book I think I ever purchase, back when it first came out. Nomenclature is way out of date, but it's still a good reference book.
wildflowersoftexas.com



Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Herbs Region: Texas Vegetable Grower Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
pod
Feb 18, 2020 10:13 PM CST
I'm sorry, I saw your listing said Wildflowers of Texas and I thought it may have been another book she had out. She did an assortment of reference books.

It is an excellent reference, particularly applicable to the area of east Texas that I am in. I have found IDs for a wild orchid (Crippled Crane Fly orchid) that is growing here. Also this was the first book I found reference to the Spigelia or Indian Pink that is growing wild by my pond. It is a reference that I will treasure. I tip my hat to you.
Thumb of 2020-02-19/pod/d82a88

Believe in yourself even when no one else will. ~ Sasquatch
[Last edited by pod - Feb 18, 2020 10:36 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2160589 (17)
Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Feb 18, 2020 11:00 PM CST
You are correct Kristi, that was a different book I posted. I don't know how I missed posting Wildflowers of the Big Thicket since it was my first and most used book. I have spent many hours walking the trails in the Big Thicket, long before the internet. Stopping to check out every little splash of color I saw on the side of the road. Her book was indispensable.
wildflowersoftexas.com



Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Herbs Region: Texas Vegetable Grower Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
pod
Feb 19, 2020 5:31 AM CST
How would you rate it in comparison to Wild Flowers of Texas by Geyata Ajilvsgi?
Believe in yourself even when no one else will. ~ Sasquatch
Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Feb 19, 2020 7:57 PM CST
pod said:How would you rate it in comparison to Wild Flowers of Texas by Geyata Ajilvsgi?


Overall I would say Wildflowers of Texas is the better book. It's smaller and the cover is fairly hard even though it's listed as a paperback. This makes it more convenient to take in the field. Also there is only two photos per page so they are much easier to see. It's organized by color instead of habitat which makes it easier to find what you are looking for. But I find Wildflowers of the Big Thicket more useful for me since it focuses strictly on flowers of this area instead of the entire state.
wildflowersoftexas.com



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