Ask a Question forum: autumn is at the door

Views: 212, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Aug 30, 2015 1:51 AM CST
although we get 33 degrees at mid day.....i feel in the coolness of mornings that autumn is at the door.
my question is....
in a book explaining how to propogate different plants it says:" dip in rooting hormon" and then put in soil....
i took a peperomia and a beleperone and stuck them in water and they have rooted.....is it because i have the privelage of hot weather that it succeded? now its getting cooler ....i think there is a fear they will rot.....the same happened with hedera helix rooted in water in a shaded area.
Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
Rabbit Keeper Critters Allowed Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages
Herbs Region: Georgia Region: United States of America Native Plants and Wildflowers Dog Lover Composter
Image
greene
Aug 30, 2015 7:27 AM CST
Some cuttings that are rooted in water will form roots, but the roots may be too weak to make the transition to being planted in soil.

I usually root my cuttings in damp vermiculite. When I lift the cuttings they have a strong root system, some vermiculite adheres to the roots and the plants easily make the change to being planted in soil. For me it is 'trail and error' to know which plants like to root in water and which prefer to root in other medium. I am sure someone with more experience will come along with a better answer.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
Pour vivre parmi les fleurs
Irises Garden Photography I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Butterflies Birds
Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Hummingbirder Plant Identifier
Image
Zencat
Aug 30, 2015 7:49 AM CST
I agree with Greene. There are lots of studies that have been done on water rooting vs in soil. Roots done in water appear to be less stable as they have adjusted to light being on them. Being placed suddenly in the dark make them even less stable and much weaker. I would follow Green's advice.

You seem to have done very well with your plants. Trial and error teaches us many things. Mostly what works best for you. Good luck with your plants! Thumbs up
Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Aug 30, 2015 8:38 AM CST
You have two questions temperature and hormones. Plants need warmth to germinate or root, around 22 degrees or more. Hormones are usually recommended for rooting plants, but not always necessary. Some plants root so well on their own there is no need for it. Some may root faster while others it is very necessary. If you are having success without hormones then I would say, just keep doing what you are doing.
wildflowersoftexas.com
texasnatureonline.com


[Last edited by Horntoad - Aug 30, 2015 8:39 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #940141 (4)
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Aug 30, 2015 8:39 AM CST
greene said:Some cuttings that are rooted in water will form roots, but the roots may be too weak to make the transition to being planted in soil.

I usually root my cuttings in damp vermiculite. When I lift the cuttings they have a strong root system, some vermiculite adheres to the roots and the plants easily make the change to being planted in soil. For me it is 'trail and error' to know which plants like to root in water and which prefer to root in other medium. I am sure someone with more experience will come along with a better answer.


thank you for your help
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Aug 30, 2015 8:44 AM CST
Zencat said:I agree with Greene. There are lots of studies that have been done on water rooting vs in soil. Roots done in water appear to be less stable as they have adjusted to light being on them. Being placed suddenly in the dark make them even less stable and much weaker. I would follow Green's advice.

You seem to have done very well with your plants. Trial and error teaches us many things. Mostly what works best for you. Good luck with your plants! Thumbs up


thanks who said light?i cover the jar with black paper or root them in beer bottles. i know it is not total darkness but am aware that the darkeness is i deal conditions for rooting.what i keep forgetting is the different type of roots(water versus soil) ilike the half -half technique
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Aug 30, 2015 8:57 AM CST
Horntoad said:You have two questions temperature and hormones. Plants need warmth to germinate or root, around 22 degrees or more. Hormones are usually recommended for rooting plants, but not always necessary. Some plants root so well on their own there is no need for it. Some may root faster while others it is very necessary. If you are having success without hormones then I would say, just keep doing what you are doing.


yes i did not make myself clear....what do i want to root?
cissus antarctica african violet hibiscuss
another question(related) if i want to preseve a special coleus through the winter....i should first root in water or try the half-half way and then it will be in soil during the winter(higher temperature)rather than in water(room temperature)right?
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Aug 31, 2015 11:21 AM CST
Coleus usually root well in damp vermiculite without rooting hormone but I do use it just to ensure success. You can take cuttings anytime. Pinch out any flowering tips. I like to plant at least two sets of leaf nodes (minus the leaves) below the soil line. Bright light is fine but no direct sun. You can invert a clear plastic cup or container over the cuttings for the first week or two to keep moisture close to the leaves until the roots start forming. Do let a little fresh air in under the "domes" every day. They should root in a couple of weeks. Water the vermiculite if it starts getting dry.
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Sep 1, 2015 5:52 AM CST
Shadegardener said:Coleus usually root well in damp vermiculite without rooting hormone but I do use it just to ensure success. You can take cuttings anytime. Pinch out any flowering tips. I like to plant at least two sets of leaf nodes (minus the leaves) below the soil line. Bright light is fine but no direct sun. You can invert a clear plastic cup or container over the cuttings for the first week or two to keep moisture close to the leaves until the roots start forming. Do let a little fresh air in under the "domes" every day. They should root in a couple of weeks. Water the vermiculite if it starts getting dry.


thank you for your reply i will try your patent

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Baja_Costero and is called "Agave"