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Avatar for terrymurphy
Sep 20, 2015 4:21 PM CST
Thread OP

Hi I am totally new here and just a novice grower here. I recently had the branch of my plumeria snap off my tree when the winds became too heavy and caused my tree to topple...It has taken me some 15+ years to get my tree large with branches and to bloom here in Cleveland Ohio and gosh I would really hate to lose such a nice branch and was hoping for some advice on what I need to do with it and also the one that the branch snapped off from. I am assuming I can propigate the branch but not sure how to go about it. I realize I have it in a vase, not sure if it will root or rot...please help me out. I have pictures thanks for any help Confused I was wondering as well what to do with the branch that now is empty? The potted plant is a single trunck with three arms. I dont want it to look unbalanced...will it bloom again and set leaves next year? Confused Help...please...thank you
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Avatar for Dutchlady1
Sep 20, 2015 4:42 PM CST

Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Forum moderator
Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Welcome! terrymurphy

There's not much you can do about your plant being 'unbalanced' but it will grow new branches.

As for the one that broke off: clip off the leaves (don't tear, clip about 1 " away from the stem) and leave it to dry in a shady place. The bottom of the cutting has to form a callous for it to start rooting and you wouldn't root in water but in a mixture of soil and perlite, or straight perlite, or even sand (the point being that it needs to be well-draining). You don't want to water the rooting cutting until it grows new leaves.
From the look of your leaves I would venture a guess that the variety you have may be 'Celadine' which fortunately is easy to root.

Good luck and keep us posted.
Avatar for terrymurphy
Sep 20, 2015 5:03 PM CST
Thread OP

Thank you for your advice. I just so hate to cut those beautiful leaves, lol, this is the first year we had such a lovely bloom of leaves and flowers. Sighing! Question, so when the stalk is healed..when should I plant it? right away? I know that the warrm season is soon going to be over, yet I am thinking there is still time. When I plant it should I put it in my patio? or outside in the sun? Not sure what to do. The stalks that I grew these from I had gotten some 15 years ago and it took me this long just to get them to the 3-4 ft heigth that they are now. Never really fertilized them or anything was not sure what to use. I am surprised I muddled through this far with out knowing anything at all about them. But over the years both my husband and myself have loved these plants and treat them like our babies, lol. Broke my hubby's heart when he saw the branch had broke off. Thanks again
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Avatar for Dutchlady1
Sep 20, 2015 5:12 PM CST

Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Forum moderator
Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Yeah you still have time especially with an easy to root variety. Give it 10 days or so to heal, and then you may want to put it in a warm place (bottom heat is what they want for rooting). Some people get heat mats. But better not in the sun, the low angle this time of year could cause sunburn.
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Sep 20, 2015 5:15 PM CST
Name: Gigi AdeniumPlumeria
Florida (Zone 9b)
Adeniums Roses Plumerias Orchids Miniature Gardening Hibiscus
Region: Florida Container Gardener Garden Photography Cactus and Succulents Butterflies Garden Ideas: Level 1
Welcome! Terry I know how you feel, good thing is, plumeria is a very forgiving plant....on positive note, if you can successfully root this, you will have 2 plants instead of one :whistling:

Cutting the leaves off will not harm it but will help it direct its energy to rooting. Bottom heat is important with the rooting process, I usually root them using a clay pot (around this time of the year) or cheap black pot and place the newly potted cuttings on paver bricks for bottom heat. If you put it outside in the sun, protect it from unwelcome rain. It is important to keep the cuttings more on the dry side, water once, then do not water again until new leaves start coming out. I wait until I have 4 true leaves.

Some use 100% perlite when rooting to help prevent root rot.
©by Gigi Adenium Plumeria "Gardening is my favorite pastime. I grow whatever plant that catches my attention. I also enjoy hand pollinating desert roses.”
Last edited by GigiPlumeria Sep 20, 2015 8:30 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for terrymurphy
Sep 20, 2015 6:42 PM CST
Thread OP

Thank you all for the advice!! Cant wait to get started...this time next year...3 plants yes! Lovey dubby will keep you posted
Last edited by terrymurphy Sep 20, 2015 6:42 PM Icon for preview
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