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Sep 27, 2015 3:27 PM CST
Thread OP
Name: Sherry Austin
Santa Cruz, CA (Zone 9a)
Birds Bulbs Region: California Dragonflies Foliage Fan Irises
Keeper of Poultry Roses Photo Contest Winner: 2015
I went out to check on an Iris that I'm thinking of moving, and found the leaves rotting at the base. I'm wondering if it be Mustard fungus. It looked kind of cottony inside the fold of the leaves, and there were tiny orange spheres. There's no foul smell, although I found some small patches of rot on the rhizomes. From the pictures I've seen of Mustard fungus, the spheres were not large enough, but I'm wondering if they start out small? I dug it up and am dipping in a clorox solution, and probably stick it in a pot and see if I can save it. It's a pretty one, that I'd like to keep (Absolute Star). I'm thinking I should probably dig out the soil as well. I really haven't dealt with this before and am awaiting the advice of those more knowledgeable than I on these matters.

If it's not one thing.....

Thumb of 2015-09-27/Henhouse/f3f414 Thumb of 2015-09-27/Henhouse/fcfc41
The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us.
Avatar for crowrita1
Sep 27, 2015 4:03 PM CST
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Beekeeper Region: Illinois Irises Celebrating Gardening: 2015
I'd say it's a 'fungal" type disease.....maybe 'crown rot' ? http://extension.psu.edu/pests... there's another site wit better / more pictures, and a more 'encouraging' treatment....but I can't find it right now *Blush* .
I also found two with rot problems, today......the 'stinky, soft rot".....I scraped, and squirted with Listerine, then drenched one plant with a bleach /anti bacterial dish soap mixture, and gave the other two aspirin Shrug! .Neither was 'terrible', but, ANY problems are bad enough !!
I'll check again for that other disease page, but, if it was me, I'd be sure to include some sort of fungicidal treatment, rather than just a biocide.
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Sep 27, 2015 5:42 PM CST
Thread OP
Name: Sherry Austin
Santa Cruz, CA (Zone 9a)
Birds Bulbs Region: California Dragonflies Foliage Fan Irises
Keeper of Poultry Roses Photo Contest Winner: 2015
I just saw a little thing about the anti-bacterial dish soap on the AIS site. I haven't heard of using Listerine.

The rot on the rhizomes was manageable and not too extensive. Seriously surprising though given how hot & dry it's been. Joe was talking about Mustard Seed fungus at our last meeting, so that was the first thing my mind went to.
The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us.
Avatar for crowrita1
Sep 27, 2015 6:41 PM CST
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Beekeeper Region: Illinois Irises Celebrating Gardening: 2015
I'm not too sure just what the differences are between the mustard seed fungus, and the one that causes crown rot ( maybe even the same one !), but both of those, as well as the botrytis rot, are fungal in origin .....basically, if it stinks...it's a bacteria, if it DOESN'T stink(or even smells kinda' "sweet and yeasty"), it a fungus. I found that Listerine (the cheap, wally world imitation Sticking tongue out ), poured into an empty windex spray bottle, with one teaspoon of "broad spectrum fungicide, seems to do a good job of "drying" up the soft, rotten tissue.....and *may* actually either help kill the bacteria, or fungus.
The more I read on the subject of the various rots...and the causes......and the treatments for them......the more I think we need to really consider we *may* be doing more harm, than good, with our "treatments". take the old "dust it with comet" treatment....yes, it will kill bacteria.....but it also adds a lot of phosphates to the area......and, according to some *experts*, the use of excessive phosphate promotes rot Blinking .
I'm considering using Agri strep, or an agricultural biocide, this next spring, if my problems come back. The 'high powered" fungicide I used this spring seemed to halt the botrytis.......but ,of course, didn't do a thing for the bacterial soft rot that had entered the "wounded" rhizomes. The problem with either the biocides, or the fungicides, is that they kill both the 'targeted" ones, and also the "good "ones, that the soil needs. So far, the 'aspirin" drench seems to improve the rhizome's chance of survival....but , that may be wishful thinking on my part Sticking tongue out
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Sep 27, 2015 10:56 PM CST
Thread OP
Name: Sherry Austin
Santa Cruz, CA (Zone 9a)
Birds Bulbs Region: California Dragonflies Foliage Fan Irises
Keeper of Poultry Roses Photo Contest Winner: 2015
You're able to get agricultural streptomycin? I've never seen it on any store shelves here. Maybe I should check online... I've had fire blight all over the orchard this year. It might have been helpful for that. Half of my apples were affected and all of my pears. Sad
The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us.
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Sep 28, 2015 6:02 AM CST
Name: Linnea
Southern Maine, border 5b/6a (Zone 5b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Art Irises Organic Gardener Permaculture
Plant and/or Seed Trader Winter Sowing
Serenade is a strep product. I got a bottle of concentrate for around $20 delivered off of eBay. One uses 1/4 cup to a gallon of water. It goes a long way on my little 1/4 acre, but for bigger jobs, see if you can find greater quantity.
Don't make fear based decisions.
Avatar for crowrita1
Sep 28, 2015 6:51 AM CST
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Beekeeper Region: Illinois Irises Celebrating Gardening: 2015
You may have to check with an actual agricultural supply / spraying company, to find it, Sherry. I know our local nursery *used* to carry it, but no longer does, as the "state regulations" have changed. If you use it, or, any of the 'high powered" chemicals (especially in the powdered form!) be sure to wear a mask, gloves, and such...and follow the directions !! Argistrep has been proven to affect the auditory nerves, and going deaf wouldn't be a good 'trade off" !
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Sep 28, 2015 5:01 PM CST
Thread OP
Name: Sherry Austin
Santa Cruz, CA (Zone 9a)
Birds Bulbs Region: California Dragonflies Foliage Fan Irises
Keeper of Poultry Roses Photo Contest Winner: 2015
I'm an infrequent, but careful sprayer. I'll be pruning the apples and pears down even more this year, so when they're in bloom, a small amount would probably be enough.

Nurseries don't carry any but the basics anymore... Ewing has more chemicals, and I may have seen Serenade there, not knowing what it was.
The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us.
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Sep 30, 2015 7:23 PM CST
Name: Linnea
Southern Maine, border 5b/6a (Zone 5b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Art Irises Organic Gardener Permaculture
Plant and/or Seed Trader Winter Sowing
Serenade is approved for organic gardening.
Don't make fear based decisions.
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Oct 1, 2015 12:11 AM CST
Thread OP
Name: Sherry Austin
Santa Cruz, CA (Zone 9a)
Birds Bulbs Region: California Dragonflies Foliage Fan Irises
Keeper of Poultry Roses Photo Contest Winner: 2015
Good to know, Thanks Linnea.
The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us.
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