: Do fushia do well in hot climates?

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Name: Hummingbird Beck
EL PASO TX (Zone 8a)
Hummingbird
Oct 24, 2015 1:05 AM CST
In early spring they are beautiful! Once it starts warming up to the 80's they seem to die of the heat even if I put them in a shaded area.
Name: John
St.Osyth Nr Clacton on Sea. E
Region: United Kingdom Hybridizer Garden Ideas: Master Level Ferns Butterflies Salvias
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midnight21
Oct 24, 2015 3:37 AM CST
Hi Hummingbird.

Fuchsias mainly come from the wooded mountain areas of South America, Just below the frost line. They should grown with this in mind if possible. They like to be grown in a dappled shaded area if possible. In the summer here on the east coast of England the temperature can go as high as 95f. and I have no problems with them, and during the year I grow around 80 different varieties, and around 400 to 500 plants. The tryphilla varieties are more heat tolerant, so you could try these. Also over watering kills a lot of fuchsias as people try to compensate for the heat. Keep them moist, not wet and a misting a couple of times a day may help. Hope this helps. Any other questions please ask.

John

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Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
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chelle
Oct 24, 2015 6:02 AM CST
Hummingbird said:In early spring they are beautiful! Once it starts warming up to the 80's they seem to die of the heat even if I put them in a shaded area.


I've found this series to be reliably heat tolerant -

http://suntorycollection.com/gardeners/angel-earrings%C2%AE-...

I situate the plants so that root areas are completely shaded and the tops are in half day sun that will turn into dappled sun by the hottest days of mid summer. I've also found that planting in straight compost works best in a typically dry summer climate.

Also, if planting in containers choose the deepest ones you have available. If you don't over water in the plants' initial growing stages the roots will run quite deep to find moisture. These plants will benefit greatly once the heat arrives by having previously established roots in deeper, cooler soil.

Happy growing, Hummingbird. Smiling



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Name: Hummingbird Beck
EL PASO TX (Zone 8a)
Hummingbird
Jan 23, 2016 3:16 AM CST
Thank you 😊 for all of the advice. I will try 😊 again this spring, I love ❤ the violet, and fushia pink!
Name: John
St.Osyth Nr Clacton on Sea. E
Region: United Kingdom Hybridizer Garden Ideas: Master Level Ferns Butterflies Salvias
Hostas Heucheras Clematis Birds Bee Lover Daylilies
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midnight21
Jan 23, 2016 4:07 AM CST
Fuchsia will survive quite an amount of heat as long as they get a bit of shade at some time during the day. If you can find a shaded area somewhere in the garden they should be OK. You could also if possible make a small shade house. The triphylla type fuchsias are more heat tolerant. Lastly, keep them moist not wet. In hot climates people tend to over water them.

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