Bulbs forum: overwintering gladiolus bulbs

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caitlinsgarden
Nov 4, 2015 10:06 AM CST
How to store?
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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gemini_sage
Nov 4, 2015 10:59 AM CST
Glads are about the easiest to store successfully during winter, they're not bad for over drying. After digging I lay them out so they can dry, then shake off soil, and break the old corm off the bottom. Then I store them in paper bags or mesh onion bags and keep them in a cool dry place.
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Jeanne
Lansing, Iowa (Zone 5a)
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gardenglassgems
Nov 5, 2015 5:30 AM CST
I dug up all my Glads these 2 past nice days. Believe it or not, I tried to pick up every single little corm that was left behind. Does anyone else pick all these up? My question is can I put these tiny bulbs (corms) in soil and grow them under grow lights to give them a jump start? Also, does anyone know how long it takes a medium size corm to flower once planted? Does it take several years for it to get big enough to produce flowers?

Yard decor, repurposing, and flowers,

caitlinsgarden
Nov 6, 2015 3:57 PM CST

Neal, thank you! I guess I will have to let the foliage dry until the corms come off easily.
Jeanne, I am sure it would take them several years to bloom, think of baby tulips. I would try planting the babies separately in a pot for next year, just to keep track of them. I don't know about starting indoors, it always seems a lot of trouble to me in the winter!
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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gemini_sage
Nov 6, 2015 5:48 PM CST
You're very welcome, and absolutely right- allow the foliage to dry till it sloughs off the corm easily.

Those baby corms sometimes grow surprisingly fast just growing them as usual in a regular length growing season. It depends on the variety, some are more vigorous than others. I've had them reach blooming size in 3 years and 2 years for smaller hardy and species types.

Jeanne, what are you calling medium size? Say nickle size?
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Jeanne
Lansing, Iowa (Zone 5a)
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gardenglassgems
Nov 6, 2015 7:16 PM CST
Thank you Neal and Caitlin. Yes, the medium ones are about nickel size.

Thanks for the advice. I will also wait until the stalks dry up before removing the corms. I can't believe how many I have compared to how many I planted in the Spring. Not sure what I am going to do with all these Glads.....
Yard decor, repurposing, and flowers,
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Nov 6, 2015 7:37 PM CST
Nickle sized corms develop pretty quickly, I'd say full sized within a year. I bought a bunch last year pretty small, about quarter sized, and surprisingly most bloomed with full size stalks. The corms I dug were huge! I couldn't believe it, some 3" in diameter.
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi

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