Herbs forum: Eutrochium purpureum - Sweet Joe Pye, Gravel Root, Queen of the Meadow

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Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Nov 4, 2015 8:08 PM CST
Another of my favorites. Sweet Joe Pye Weed (Eutrochium purpureum) This is a very large plant, both in height and width, so give it plenty of elbow room. The roots are diuretic and as noted by one of its common names, may be useful in a tincture against gallstones or kidney stones. A late bloomer, Joe brings welcome color to the late summer/fall garden, coordinating well with all the golden browns and red. Mine easily tops 8' and I've moved it to my side field to allow it to spread out to a large bunch with blueberries in front of it. Very nice combo.


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[Last edited by Bonehead - Nov 4, 2015 8:19 PM (+)]
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Delaware (Zone 7b)
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gardeningal
Nov 4, 2015 9:23 PM CST
A woman I worked with, landscaping, loved to use Joe Pye Weed in a lot of her planting schemes. This along with the butterfly bush. They are both hardy plants for sun and wind.
North Hills of Reno NV (Zone 4b)
The LORD God planted a garden, I di
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GrannyPeck
Feb 4, 2016 2:38 AM CST
I live in a mobile home park in Reno, NV at the base of Peavine Mountain with winds up to 40-50 miles an hour. The managers removed our common 6 foot wooden fence that was beginning to topple over and now we have no wind break. I have heard that Joe Pye weeds are sturdy, great pollinators, give off a delightful fragrance in the breeze and the leaves make a wonderful tea. I am considering planting these for a privacy hedge but how fast do they colonize and get established? Any input would be great!
GrannyPeck
Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Feb 4, 2016 10:24 AM CST
Welcome, GrannyPeck! What a great idea. I love the tall Joes, and they would really make a striking statement as a wind break. I've had mine for many years, and have split and moved them now and again, with good success. They clump out at a good pace, I think I'd start by planting about 2-3' apart, perhaps in a staggered line so it looks more casual. You may want to add some columnar evergreens now and again for a bit more winter privacy. I let Joe sit over winter with the seedheads, which would give you a bit of vertical screening (depending on how thick you plant them), but not a whole lot.

Another thought, or in addition to Joe Pye, you could look at some of the taller grasses (Karl Foerster is a good one) or clumping bamboos. Those hold well over winter as well and look lovely in the wind. I have Karl at the crest of a hill and he never gets knocked down by the fairly steady wind we have coming up the hill. I don't know the cultivar of clumping bamboo I have, but it has stayed well within bounds and is evergreen for me. I am currently trying to propogate more to use as further screening between us and our neighbor.

Take photos of before and after - we all love to follow projects!
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.

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