Daylilies forum: daylily hardiness

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Name: Linda Curtis
Prince Edward Island, Canada (Zone 5b)
1peislander
Nov 9, 2015 11:25 AM CST
Hi All,
Here's another question for you! What is the best way to protect daylilies for winter?
Regards,
Linda
Name: Jan
Hustisford, WI
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Daylilies Dog Lover Irises Region: United States of America
Region: Wisconsin
Image
philljm
Nov 9, 2015 4:40 PM CST
I use the leaves from my trees.
Jan
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Nov 10, 2015 7:35 AM CST
I'm in Eastern Ontario so don't get any winter freezing and thawing as I imagine you may get on PEI (lovely place!)? I haven't lost a daylily over winter in many years but also haven't bought many newer cultivars either, for full disclosure Smiling Anyway, FWIW I don't use any winter protection for daylilies. They don't always get a lot of snow when it's cold either but nor does the ground ever thaw during winter. All daylilies are dormant here regardless of registered foliage type because it's simply too cold for any leaves to survive or growth to occur.

There are a couple of things to bear in mind - firstly because a daylily is evergreen, semi or dormant in the hybridizer's garden (which is what goes on the registration) doesn't necessarily mean it will behave that way in someone else's garden, especially if in a different climate. So, for example, a daylily dormant in the north may be evergreen in the south and registered as either (or semi-ev) depending where it was hybridized/registered.

Secondly, foliage behaviour does not indicate hardiness but we may be turning that aspect into a self-fulfilling prophecy by our own regional preferences in that area.

Alex mentioned the terms hard and soft dormant. Since these are commonly used terms in daylilies but are not official AHS terms we can use them however we like of course, but I've learned over the years that the meaning varies by person which makes them confusing. I don't know who originally coined the terms, but in his book Hemerocallis, The Daylily, Bill Munson defined them thus:

Hard dormant "...requiring a long dormant period"
Soft dormant "..requiring only about a month or less of rest before starting into growth again."

He also described hard evergreens (evergreen but hardy) and soft evergreens (evergreen but tender), which is using the terms hard and soft differently from his dormancy uses. We don't hear these terms nearly as often as hard and soft dormant, I don' think, guess they didn't catch on!


Name: Linda Curtis
Prince Edward Island, Canada (Zone 5b)
1peislander
Nov 12, 2015 8:30 AM CST
Hi All,
I'm in the process of covering all my new-this-year daylilies with a layer of coarsely chopped leaves; this is what I use as mulch to keep the weeds at bay on all my beds so this will also give me a head start on the weeds come spring! I'll report the results next spring.
Thanks to everyone for the advice; it is so good to tap in on the experience of other gardeners. We don't have a local daylily society; the closest one is in Halifax, Nova Scotia, a 4 hour drive each way plus $45. bridge fare!
Regards,
Linda
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Nov 12, 2015 2:15 PM CST
$45.00 bridge fare??? Why don't they just stand there with a gun and rob you!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Nov 12, 2015 2:30 PM CST
Seedfork said:$45.00 bridge fare??? Why don't they just stand there with a gun and rob you!


It's an eight mile long bridge that replaced a car ferry so was costly to build. It's quite something to drive over - supposedly the longest bridge over ice-covered waters in the world according to the bridge web page (Confederation Bridge). Last time we went over it was about thirteen years ago and I don't remember what it cost back then (it's a round trip toll, not that much I don't think). Certainly now makes going across to the island for the famous PEI seaweed pie a bit pricey Hilarious!

Name: Linda Curtis
Prince Edward Island, Canada (Zone 5b)
1peislander
Nov 12, 2015 2:55 PM CST
Sure beats sitting in line at the ferry terminal waiting for the next ferry which you may or may not get on due to heavy traffic! The ferry crossing then takes about an hour (longer in winter if the ice is bad), but the bridge only takes about 25 minutes to cross.
Some are lobbying for free bridge crossing, but I doubt that will happen!
Regards,
Linda
Name: Tim
Omaha, NE (Zone 5b)
Daylilies
Image
tcmfish
Nov 12, 2015 5:16 PM CST
I'm also mulching some newer lilies and wondering should I just pile it on real thick, and then uncover in spring, or just a decent layer and leave it?
Name: Jan
Hustisford, WI
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Daylilies Dog Lover Irises Region: United States of America
Region: Wisconsin
Image
philljm
Nov 13, 2015 12:13 AM CST
I now just put a decent layer on. If spring is really wet and cold I will remove the thicker areas or loosen them up to try to prevent rot.

Of course, as windy as it is today I might not have any leaves left!
Name: Linda Curtis
Prince Edward Island, Canada (Zone 5b)
1peislander
Aug 16, 2016 3:32 PM CST
Hi All,
As promised, I am reporting back on the hardiness of the listed daylilies.
Our winter was not an easy one on the daylilies; not much snow cover and some freeze/thaw weather. I took a few into the greenhouse.
Tusk (some was left outdoors)
Terry Lininger (which turned out to be NOT Terry Lininger!)
tet Terry Lininger
All those left outside survived!
There are a few that are NOID's, namely Oklahoma Sand Burr and Terry Lininger.
There are a few I'm not sure about yet:
Don't Mess With Me
Ledgerwood Cherries Jubilee
Jefferson Davis
Sacred Ibis
Dragonfly In Flight
Had a big problem with tarnished plant bug; anyone care to give some advice on how to get rid of those little pests????
Regards,
Linda
Name: Linda Curtis
Prince Edward Island, Canada (Zone 5b)
1peislander
Aug 16, 2016 3:37 PM CST
PS I took Dr.Mark C Laroche inside too. I'm not sure it's the right plant; certainly didn't look as good as the picture, but it may improve. We'll see.
Linda
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Aug 16, 2016 3:52 PM CST
Linda, there's some info on tarnished plant bugs on the AHS site. It's very hard to see the young nymphs but you can zap the adults early in the morning when they're dopey with insecticidal soap. I don't know if you can use anything "stronger" there in PEI, do you have a garden pesticide ban like we do in Ontario?

http://www.daylilies.org/ahs_d...

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