Gardening for Butterflies, Birds and Bees forum: Are there Variegated Milkweed cultivars?

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Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Dec 17, 2015 2:58 PM CST
I think they would really liven gardens up!
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
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DavidLMO
Dec 24, 2015 12:24 AM CST
I don't think there are any as species - could be wrong. There are over 100 types.

There is one that is apparently a hybrid - a variegated tropical milkweed called Monarch Promise. I know nothing of it.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/495184921507997890/

Some marketing blurb from the company selling it.

http://www.gpnmag.com/crop-culture-report-asclepias-monarch-...
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Dec 24, 2015 3:30 PM CST
DavidLMO said:I don't think there are any as species - could be wrong. There are over 100 types.

There is one that is apparently a hybrid - a variegated tropical milkweed called Monarch Promise. I know nothing of it.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/495184921507997890/

Some marketing blurb from the company selling it.

http://www.gpnmag.com/crop-culture-report-asclepias-monarch-...


I checked and it's for sale all over, thank you! Hoping Hardy species come in it soon too!
Name: Alex Junge
MN st paul, (Zone 4a)
Plantsmylove
Jan 3, 2016 7:22 PM CST
I'd be wary of designed plants whiteness in any plants a serious flaw by natural standards not to say they won't look good but its one thing to have domestic plants which are varigated quite another to breed native milkweeds unusually. Just my 2 cents
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
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DavidLMO
Jan 3, 2016 7:34 PM CST
I agree When I see things like this, I say "Why MUST you screw around with ......" Fill in the blank.

Since the underlying plant is apparently Tropical, it ain't hardy in much of the US so I hope they lose their shirt. As if there are not enough beautiful MW species to plant now. Feh. And I simply cannot imagine growing a MW for foliage (other than for cats!). Wonder what the Monarch Cats think of this?
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Jan 3, 2016 7:47 PM CST
DavidLMO said: I agree When I see things like this, I say "Why MUST you screw around with ......" Fill in the blank.

Since the underlying plant is apparently Tropical, it ain't hardy in much of the US so I hope they lose their shirt. As if there are not enough beautiful MW species to plant now. Feh. And I simply cannot imagine growing a MW for foliage (other than for cats!). Wonder what the Monarch Cats think of this?


Everyone owns some plant that has been altered in some way. I can't believe people find this offensive? I'm going to buy some. By the way there are monarch breeding programs for white butterflies instead of orange, guess they'll match this plant 😉
Name: Alex Junge
MN st paul, (Zone 4a)
Plantsmylove
Jan 3, 2016 7:55 PM CST
Everyone's intitled to there own opinions I just think it's strange
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
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DavidLMO
Jan 3, 2016 8:54 PM CST
keithp2012 said:
I can't believe people find this offensive?


Whatever. Opinions differ - one's is worth no more than another's.

I'm going to buy some. By the way there are monarch breeding programs for white butterflies instead of orange, guess they'll match this plant 😉[/quote]

Go for it - you will have to over-winter it indoors.

They do not have to breed white Monarchs if that is what you are referring to - they occur naturally.

Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Jan 3, 2016 9:43 PM CST
DavidLMO said:

Whatever. Opinions differ - one's is worth no more than another's.

I'm going to buy some. By the way there are monarch breeding programs for white butterflies instead of orange, guess they'll match this plant 😉


Go for it - you will have to over-winter it indoors.

They do not have to breed white Monarchs if that is what you are referring to - they occur naturally.

[/quote]

They are breeding more of them purposely I guess, yes you are right they do rarely occur naturally in the wild.

Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
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DavidLMO
Jan 3, 2016 10:07 PM CST
FYI....

http://monarchwatch.org/read/articles/nivosus.htm
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Danita
GA (Zone 7b)
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Danita
Jan 4, 2016 2:24 AM CST
As the gpnmag.com article about ‘Monarch Promise’ states,

"This very special Asclepias curassavica has beautiful green and white variegated foliage that is tinged with red, orange and pink leaf tips.... It was found by a butterfly breeder in Florida because she used it on her farm for its food source for her Monarch caterpillars."

It is just a spontaneous mutation, or "sport," of Asclepias curassavica that occurred on its own. It is not a hybrid or the result of humans tampering with its genetics.

http://www.google.com/patents/US20150150170
[Last edited by Danita - Jan 4, 2016 2:49 AM (+)]
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Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
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DavidLMO
Jan 4, 2016 1:54 PM CST
Ah. I had not seen that info. Thanks for posting. A sport. I withdraw any negative comments from above.
Wonder what its seeds produce?
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Jan 4, 2016 3:23 PM CST
DavidLMO said:Ah. I had not seen that info. Thanks for posting. A sport. I withdraw any negative comments from above.
Wonder what its seeds produce?


Well it says it's been grown from cuttings from a sport, so from seed probability for variegation is low, but not impossible.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 4, 2016 4:16 PM CST
I wonder how they think they can get a patent, if the plant came from a naturally occurring sport?

If another one grows spontaneously in my yard, and I propagate it I would think they'll have a very hard time proving that my plant is identical to their plant, and defending their patent.

But then .. . I think trying to get a patent on any plant is pretty dumb in the first place. People are going to propagate plants no matter, and give them to friends and family so what's the use?
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Danita
GA (Zone 7b)
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Danita
Jan 4, 2016 5:19 PM CST
I believe that you can get a patent on a plant if the mutation occurs in cultivation but not if it occurs in the wild. Of course, it also has to have characteristics that make it unique but I think those standards may be a bit loose considering how many patented plants of one species can look so similar.

If you had a plant that spontaneously mutated it would not be the same as their plant and would not be protected by the patent. Your plant would likely be different genetically to begin with unless the parent plant was the same cultivar/clone. Even if the original was the same genetically, the chance that the same exact mutation would occur would be exceedingly unlikely. It might look similar but genetically it would differ.
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Jan 4, 2016 7:18 PM CST
Danita said:I believe that you can get a patent on a plant if the mutation occurs in cultivation but not if it occurs in the wild. Of course, it also has to have characteristics that make it unique but I think those standards may be a bit loose considering how many patented plants of one species can look so similar.

If you had a plant that spontaneously mutated it would not be the same as their plant and would not be protected by the patent. Your plant would likely be different genetically to begin with unless the parent plant was the same cultivar/clone. Even if the original was the same genetically, the chance that the same exact mutation would occur would be exceedingly unlikely. It might look similar but genetically it would differ.


I've got two plants I could patent as I got them in my cultivation from seed, and the coloring mutation is not available in stores or anywhere, plus they breed fairly good from seed or cuttings. How does one patent plants?
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
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DavidLMO
Jan 4, 2016 7:23 PM CST
File an app at the Patent & Trademark office. It is so complicated, you likely will have to hire lawyers. The going rate in DC is > $ 500 per hour. Good luck
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Silver Spring, MD (Zone 7a)
Sedums Container Gardener Bulbs Vegetable Grower Hummingbirder Region: Mid-Atlantic
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ssgardener
Jan 5, 2016 5:54 AM CST
Rotary Botanical Gardens trialed 'Monarch Promise' last summer.

Here's their article on it, with some nice pictures!: http://rotarygardens.blogspot.com/2015/12/monarch-promise-mi...
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
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DavidLMO
Jan 5, 2016 10:58 AM CST
Interesting article. But Tropical MW is not an Annual - it is a perennial - not hardy in their Wisconsin zone. And there is nothing anyone can do to make it hardy - with out screwing around at the DNA/Gene level.

I'll pass on this one, thanks.
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 5, 2016 12:32 PM CST
Lots of tender perennials are used as annuals in the northern tier states and Canada, though.

Btw, who's that guy on this forum who keeps all sorts of tender perennials going in his basement . . . Angel
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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