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Jun 10, 2016 6:59 AM CST
Thread OP
Name: Terri
Hudson Valley, NY (Zone 5b)
Hey Everyone! I am planning to move to Ohio from New York at the end of this month, maybe early July. The movers won't move house plants, so I am thinking that I might need to rent a small uhaul to move all of them, lol. My bigger concern is moving my outside plants, namely the irises and daylilies. I know that generally the fall is the best time to transplant and move these flowers around, but unfortunately that won't be an option.

The irises have already bloomed, so I planned on cutting the leaves back when we get closer to the move. Do you think I'm better off putting them in pots with some potting soil, or just wrapping them in a damp cloth or newspaper? It will probably be about 3 or 4 days from when I would dig them up to when I would get a chance to replant them.

What about daylilies? They are just now starting to put up stalks to flower, but nothing has flowered yet. Do you think they are a lost cause and I should just leave them behind?

If it help, I don't have many of either variety. Maybe 4 or 5 different types of each.
allons-y!
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Jun 10, 2016 7:29 AM CST
Name: Jennifer
48036 MI (Zone 6b)
Cottage Gardener Houseplants Spiders! Heucheras Frogs and Toads Dahlias
Hummingbirder Sedums Winter Sowing Peonies Region: Michigan Celebrating Gardening: 2015
I move plants all the time, regardless of the "right" time. What works for me is that I pot things up and keep them in my "nursery" area. It gives me a chance to let them settle and recover. Then later I transplant them out when I find a spot, get a chance, or am forced to because the season is ending. Hilarious! I will say though that when I do did up plants I try to do it in the morning when it is cool and they are at their perkiest. And I water them right away after potting and keep them in a shaded spot for a few days.

I have dug and potted daylilies before and they bloomed in the pot.

I've done iris both ways.Mostly not potted. But not potting them I don't store them in damp cloth or newspaper. I just dig them and they sit in a box without dirt or water until I get to them. I cut all the dead dry leaves off and trim back the others. Once planted they grow new growth rather quickly.

In general plants are much hardier and sturdier than most people think.
Last edited by jvdubb Jun 10, 2016 7:37 AM Icon for preview
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Jun 10, 2016 7:36 AM CST
Name: Ken Ramsey
Vero Beach, FL (Zone 10a)
Bromeliad Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America Tropicals Plumerias Orchids
Region: Mississippi Master Gardener: Mississippi Hummingbirder Cat Lover Composter Seller of Garden Stuff
Terri, I am no expert when it comes to iris and daylily, but if I were moving plants from the ground and then re-planting this time of year, I think you have two choices:

1. Dig everything up, shaking off what soil will easily fall away, cut off 1/2 of the foliage, and wrap them in dry newspaper for the travel. You will lose the flowers this year.

2. Have pots with soil available when you dig the plants up and transplant the plants to the same depth as they were growing. Lightly water that soil. When you re-plant them, you will probably lose some foliage due to the stress of transplanting but you might have the daylilies flower. Daylilies seem to be tough plants.
drdawg (Dr. Kenneth Ramsey)

The reason it's so hard to lose weight when you get up in age is because your body and your fat have become good friends.
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Jun 10, 2016 8:03 AM CST
Name: Betty
MN zone 4b
Frogs and Toads Birds Hummingbirder Irises Lilies Peonies
Roses Garden Ideas: Level 1 Region: United States of America Hostas Garden Art Echinacea
I would just remove the soil from both the iris and daylilies wrap them in dry newspaper for the move. When you get to your new place the daylilies in a bucket of water which you change daily to rehydrate them until you get them planted also cut the scapes back and trim the foliage to help prevent shock to the plants. Iris are tough plants just replant them when you have time, I would also trim back the iris if they have long foliage.
If you want to be happy for a lifetime plant a garden!
Faith is the postage stamp on our prayers!
Betty MN Zone4 AHS member

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Jun 11, 2016 9:00 AM CST
Name: aud/odd
Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
I have moved an entire garden and 100s of houseplants. I was only moving about 15 min from my old house. The realtor said I would have a faster sale if I made the gardens smaller. I was not going to kill my plants so I dug them up.

I had styrofoam coolers on hand and went to the dollar store and picked up some more. Everything as dug up soil bushed off and wrapped in damp newspaper. Since you are moving in the heat the cooler and moist newspaper will help keep the plants hydrated and the coolers will keep them from cooking.

I do not think after you move you are going to have the energy or feel like planting immediately. So I would plan a temp solution. ....... The styrofoam coolers will be your friend at that time. Put some soil in them and plant until you feel like you can get in the garden after you unpack. Remember the coolers are not their permanent home so you can plant tight. I had 10 coolers planted all winter and that was a entire garden from a suburban garden. 50 hostas and lots of ferns, daylilies, iris and, and, and. Rolling on the floor laughing
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Jun 11, 2016 7:58 PM CST
Name: Sandy B.
Ford River Twp, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member Bee Lover Butterflies Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Greenhouse Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Cinta -- that was quite an ambitious project! Thumbs up
“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight." ~ Albert Schweitzer
C/F temp conversion
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Jun 14, 2016 4:02 PM CST
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier The WITWIT Badge Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages
Ahhh Plant love makes us perform unusual feats of gardening strength. Lovey dubby Thumbs up
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Jun 14, 2016 5:01 PM CST
Name: aud/odd
Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
Moonhowl said:Ahhh Plant love makes us perform unusual feats of gardening strength. Lovey dubby Thumbs up


Yes it does. nodding
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Jun 14, 2016 6:41 PM CST
Name: Sandy B.
Ford River Twp, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member Bee Lover Butterflies Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Greenhouse Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Enjoys or suffers cold winters
So true! Smiling
“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight." ~ Albert Schweitzer
C/F temp conversion
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