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Avatar for Blue06
Jun 25, 2016 8:25 AM CST
Cape Girardeau, Missouri
I recently found a different daylily blooming in a bed of "regular" lilies. Is it possible that these lilies created their own variation? I'll post pictures of both the regular flowers and the different one, in that order.
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Jun 25, 2016 9:50 AM CST
Name: Charley
Arroyo Seco New Mexico (Zone 4b)
Don’t trust all-purpose glue.
Garden Ideas: Level 1
Welcome Blue 60 Welcome!

Your daylilies alone probably didn't create a new "variation" all by themselves, however if you have seen a proud bee flying around your garden passing out tiny cigars you probably have been found the source of your new cultivar.

Hundreds of daylily folk hybridize daylilies, in fact so many do that it is estimated that there are 80,000 registered cultivars. Bees assisting daylilies are so good at creating progeny that hundreds of those registered cultivars just happen to be bee created, and of high enough quality to result in being registered.

Some hybridizers have to race out in the morning to beat the bees to their planned crosses for the day.

I'm trying to remember the hybridizer from Cape Girardeau (someone will help me) Get in touch with her and she will lead you to a club where folks will talk your ears off about hybridizeing.

Good luck!

Charley
I’d rather have questions that can’t be answered than answers that can’t be questioned.
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Jun 25, 2016 10:21 AM CST
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Raises cows Enjoys or suffers hot summers Region: Texas Plant Identifier
Blue06 said:I recently found a different daylily blooming in a bed of "regular" lilies. Is it possible that these lilies created their own variation? I'll post pictures of both the regular flowers and the different one, in that order.
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The 2nd photo is the interloper? That looks like one of the Kwanzo types that are invasive for many people under the right growing conditions. It may have traveled and found its way into the clump of the daylily depicted in the first photo. It hid and has now matured enough to start blooming. I don't think it would prove to be a variation. @admmad Maurice, what do you think?
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Jun 25, 2016 10:34 AM CST
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
I think Donald is correct! Those could have been grown in that bed several years ago and been all dug out, but a piece was left behind and is just now mature enough to bloom. Or, it could have spread into the other cultivars clump and been dug up with it. It definitely looks like a Kwanso/Flore Pleno type stoloniferous root type plant.
Last edited by Seedfork Jun 25, 2016 10:40 AM Icon for preview
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Jun 25, 2016 11:16 AM CST
Name: Maurice
Grey County, Ontario (Zone 4b)
I agree with Needrain/Donald and Seedfork/Larry.
Maurice
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Jun 25, 2016 4:56 PM CST
Name: Glen Ingram
Macleay Is, Qld, Australia (Zone 12a)
(Lee Reinke X Rose F Kennedy) X Unk
Amaryllis Hybridizer Canning and food preservation Lilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Orchids
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Welcome Blue06. Welcome! Welcome!
The orange Kwanzo is sterile but it can multiple in the soil and form very large clumps.
The problem is that when you are young your life it is ruined by your parents. When you are older it is ruined by your children.
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Jun 25, 2016 9:50 PM CST
Name: Kevin Smith
INDIANA (Zone 5b)
About 5 years ago i sold off a clump of unknown pink daylily and planted a new cultivar where the pink one was. Last year when the new one was blooming i noticed on of its scapes had a pink bloom and it was down low and shooting out from the side. So some of the pink got left behind but it was such a small amount of root that it took 4 years to mature into a fan,scape and bloom.
Sometimes when you think you got it all nature surprises you. Blue06, ditch the ditch lily. It will only suck nutrients and water and compete with your beautiful red one.
SO MANY DAYLILYS, SO LITTLE LAND
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Jun 26, 2016 7:27 AM CST
Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Bee Lover Ponds Peonies Irises Garden Art Dog Lover
Daylilies Cat Lover Region: Canadian Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Last summer, I dug up Raspberry Pixie from a spot that had become too shaded, and sure enough, a tiny daylily fan is coming up in the spot where I dug it up. I moved the whole clump, but must a left a bit of root.
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Jun 26, 2016 7:34 AM CST
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4b)
Annuals Native Plants and Wildflowers Keeps Horses Dog Lover Daylilies Region: Canadian
Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Daylilies can't regrow from root pieces so what gets left behind would have to be a piece of rhizome, or possibly but less likely a piece of crown. Seed is another possibility in some cases.
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Jun 26, 2016 7:40 AM CST
Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Bee Lover Ponds Peonies Irises Garden Art Dog Lover
Daylilies Cat Lover Region: Canadian Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters
How much would have to be left?
It hadn't bloomed for many years, and no other daylilies near it, so not likely seed.
Touch_of_sky on the LA
Last edited by touchofsky Jun 26, 2016 7:41 AM Icon for preview
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Jun 26, 2016 8:22 AM CST
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4b)
Annuals Native Plants and Wildflowers Keeps Horses Dog Lover Daylilies Region: Canadian
Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Not much, just a section of rhizome. Several shoots emerged from this broken off rhizome so even just a part would have regrown. These shoots grew after it was detached from the plant.

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Jun 26, 2016 9:05 AM CST
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
Keep in mind that most often when people refer to leaving a piece of root behind they are actually referring to a rhizome. They just don't know the terminology.
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Jun 26, 2016 9:23 AM CST
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4b)
Annuals Native Plants and Wildflowers Keeps Horses Dog Lover Daylilies Region: Canadian
Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Garden Sages Plant Identifier
From past experience I would have to disagree with you, at least on the "most often" part, Larry Smiling Are you thinking that most people believe a rhizome is a kind of root? Or that they know it is a stem but call it a root anyway?

Edited to add, IMHO it is important to make the distinction because otherwise new daylily gardeners might think any piece of root left behind when digging up a daylily could regrow. Not all daylilies have rhizomes.
Last edited by sooby Jun 26, 2016 9:28 AM Icon for preview
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Jun 26, 2016 9:44 AM CST
Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Bee Lover Ponds Peonies Irises Garden Art Dog Lover
Daylilies Cat Lover Region: Canadian Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Two pages from the daylily dictionary. Helped to clarify things a bit for me.
http://www.daylilies.org/ahs_d...
http://www.daylilies.org/ahs_d...
Touch_of_sky on the LA
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Jun 26, 2016 9:57 AM CST
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
sooby said:From past experience I would have to disagree with you, at least on the "most often" part, Larry Smiling Are you thinking that most people believe a rhizome is a kind of root? Or that they know it is a stem but call it a root anyway?
Yes, to both of those.
Edited to add, IMHO it is important to make the distinction because otherwise new daylily gardeners might think any piece of root left behind when digging up a daylily could regrow. Not all daylilies have rhizomes.


I think "new daylily gardeners" and those who are daylily growers for years and years, and even a lot of more "into daylily" growers would not know the difference and really will never bother to learn the difference. They just enjoy growing the plants. I can't name how many times I have spoken to old time daylily farm owners, who insist that daylilies "revert" back to ditch lilies, or Kwanso, or Flore Pleno or whatever was left behind in the bed.
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Jun 26, 2016 10:06 AM CST
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4b)
Annuals Native Plants and Wildflowers Keeps Horses Dog Lover Daylilies Region: Canadian
Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Garden Sages Plant Identifier
I don't think that's a reason not to try to inform those who do wish to understand the difference, though.
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Jun 26, 2016 10:07 AM CST
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
I agree 100%.
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Jun 26, 2016 5:11 PM CST
Name: Sharon Rose
Grapevine, TX (Zone 8a)
Grace of the Lord Jesus be with all
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@sooby Is there a list anywhere of daylilies with rhizomes? Is there an easy way to know if it is a daylily with a rhizome by just looking at them in my garden? Thank you for your help and have a joy filled week!
One to take to heart....1 John 4 ..............................................Where there is smoke...there is fire...in most cases the smoke will kill you long before the fire consumes you. Beware of smoke screens! Freedom is not free and when those who have not paid the price or made the sacrifice...think that only they are right and entitled to speak...they bring us tryanny.
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Jun 26, 2016 5:22 PM CST
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4b)
Annuals Native Plants and Wildflowers Keeps Horses Dog Lover Daylilies Region: Canadian
Butterflies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Garden Sages Plant Identifier
I don't know of a comprehensive list although it is probably most documented for the species and maybe some older cultivars. To a large extent it would be a trait that people have typically tried to breed out because it can be nuisance. The only easy way I can think of visually in the garden is if it gives itself away by popping up a fan away from the main clump. That's exactly what makes them a nuisance because it can result in cultivar mix-ups.

Interestingly I have a totally white fan of 'Variegated Kwanso' that has appeared about a foot or so from its parent, a known rhizomatous daylily. It's not growing well but is still alive so must be getting some nutrition via the rhizome or it would die, but not enough for a normal growth rate.
Avatar for Blue06
Jun 26, 2016 5:53 PM CST
Cape Girardeau, Missouri
I just discovered these growing in some of my other lilies, also. How do I go about completely removing them... Or at least moving them away (to the other side of the farm)... from my other lilies?

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