Ask a Question forum: Roma Tomatoes in July

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Anewvogue
Jul 8, 2016 10:41 AM CST
i have two tomato plants right now, one delicious tomato plant and one cherry tomato. I just realized I want to be able to make my own pasta sauce and I know Roma's are the best for pasta sauce but now it's July is it ok to plant one now? Will or grow fast enou
Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
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Zencat
Jul 8, 2016 10:43 AM CST
That depends on your location and weather. Where is the world are you located and what is your zone?
Name: Daisy
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DaisyI
Jul 8, 2016 10:54 AM CST
Welcome!

It all depends upon whether your growing season is long enough and the tomato's growing season is short enough.

Go to 'Zone Lookup' in the left sidebar. Enter your zip code and then go to 'the planting calendar'. That will tell you on average when your last and first frost dates are. If you can find a tomato that has enough days left, plant it.

For instance: According to the planting calendar, my first frost date will be October 3. That means my tomatoes have less than 90 days to produce fruit. If you look at the tags on tomato plants, there is always a 'days to maturity'. Those days start when you plant the tomato outside. If I found a tomato that had 56 days to maturity, I would get fruit. If I choose one with 90 days, I'm probably out of luck.

Daisy




Anewvogue
Jul 8, 2016 12:21 PM CST
Zencat said:That depends on your location and weather. Where is the world are you located and what is your zone?


I live in Binghamton NY, which is zone 5b

Anewvogue
Jul 8, 2016 12:25 PM CST
DaisyI said: Welcome!

It all depends upon whether your growing season is long enough and the tomato's growing season is short enough.

Go to 'Zone Lookup' in the left sidebar. Enter your zip code and then go to 'the planting calendar'. That will tell you on average when your last and first frost dates are. If you can find a tomato that has enough days left, plant it.

For instance: According to the planting calendar, my first frost date will be October 3. That means my tomatoes have less than 90 days to produce fruit. If you look at the tags on tomato plants, there is always a 'days to maturity'. Those days start when you plant the tomato outside. If I found a tomato that had 56 days to maturity, I would get fruit. If I choose one with 90 days, I'm probably out of luck.

Daisy





Here is mine:
Each winter, on average, your risk of frost is from October 9 through May 1.
Almost certainly, however, you will receive frost from October 24 through April 20.

You are almost guaranteed that you will not get frost from May 12 through September 24.

Your frost-free growing season is around 161 days.
Name: Rita
North Shore, Long Island, NY
Zone 6B
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Newyorkrita
Jul 8, 2016 3:28 PM CST
Anewvogue said:

I live in Binghamton NY, which is zone 5b


If you can find plants I say go for it. Very little to loose. Roma's are Determinate, which means they grow to their pre- determined height. Then they bloom and set lots of fruit all of which is ready for harvest in about a 3 week window. So I think it would work.
Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
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Weedwhacker
Jul 8, 2016 3:42 PM CST
Welcome to NGA, @Anewvogue !

You may be able to find some large potted plants at a garden center -- that would probably be your best bet at this point.

If you can't find Roma plants, don't be afraid to make your sauce from other types -- I really prefer using a mixture of varieties for more flavor. Smiling
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Name: Sheri Boyd
Albany Ga (Zone 8b)
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Sherib381
Jul 12, 2016 12:04 PM CST
Anewvogue said:i have two tomato plants right now, one delicious tomato plant and one cherry tomato. I just realized I want to be able to make my own pasta sauce and I know Roma's are the best for pasta sauce but now it's July is it ok to plant one now? Will or grow fast enou


I have an Opalka tomato plant that I use to make sauce but I have found that my sweet million and gardeners delight is a great tasting sauce, I slow roast my tomatoes. And ad a bit of garlic, just delicious. Drooling
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