Ask a Question forum: Please Help My Plant

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Name: Lindsey
Ohio (Zone 6a)
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ljones26
Aug 17, 2016 7:40 AM CST
Can someone help me heal this plant? It was all good but then the leaves started to shrivel and brown. I thought it was in too much light, so I moved it. Didn't work. I water it like my other succulents, about once every 1.5 weeks, but is that not enough? Thanks!
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Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
Charter ATP Member Garden Photography Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Foliage Fan Houseplants Frogs and Toads
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kniphofia
Aug 17, 2016 10:52 AM CST
I'd toss it. If it's been dried out it may be hard for it to recover, more so if it's been overwatered.
Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bulbs Foliage Fan Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents
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purpleinopp
Aug 17, 2016 11:44 AM CST
Is it a Senecio? If the stems are firm and it's losing older leaves prematurely, sounds like it's getting too dry. If the soil has plenty of air in it, letting it dry like one would for a cactus is unnecessary, harmful if too much too often. Shouldn't be possible for it to get too much light inside. The sun can only shine through any window for a few hours tops.
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Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
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woofie
Aug 17, 2016 12:05 PM CST
If the soil has gotten bone dry, you may need to submerge the pot and let it soak for a couple of hours to allow the water to penetrate the soil.
If the soil is too wet, you might want to take some cuttings to try to root in case you lose the whole plant to rot.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: J.R. Baca
Pueblo West Co. ( High Dessert (Zone 6a)
josebaca
Aug 17, 2016 3:43 PM CST
I don't grow succulents here, we have enough outside!, but judging by your hand compared to the plant and pot, could it be that it may be getting root bound? We call those types ' Seimpre Vidas ' ( Always living or Lives Forever ) but my sister has had to re-pot them from time to time.

Hope this helps.
Name: Lindsey
Ohio (Zone 6a)
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ljones26
Aug 18, 2016 11:51 AM CST
This may be a dumb question, but lately I have been really into getting succulent cuttings to grow roots in jars of water. Is there a possibility that I could get this to do that?
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
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RickCorey
Aug 18, 2016 5:53 PM CST
Hard to say without knowing the plant name. I'd suggest trying a few that way as an experiment. Since the plant seems to be struggling hard, some pruning couldn't hurt.

Have you considered putting some cuttings into sharp, barely moist sand? Maybe with just a little sphagnum or coir or bark added to hold a little water?

Since it may well be very root-bound, maybe try a root-division as you re-pot it. Split some off when you re-pot it, and pot up the (small) split piece into a (bigger) pot.
Name: J.R. Baca
Pueblo West Co. ( High Dessert (Zone 6a)
josebaca
Aug 18, 2016 6:00 PM CST
Looking at the plant, you may want to cut the top 2 or 3 inches, remove the bottom leafs and set the stalk with the new growth in moist cactus soil medium. You have a few stalks on your plant, so you may want to try a rooting hormone on a couple or so, my sister believes it isn't necessary so...........

Just to hedge your bets, I would keep what is left of the existing plant in a warm sunny location and hope.

I keep going back to your picture and I can't help but wonder if you're watering a bit much or maybe it's in more of a potting type soil. Nonetheless I can understand your desperation to keep it, houseplants are a lot like pets and pets, to me, ARE family. I truly hope for and wish you success . Good Luck. Smiling
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Aug 18, 2016 6:08 PM CST
I've read that the most a rooting hormone can do is to give a cutting that was taken at the "wrong" time or the "wrong" part of the plant almost as good a chance as a cutting taken at the "right" time and place.

That author was clearly dedicated to propagation! Many of his suggestions were like:

"In Year One, do these things to the plant: .....
In Year Two, do this: .....
In Year Three, take cuttings from THIS part ... and plant them like so ..."

He seemed to think that rooting hormones were cheating, or at least not necessary if you devoted your entire life to knowing each species and producing plants with young shoots that are eager as heck to put out roots.

Personally, I think the hormones might not be needed BY your sister or this author, but maybe ARE needed by an amateur like me.
Name: J.R. Baca
Pueblo West Co. ( High Dessert (Zone 6a)
josebaca
Aug 18, 2016 7:18 PM CST
I couldn't agree with you more, when you work for a sprawling school district, with a plethora of landscape goodies, you just CAN'T help yourself!, I go through a bottle of the stuff a year! But if you've ever had to deal with cactus you'd know that if you're out to get rid of it, cut it at the bottom - I use a scuffle how - and set it on a rock or piece of wood and let it dry out. I learned that if you just toss it and it lands on soil, you pretty much just transplanted the dagnabbed thing!

I had a jade plant that I wanted to propagate and give out to friends, luckily my sister was visiting, all she did was pull off a few leaves and stick them into the surrounding soil. Blinking . "Leave them there until you see new growth on the lower curve, then take them out and put into new pots." needless to say, it worked! Hurray!

I guess that if it's something thats special TO YOU, your best bet would be to use it, just for insurance if nothing else, but I have also seen plants get treated like rags and still thrive. Shrug!

Anyway thank you for the thumbs up! I really appreciate it. Thank You!

Name: Lindsey
Ohio (Zone 6a)
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ljones26
Aug 18, 2016 8:21 PM CST
Thank you so much everyone for all of your help! I do view my plants as family hehe. I thought originally that I was not watering it enough, as I barely watered it:/ Also, it is in a cactus/succulent soil mix! I will try to do some cuttings and use my root hormone (personally I am a big fan of it haha) to encourage some regrowth. Thank you! (:
Name: Lindsey
Ohio (Zone 6a)
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ljones26
Aug 20, 2016 8:04 AM CST
Alright, so I was going to transplant my plant and I pulled it out of the pot, and it had like NO roots left. Sad When I bought it it had a huge root mass, so I'm not sure how I murdered its roots. :/ So I unfortunately tossed it.
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
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woofie
Aug 20, 2016 8:26 AM CST
It may not be too late to salvage a few cuttings, though. Worth a try. Smiling
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Aug 22, 2016 7:43 PM CST
Lindsey, thanks for letting us know what the root ball looked like! I'm guessing that it was waterlogged long enough to drown the roots, but it might have been some soil disease or even root-eating pests.

If you have a compost heap, that's a great place to throw "dead" plants. Many come back to life, as if compost was an Elixir of Life.

Or, if the roots have "gone away", you could re-pot it into some small pot with faster-draining potting mix. Probably have to trim away many leaves and stems so they don;t drink water faster than roots can provide it. It might have come back.

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