Ask a Question forum: Kalanchoe plant help

Views: 370, Replies: 5 » Jump to the end

soobee620
Oct 19, 2016 7:53 AM CST
Hi,

I'm wondering if you can help me. I was given a kalanchoe plant about 6 years ago when I was sick. The plant was doing quite well, and I had it on a high shelf to keep it away from my cats (who were elderly and not very athletic). I lost those cats and got two new, very spry high jumpers who proceeded to knock the plant off the high shelf on numerous occasions. I took the plant to my office at work, but it was very small compared to what it had been, and all that remains now is a single stalk. I re-potted it into a smaller pot, and when I did, I noticed that it did not have any roots. So, my questions are: 1) Can I get it to grow roots, and if so how? 2) Can I get the stalk to become stalkS?

Thanks for any suggestions you might have.

Sue
Thumb of 2016-10-19/visitor/75db27

Name: Steve Claggett
Portland Orygun (Zone 8a)
Beekeeper Cat Lover
Image
madcratebuilder
Oct 19, 2016 8:55 AM CST
Hi Sue, welcome to NGA. I know about cats as I raise Bengals and have about 2 dozen kittens every year.

Now for your Kalanchoe, you may have lost the root system to rot. That could happen from over watering. This plant wants to be dry between watering and needs a fast draining soil.

This plant roots very easy from a cutting, you could cut the end with about 2 inches of stem and root that as a new plant. The remaining stem may send up new growth if it has a healthy root system.

Here's a photo of a four month old cutting, you can see new stalks forming at the base of the plant. Give the plant as much light as possible.
Thumb of 2016-10-19/madcratebuilder/ed37e8

Cats and plants can coexist.
Thumb of 2016-10-19/madcratebuilder/8fb8b0
Spectamur agendo

soobee620
Oct 19, 2016 1:15 PM CST
Hi!

Thank you so much for your answer! When you say "root that as a new plant" do you mean putting it in water to grow new roots, or simply re-potting it with the stem trimmed?

Sue

soobee620
Oct 19, 2016 1:24 PM CST
Follow up

This is what I found on the Clemson website:

"Start with clean and sterile containers and rooting media. A 6- to 8-inch plastic pot can be used to root several cuttings. Recycled pots should be washed thoroughly using a household cleaner and disinfectant. A good rooting medium consists of 50% peat moss and 50% perlite. Normally, peat moss and perlite don't need sterilization when new. Propagate from herbaceous stem cuttings in spring or early summer. Use vegetative shoots not flowering shoots for best rooting. Terminal cuttings for propagation should be two- to three-inches long with two pairs of leaves. Remove the bottom leaves from the cutting. No rooting hormone is needed. Allow the cutting to callus for several days before inserting into the rooting medium. Place the pot indoors in bright, indirect light and in a closed large plastic bag to maintain high levels of humidity. Cuttings should be established enough to transplant in 14 to 21 days."

What exactly does this mean: Allow the cutting to callus for several days before inserting into the rooting medium.

Name: Steve Claggett
Portland Orygun (Zone 8a)
Beekeeper Cat Lover
Image
madcratebuilder
Oct 19, 2016 2:10 PM CST
Allow the cutting to callus means you want the cut end of the stem to dry or callus. This help in preventing rot. The 50/50 peat/perlite mix should work or you can use a commercial "Cactus/succulent" soil mix. I would use a 3-4" pot at the largest, a large pot stays wet for too long of period.

Placer the cutting directly in soil, no water for a few days and then keep on the dry side. I use a cactus mix, and place the cutting in part shade, no afternoon hot sun. I do not use a plastic bag to keep high humidity. Kalanchoe root very quick and easy for me.
Spectamur agendo

soobee620
Oct 20, 2016 12:40 PM CST
Thank you!!!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by TBGDN and is called "Autumn Acorns"