Ask a Question forum: Fillers for a big container

Views: 585, Replies: 9 » Jump to the end
Virginia (Zone 7a)
Rez
Oct 23, 2016 6:12 AM CST
I've got a pretty big container that I want to turn to my elephant ear's new home. It's pretty deep so I put plastic containers and glass bottles on the bottom of it and then covered that with air bags from postal packages. They covered about have of the volume of the box but I see a problem: if I move the box the bottles would move and also the air bags would eventually loose their air and result in a little "landslide" that can unsettle the plant.
Any thoughts?
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Peonies Lilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters Winter Sowing
Bulbs Region: Canadian Garden Ideas: Master Level Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
CarolineScott
Oct 23, 2016 6:39 AM CST
I would use vermiculite to fill in around the bottles.
Plastic milk jugs work as fillers too.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Oct 23, 2016 4:01 PM CST
Are you growing your Elephant Ear in a giant water garden? Or just potting it up? How do you keep it damp enough?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
Image
greene
Oct 23, 2016 6:16 PM CST
Don't know much about elephant ears in pots but...
I use empty aluminum cans placed with the open end down to fill the bottom of huge pots. I add a layer of landscape fabric, then another layer of cans. This does not any extra weight to the container and is easy to move when necessary.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Oct 23, 2016 7:09 PM CST
I assume your plant is in a plastic pot and that you are putting that inside the larger container. If so, you could use flat Styrofoam or floral foam on the bottom to raise up the plant to the appropriate level. Then, fill in the space around the sides with Styrofoam peanuts used for packing and available at stores that sell packing material. You want something that is light weight, but sturdy and also water proof.

For a nice finishing touch, Spanish moss spread over the surface will disguise all the engineering below!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Bob
Vernon N.J. (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Database Moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Heucheras Echinacea
Hellebores The WITWIT Badge Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: New Jersey Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
NJBob
Oct 23, 2016 8:04 PM CST
I agree shipping peanuts work great. If you have a friend who work at a store ask if they get any in their deliveries. The local Rite Aid has given them to me a couple of times. I just would not use them if you are growing anything edible in the containers.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
RoseBlush1
Oct 23, 2016 8:46 PM CST
I live in a very small town in the mountains and those materials are not readily available to me. I have been wondering what I could use that would also be light weight.

I have several plants that I should have gotten planted in the ground this fall, but just didn't get to them while doing other fall chores and will have to try to over winter them in large containers. Right now, they are root bound in gallon nursery cans. ... Sad
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Oct 23, 2016 10:36 PM CST
I have used floral styrofoam and really liked it. With that in mind I put some styrofoam peanuts in as filler in a cache pot for elevation. This particular type of peanuts turned into a disgusting dissintegrated goo when it made contact with water. I know some do work, but some don't too.

Greene, I am going to use your can idea. Great tip.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
Image
greene
Oct 24, 2016 11:50 AM CST
Some of the packing peanuts are 'biodegradable' and are made from corn starch - yes, they dissolve when in contact with water. The aluminum cans work for me because they weight nothing, cost nothing and when I am finished using them in the planter I can still clean them and toss into the recycle bin. No harm.

Oh, @WillC - I like the Spanish Moss idea !! Thank You!
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Virginia (Zone 7a)
Rez
Oct 25, 2016 7:50 AM CST
I just put some glass bottles and plastic containers on the bottom, a little bit of packaging airbags on top of them and then soil. The soil depth is uneven though. It's not heavy and the internals do not move when I move the box. I hope the plant gets enough ventilation (there are 4 holes on the bottom of the box.)
Thumb of 2016-10-25/Rez/08a7e3

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by Marilyn and is called "Cestrum 'Orange Peel'"