Fungi forum: Anyone know what these are?

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Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Hostas Ferns Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Forum moderator Region: United States of America
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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RickM
Oct 23, 2016 3:59 PM CST
We were out working in the yard today and came across a little surprise. We had an oak tree removed from the spot about 5 years ago, so I assume that has something to do with it. There are rhododendron behind them.

Thumb of 2016-10-23/RickM/b85bfb Thumb of 2016-10-23/RickM/5ac917

I know nothing about wild fungi, so I wouldn't think to taste them, But, I figure that the chipmunk and squirrel are going to be snacking on them tonight!

Thanks for any help

Name: Myriam
Ghent, Belgium (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Organic Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Frogs and Toads Plant Identifier
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bonitin
Oct 26, 2016 1:18 AM CST
It looks like a Honey Mushrooms (Armillaria sp) in a young stage.
Pretty but deadly harmful for trees, maybe your Oak tree was removed because it was dying?
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Hostas Ferns Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Forum moderator Region: United States of America
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
RickM
Oct 26, 2016 5:31 AM CST
Thanks Myriam!

Actually, the tree was dying, but more from old age. I couldn't tell you the age of the tree because the arborist ground down the stump. He did it for free because they cut another tree out back all the way to the ground, even though they were told to leave a good 10-15 foot tall 'stump'. That tree looked to be around 115 years old. The one that was ground down was much bigger.

When ever we have to take down a large tree, we like to leave at least 10 feet still there. It gives the illusion that there's still a tree. Over time, it also provides 'shelter' for many bugs, which the birds love. When it finally breaks down to the point that it has to be removed before it falls over, I just push it over and move the pieces to a debris pile that eventually goes through the chipper.
Name: Myriam
Ghent, Belgium (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Organic Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Frogs and Toads Plant Identifier
Image
bonitin
Oct 26, 2016 9:38 PM CST
Over 100 years is still young for an Oak tree to die.
An estimated 1000 year Oak in the UK.;
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

It could be that the tree(s) got infected with the mycelium while the fruit bodies (the actual mushrooms) didn't show up yet..and that can take years..

A shame indeed the arborist did cut them down to the ground, depriving wildlife of many resources.
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Hostas Ferns Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Forum moderator Region: United States of America
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
RickM
Oct 27, 2016 5:58 AM CST
Our development was built back in the 1960s. At that time, there was a pioneer roadway and cemetery that went through what is now our yard. But with the introduction of the heavy equipment, construction, ground disturbance, etc., well, you get the idea of how stressed the trees were just to survive. To top it off, we had a stretch of hot summers with little rain, which didn't help.

The tree that the fungi are coming up from was actually two trees that had grown together from ground level up to about 4 feet, where they separated, leaning in opposite directions. . At one time, we had an arborist actually put cables in to keep them from splitting due to winds. At that time, I think there were about 80 feet tall. That worked for about a decade, and then the part that was most severely had had enough and we had it removed. The other part hung on for a few more years. Here's a pic from 2008 with the tree(s) on the left. (Yes, that's a planter in the split.) UNlike a couple that we've had taken out, this one/two weren't hollow in the center, just having issues with leaning.

Thumb of 2016-10-27/RickM/921a0d

In general, the trees are trying to cope. About 8 years ago, we had 28 trees of varying sizes removed from our 1/2 acre lot. Today, you can't tell. (A couple were aging oaks, but the majority were 'scrub' trees. We have oaks in various stages of development, from 3-4 y.o. seedlings to the massive suckers.
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Apr 4, 2017 7:13 PM CST
ok I just ran across this thread, and am I understanding that these mushrooms are harmful to the trees they grow near to? I have never heard such a thing before. Why are they harmful, what do they do? Are there others that are bad to have around trees? I had no idea!

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