Lilies forum: Dividing Lilies

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Leeds, UK
Floo
Oct 24, 2016 10:33 AM CST
I'm dividing my Asiatic lilies, do I chop all the roots off?

Thumb of 2016-10-24/Floo/f620e3

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Oct 24, 2016 11:07 AM CST
Woah! That is a lot of roots!

Is the lily dormant? I would carefully dig through that mess and look for bulbs. You can tell how many you will find by the number of stems you had. Be carefull not to damage them.

It could be that once you get through the outside layer of roots, you will find the center of the 'root ball' relatively root free.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
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Leftwood
Oct 24, 2016 3:04 PM CST
If they are asiatic lilies, the bulbs will something like these:
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Roots growing from the stem above the bulb(s) can be discarded. They will die in the fall if they haven't already.
The roots originating from the bottom of the bulb(s) are fairly permanent. You will want to keeps as much of these intact as possible. But don't be too concerned because it's not critical. Even if all the roots were removed, the lily would still easily survive.
Leeds, UK
Floo
Oct 25, 2016 2:29 AM CST
Thank You!
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Nov 16, 2016 8:08 PM CST
I moved some Red Alert (Longiflorum Asiatic) into a mixed garden today. They have already started new sprouts for next Spring. Keep in mind these new sprouts are very tender and break easily if you are moving Asiatic or Longiflorum Asiatic bulbs around at this late date. Also be careful where you step so to avoid damage to established bulbs already in the ground. These sprouts will stop growing as soon as the soil temperature drops to near freezing. And it won't hurt them even if the soil does freeze a little around them. Smiling
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My first casualty of the season-that crunching sound


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Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
Leftwood
Nov 16, 2016 9:21 PM CST
I had dug some Lankon bulbs about 3 weeks ago. They looked like that, too. Some I had not replanted and they sat in a partially open plastic bag, where they were exposed to light. Some of the small bulblets started to grow green leaves.

Many other types of bulbs, like tulips, daffodils and fritillaria will "pre-sprout" like that as a rule.

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