Convenient Method To Overwinter Annuals: Yes, the plants do fine in styrofoam.

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Convenient Method To Overwinter Annuals

By SherriRaye
November 3, 2016

In the fall, I have always brought in cuttings from my annuals to overwinter and to have ready for my window boxes and pots for spring. I would grow them in 4-inch plastic pots on my windowsills covered with tin foil, which created a mess, and if I wanted to move them to another location, it took quite a while to move all of the separate pots.

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Name: josephine
Arlington, Texas (Zone 8a)
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frostweed
Nov 2, 2016 7:45 PM CST
I grow many plants in foam cups and they do just fine.
Very nice system you have there. Smiling
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Name: Donna King
Selmer, TN (Southern West TN) (Zone 7b)
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donnabking
Nov 5, 2016 1:17 AM CST
You will have no problems with styerfoam. I have used the cups myself many times with no problems.
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Bpassino
Nov 5, 2016 3:14 AM CST
What type of annuals do you use? Is the cutting just a stem? Thanks
Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
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canadanna
Nov 6, 2016 8:42 AM CST
Timely article. I am taking cuttings now too. I know I have received cuttings in the solo cups as well, which are a little bigger.
When you take a cutting, make sure there are 1 or 2 nodes on the stem. Depending on the type of plant, don't remove the leaves or cut them in half.
I take cuttings of Begonias, tender succulents and varieties of "wandering jew" or Tradescantia
How about you?
Name: Sherri Page
Granite Falls, WA (Zone 7b)
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SherriRaye
Nov 7, 2016 10:46 AM CST
canadanna said:Timely article. I am taking cuttings now too. I know I have received cuttings in the solo cups as well, which are a little bigger.
When you take a cutting, make sure there are 1 or 2 nodes on the stem. Depending on the type of plant, don't remove the leaves or cut them in half.
I take cuttings of Begonias, tender succulents and varieties of "wandering jew" or Tradescantia
How about you?


I usually take cuttings of my impatiens, coleus, and begonias. My front door is on the north side of our house so I typically have shade plants in pots, urns, and window boxes that I take cuttings from.

[Last edited by SherriRaye - Nov 7, 2016 10:49 AM (+)]
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Name: Sherri Page
Granite Falls, WA (Zone 7b)
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SherriRaye
Nov 7, 2016 10:53 AM CST
Bpassino said:What type of annuals do you use? Is the cutting just a stem? Thanks


I bring in coleus, impatiens, and begonias. The front of my house is on the north side so typically I bring in cuttings of plants that do well in partial shade.

I cut off about a 2 to 4 inch length from the top of each stem, depending on how closely the leaves are situated, leaving several of the top leaves on the cutting and remove leaves from the bottom inch or 2. The nodes left where you removed the leaves are where the roots emerge so its important to leave several of these on the cutting. Then I root them in a glass bottle with a narrow top filled with water or place the bottom portion in rootone and plant them in the potting soil.
[Last edited by SherriRaye - Nov 7, 2016 11:42 AM (+)]
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