Ask a Question forum: Passiflora caerulea

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Leeds, UK
Floo
Nov 9, 2016 6:00 AM CST
I have a young Passion flower in my yard, it has snowed overnight. Should I tidy it up now and bring it indoors for the winter? It still has a few unopened buds.
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Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Nov 9, 2016 9:15 AM CST
Floo- I believe your passion flower is hardy to zone 6 but in a pot, it's more susceptible to cold. Don't know how cold it gets where you are but I think I would bring it indoors.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Nov 9, 2016 10:04 AM CST
I agree Absolutely, whisk it into the house so it doesn't freeze. The flower buds may open for you indoors, but they surely will not if you leave it outside.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Leeds, UK
Floo
Nov 9, 2016 12:18 PM CST
Thanks guys, I had the mother plant in the same yard although it was in the ground. But it didn't survive what was a particularly cold winter. Recently we've had a lot milder winters but I'm not going to risk it as my cutting failed.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Nov 9, 2016 12:24 PM CST
I did grow a couple from seed and tried growing them in big pots. I couldn't get them to bloom. The one that I did plant in the ground in a south-facing protected spot did bloom but didn't survive the winter either. Kinda glad that it didn't as the next attempt in a pot had the roots escaping the drainage hole and growing into the soil underneath. Had little plants coming up in my little GH next to that area. Last winter was mild but the two before that were cold. Gave up on them in my zone. I have heard that you can stretch the zone on these by piling some straw or leaves over the spot but not sure about that.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Leeds, UK
Floo
Nov 9, 2016 1:16 PM CST
How hardy is Jasmine polyanthum? I also have a small one in my yard, should I bring that inside?
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Nov 9, 2016 2:52 PM CST
Hi Floo, it depends where you are - please fill in your profile with your location so that we can answer your questions better? Just a zone doesn't help much.

When you 'push the zone' on tropical blooming plants like passis and jasmine, they can *survive* winter with a deep mulch sometimes but it means that every year the plant has to grow back from the ground up, so it will be a small plant and late to bloom each year. Better to pot up and bring them in for the winter, because then when you put them out in spring once the weather is warm, they jump right into growth and bloom generously. Some will even give you two or three flushes of bloom per summer if the weather stays warm.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Leeds, UK
Floo
Nov 10, 2016 9:11 AM CST
I live in Leeds, UK. This is the Jasmine, it looks like 4 plants growing close together. Is it worth trying to split these and pot up individually or should I just put the whole lot in a bigger pot?
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Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Nov 10, 2016 11:32 AM CST
Sorry, I have no experience with potted jasmine, they grow as landscape plants here. They do put up suckers from the roots like that and you can divide them if you want to give away plants. But just looking at your plant and that root ball, I think I would keep it as one plant and pot it up. You may do more harm than good cutting it apart.

The reason I think this might be best is because otherwise you will very quickly have 4 plants the size of the one you have now, and that might overwhelm your indoor space before spring weather is warm enough to put them out. Keeping it as one clump, it will stay a more manageable size. You can also root some cuttings if you want new plants.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Leeds, UK
Floo
Nov 10, 2016 11:39 AM CST
Thank You!

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