Ask a Question forum: Chrysanthemum snapped, what next?

Views: 492, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end

ChrysKid
Nov 22, 2016 6:53 PM CST
New to this site because I'm an amateur gardener and wanted to ask a question about my chrysanthemum (hence the name, haha). So, like the subject title says, my plant snapped completely. As in the stem was blown by the wind and snapped, then fell over. Without thinking, I cut the remaining stem close to the bottom of the pot it was in. Not sure if I was supposed to do that, but I did, so what now? If I let it be and wait for growth in the spring, do I keep watering the plant, even though there's no apparent growth anymore? What about in the winter where there's snow and frost? I'd really appreciate the help!
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
Image
sallyg
Nov 22, 2016 7:17 PM CST
Where are you gardening? I assume this will be planted in the ground?
You do want the roots to stay moist through winter. Once they are well watered in, if it is cold there, they won't need much added water.
Some chrysanthemums come in a peat moss mix that can dry out too much Be sure the soil covers the whole root mass.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Nov 23, 2016 10:24 AM CST
I agree and put it where the pot wont get frozen. In spring you migth want a bigger pot and put a stake in it. Stake it even if you put it in ground. They need it. When it broke.if it didnt break off completely. you could of left it lay there and bloom! REALLY!###
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Nov 23, 2016 11:44 AM CST
Welcome! ChrysKid. As Sally mentioned, it would be helpful to know where you are even if only roughly. You mention snow and frost, so if it is a cold winter climate it would also help to know what kind of Chrysanthemum it is because not all of them will survive outdoors. For example the Mums that are sold in pots in fall in my area rarely survive the winter even if planted in the ground.

ChrysKid
Nov 23, 2016 3:05 PM CST
Hey guys! I really appreciate the replies and welcoming. :9 I live in Canada, bought the plants which came potted for my mum's birthday (can you guess why? Haha!) last February I believe, and they were growing in our balcony, on the ninth floor of our apartment. Last winter they were small enough to keep inside, no problem with pests or dust. Not sure exactly what type, but I think they're known as hardy mums, with regularly incurved petals. They're purple, but I don't think that's an important detail. I should probably mention that they were infested by green aphids two weeks prior. I was treating the plant by spraying the flowers and leaves with a dish soap and water solution. This seemed to help, but unfortunately I think the bugs weakened the stem. Could I still have left them to grow even though the plant was infested? And does this mean that the flowers still have a chance of coming back?
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Nov 24, 2016 7:52 AM CST
If it's a hardy chrysanthemum then like Sally I would assume you are planting it in the ground? It won't be as hardy in a pot outdoors as it would be in the ground. If you're bringing it in for the winter in the pot then it should start to regrow eventually from the base. The breakage probably had nothing to do with the aphids, these plants tend to be brittle and snap easily regardless. For future reference I would not have cut off the remaining stem though assuming it still had leaves that were feeding the plant.

If you bought them in February in Canada they may not be hardy, but that depends where in Canada you are (do you have any idea of your hardiness zone if you don't want to give a location - even province would help, there's a huge difference between, say, northern Ontario and Vancouver BC for example. The USDA zones in Canada cover a range from 1 to 9.

Edited to add, the plant will have to regrow enough before it will flower, and flowering in Mums is dependent on daylength.
[Last edited by sooby - Nov 24, 2016 7:58 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1323669 (6)

ChrysKid
Nov 24, 2016 3:16 PM CST
They started to grow buds I think last month, and opened up a week ago maybe. Hm, I was growing them in a pot because we don't have much space in our balcony, but good to know. It's funny because there was no tag specifying what kind of chrysanthemums they were, I wish I knew! I live in southern Ontario, but I have no idea what hardiness zones are, I'll have to look them up! Thanks for the information, you guys!
Name: Treehugger
Hanover Twp, PA (Zone 6a)
Region: United States of America Region: Northeast US Region: Pennsylvania Native Plants and Wildflowers Miniature Gardening Herbs
Enjoys or suffers cold winters Bee Lover Hostas Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Frogs and Toads Hummingbirder
treehugger
Nov 25, 2016 10:13 AM CST
Did you ever wonder why the mums you buy in pots are so full of flowers and the same plant planted in the ground the next year is taller and not as full? The best rule of thumb is to keep pinching back the stems as they grow. Every time you pinch a stem two stems will form , pinch those two back and you now have 4 stems etc. This method keeps the plant low growing and not as easily damaged by wind and also produces many more flowers. Caution though never pinch back the stems after the beginning of July. The plant needs time to grow and form buds for late summer and fall blooming. I've been doing this for years. Hopefully this may help you with you stems breaking.

ChrysKid
Nov 26, 2016 3:06 PM CST
That's pretty cool, I'll take your word of advice! Thanks!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by ge1836 and is called "Oriental Poppy Manhattan"