Roses forum: New books about roses

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Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
csandt
Nov 27, 2016 7:27 AM CST
Does anyone know if there are any new books about roses, especially disease-resistant roses, in the queue for publication in the near future?
Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Nov 27, 2016 11:51 AM CST
Carol, I have this book:
http://garden.org/ideas/view/M...
Here's a list of suggested roses from the book for Northeastern and Atlantic states:
Brothers Grimm, Cinderella, Crimson Meidland, Knock Out, KOSMOS, Larissa, Oso Easy Cherry Pie, Peach Drift, Poseidon, Purple Rain, Rosanne, Ruby Ice, Therese Bugnet, Thrive! Lemon, Topolina and Wedding Bells.
Here's a list from the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden (2013):

http://www.nybg.org/gardens/ro...
Click on the 2013 tab.

I have selected many of my roses from the Peggy Rockefeller rose list and from the above mentioned book and ALL have done well. For example: the author recommends The Fairy, Mandarin Ice and Dark Desire for the South Region - all look magnificent here on Northeastern Long Island.
Many years ago, I made the mistake of thumbing through beautiful rose catalogs of pretty depicted rose photos selecting and imagining them in my own garden only to be disappointed. I based my selection on the photographs - big mistake, HUGE mistake. I learned I had to stop "wishin and hopin". My suggestion is to obtain a list of roses grown in a nearby rose garden like Longwood Gardens.
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
csandt
Nov 27, 2016 1:10 PM CST
MargieNY said:Carol, I have this book:
http://garden.org/ideas/view/M...
Here's a list of suggested roses from the book for Northeastern and Atlantic states:
Brothers Grimm, Cinderella, Crimson Meidland, Knock Out, KOSMOS, Larissa, Oso Easy Cherry Pie, Peach Drift, Poseidon, Purple Rain, Rosanne, Ruby Ice, Therese Bugnet, Thrive! Lemon, Topolina and Wedding Bells.
Here's a list from the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden (2013):

http://www.nybg.org/gardens/ro...
Click on the 2013 tab.

I have selected many of my roses from the Peggy Rockefeller rose list and from the above mentioned book and ALL have done well. For example: the author recommends The Fairy, Mandarin Ice and Dark Desire for the South Region - all look magnificent here on Northeastern Long Island.
Many years ago, I made the mistake of thumbing through beautiful rose catalogs of pretty depicted rose photos selecting and imagining them in my own garden only to be disappointed. I based my selection on the photographs - big mistake, HUGE mistake. I learned I had to stop "wishin and hopin". My suggestion is to obtain a list of roses grown in a nearby rose garden like Longwood Gardens.


@MargieNY,

Yes, I have avidly read, re-read, studied and nearly worn out the book you mentioned. I LOVE this book! I planted four fragrant rose cultivars from it in the spring of 2016, and all have done very well so far. I am just hoping for a follow-up book of a similar kind, with additional cultivars that may not have been tested in the Peggy Rockefeller Garden but are equally worthy.

Perhaps a follow-up could include some winners from the Biltmore Trials, AGRS, AARS and ADR trials. Example: Sunshine Daydream, a 2012 AARS winner that was tested under sustainable growing conditions and which I added this fall. I understand that some regional Earth Kind trial results (e.g., the trial currently underway at Scott Arboretum in Swarthmore, PA) will be available in 2017, so it would be nice for them to be included.

Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
[Last edited by csandt - Nov 27, 2016 8:09 PM (+)]
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Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Nov 27, 2016 2:17 PM CST
Have you read this article?
http://www.vancouversun.com/li...
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Nov 27, 2016 2:32 PM CST
Just wrote to Peter K. and asked him if he had plans to write a followup book with more rose recommendations. I have written to him before but never received a response. Maybe he will write back this time.
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
csandt
Nov 27, 2016 5:05 PM CST
MargieNY said:Have you read this article?
http://www.vancouversun.com/li...


@MargieNY,

No I had not read that wonderful article.Thank you for alerting me to it. I am so grad to know about this breeding program for very cold-hardy roses that are also very disease-resistant. I hope that some of them can also take the hot (90 degree plus) summers that are common here in Pennsylvania. The only one of my four new cultivars chosen from Peter K.'s book that sailed through the summer without producing brown-edged flowers was Savannah. That one was recommended to Peter K. by someone in Texas. Are your summers somewhat more moderate than mine?
Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Nov 27, 2016 8:05 PM CST
The summers here are hot and very humid (90's). Black spot is prevalent - runs rampant. Drought has been another problem to contend with - reflected in a higher water bill.
A couple of years ago, I read an article that horse manure helps reduce black spot. Last Fall I was conversing with someone from Palatine Roses. The discussion lead to the type of materials used to hill up roses for winter protection (topsoil, compost, mulch etc.). And than she mentioned - "and 1 shovelful of horse manure". Last Fall I added 1 shovelful of well rotted horse manure to each rose bush. This one time application appeared to result in much less blackspot than previous years.
I am impressed with the work of Dr. Rumen Conev at the Vineyard Research Center, however, I will continue to nurture my favorite roses utilizing the manure each Spring and Fall.
I have no answer as to why the manure seemed to help eliminate the blackspot. Did it effect that particular strain of fungi? Changed the pH? Strengthen the immune system of the plant to ward off the spores/infection?
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Nov 27, 2016 9:21 PM CST
My roses get regular feedings of horse manure and still get black spot each spring. By summer it is too hot for it, but the fungus often returns with cooler fall temperatures. Perhaps without the manure the problem would be worse, but I've never experimented. Fresh horse manure is also supposed to reduce die back. I have not been able to confirm that either. We may all be dealing with different strains of the diseases.
Porkpal
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Nov 27, 2016 10:27 PM CST
Porkpal, that's an interesting observation. I applied the manure for the first time last Fall and had no blackspot in the Spring or throughout the summer. Typically I have it in the Spring and the Fall when the temps drop. I didn't see any this Spring or summer until the Fall (only one time period instead of two). Not only are the temps lower when it appears but it always seems to happen after a hard Fall rainfall. Maybe during the hot summer, the spores are multiplying like crazy. And than when it finally rains in the Fall, the raindrops splash the spores all over the plants and the b/s shows up. Perhaps the key is to spray the roses with a mild solution of baking soda and water (alkaline) early in the morning during the hot summer months to cut down on the spores.
I have already applied the manure this Fall AND will do it again in the Spring. I'll keep you abreast of the results. Thanks for taking the time to write and discuss this matter.

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