Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: Sedum Treleasei Dying ??

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California
abeille
Nov 27, 2016 6:22 PM CST
Hello!

I've had my sedum treselei for a few months now, but recently its "leaves" have been turning yellow from the bottom up and falling off continuously. The original 4 bunches are now very scarce and naked looking. I figured I was over watering it, and held back a bit but that didn't slow it down. I tried watering it more, switching out the soil, and changing its locations (maybe being directly by the window was too cold for it) but nothing seems to be working.

This probably has a very simple solution, but I just wanted to know what I was doing wrong or if there's anything I can do to help save it? Thank you so much for your time!
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Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
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plantmanager
Nov 27, 2016 8:42 PM CST
I'm interested in the answer to this, too. I've always had a hard time with sedums and think I do overwater.
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Nov 27, 2016 10:45 PM CST

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It's not a big deal to have some stem showing, but the rosettes getting smaller might mean the plants are not well rooted (could be related to the varied history you have described) or they're not getting enough water. That would be my guess. The four rosettes look like they still have plenty of life force. Once you find the right rhythm they should be just fine.

Unglazed clay pots can dry out quite fast if they're in the sun, or in a low humidity situation. For that reason I avoid them in favor of regular plastic pots for plants I don't know that well. You can place the clay pot inside a slightly larger plastic or ceramic one and reduce the effect. The difference relates to the way clay pots dry out through the sides and not just from the top. I know from trial and error that some plants (eg. Aeoniums) are not at all pleased with the clay pot lifestyle, at least when grown on the dry side, as is my custom. Shrug! So I have learned to be careful who I put in a pot like that. Smiling
North Myrtle Beach SC (Zone 8b)
Succulent_lover
Dec 11, 2016 7:18 PM CST
I just started growing succulents early this year and have learned a lot of lessons but my treleasei has never given me problems. I've hardly watered it the few months I've had it. So maybe over watering is the problem. The bigger the leaves the more water they hold so they have been pretty self sufficient
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Dec 21, 2016 10:23 AM CST
Hello abeille, I grow some sedums and from what I have seen with them, it undergoes that cycle of drying out older lower leaves as seasons change from warm to cold. I grow mine outdoors, and they love our mild winter conditions here. But I do grow them in a very gritty media, since we got more rains in winter. Then come the arrival of Springtime, it will undergo another cycle of that leaf drop, it is its way of adjustment. When the sedums starts to show that much stem in Spring, that is the time I cut it off, dry out the cutting and root it back into the media. They go somewhat dormant here during our extremely dry and hot months and resumes active growing when cooler conditions return.

With your plant, more watering is not the answer, keep your media more draining and grittier. Protect the base of your plant, if you can add some pumice, crushed granite (chicken grit) or mix in more perlite. As long as that stem remains firm and green, there is a chance, that it may still grow new leaves at each of those nodes, but typically new growth is often from the center tip.

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