Ask a Question forum: Perennials

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carontregs
Nov 28, 2016 12:25 PM CST
We just got a new landscaping in our backyard. We live in Contra Costa County – Walnut Creek, California. The climate is pretty dry and hot in the summer (100 during the day) and very cold in the winter – down to the 30s in the evening.
A gardener told us we'd have to replace our perennials in about three years. Is this true? We thought they would just keep coming back every year.
[Last edited by carontregs - Nov 28, 2016 10:58 PM (+)]
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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Nov 28, 2016 12:40 PM CST
Hello carontregs, eventually you may have to, just depends how nasty our dry hot weather goes year after year, which perennial plants you have planted and how you take care of them. There are just some plants that grow so much better in the cooler Bay area side than in our thermal heat/cold inversion side.

I know how you feel, we get same conditions here and we are at the beginning part of Central Valley. So pretty much my garden looks happier in Spring and in Fall, in between, it is survival of the fittest, the one that endures the heat best will last longer.

Try to read this link, it will help you understand more about perennials: http://garden.org/courseweb/pe...
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Nov 28, 2016 2:13 PM CST
I suspect Tarev has bigger temperature swings than you do. I lived in Oakdale, CA for 30 years where summer highs were 105 - 110 and winter lows were in the 20's. My relatives who live in that area have much more lush landscaping than I ever did.

If your landscaper planted perennials not suited to your area, they may last only 3 years. But there are so many wonderful plants that would do great there, I'm not sure why he would.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Composter Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener
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tarev
Nov 28, 2016 3:05 PM CST
I would suggest you get to know your new plants there carontregs, so you will know what type of watering you need to provide. With our still ongoing drought, a lot of emphasis is brown is the new green approach, so hopefully what was planted in your backyard are drought tolerant perennial plants.

Depending too on your city's watering guidelines, that is one of the greatest challenges these days especially once our long dry and hot weather returns.

[Last edited by tarev - Nov 28, 2016 3:06 PM (+)]
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carontregs
Nov 28, 2016 10:59 PM CST
Thank you everyone for your feedback about Perennials!
Caron

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