Ask a Question forum: Bringing Dipladenias indoors in Autumn

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Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada
donnafund
Nov 28, 2016 7:14 PM CST
I had purchased a stunning huge upright dipladenia plant which thrived and flourished outside in direct sunshine all summer in Toronto climate. I was advised to re-pot and bring plant indoors before the frost. Plant has not only lost all its flowers but is also losing its leaves at a rapid rate. I do not have direct sun in any of my rooms; however, I have it in full-window getting tons of natural light. I have also had a grow-light shining on it. Even without sun I thought I could keep it green all winter at least and bring outdoors once again next May, 2017. I am keeping soil moist however the leaves are beginning to brown and fall. Should I cut right down to soil or will I hurt the plant?

Any feedback graciously appreciated!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Nov 28, 2016 8:19 PM CST
Hi Donna,

I have never grown a Dipladenia but have grown Mandevilla (very similar and same care) and they are tough in the winter. I'm not sure why you were advised to repot just before the plant was going dormant. I would have suggested any repotting be done in the spring.

Some will argue with me that they don't go dormant but mine always did. And surviving the winter is the tricky part of keeping these plants. They need full sun but dryer conditions in winter with temps above about 45 degrees. If you bring them in too late in the fall, they die. If you over water in fall, they die. If you don't give them full sun, they die. Sighing!
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Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
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plantmanager
Nov 28, 2016 8:41 PM CST
I agree with Daisy. I'm fighting with one again this winter. I never have luck keeping them in the house over the winter. They lose all of their leaves, and sulk, and usually end up tossed. I can't keep them happy indoors, but they do very well outdoors all summer or in a greenhouse.
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Name: Anna Z.
Monroe, WI
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AnnaZ
Nov 29, 2016 7:20 AM CST
I have 2 of my own in hanging pots that do very well in the g'house. I cut them back when I bring them in and they are shooting out nice bunches of new tendrils. I have 4 that I overwinter for clients...........2 of those I cut back and the other 2 I didn't and they are all doing well.
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Cactus and Succulents Plays in the sandbox Greenhouse Sempervivums
Bromeliad Adeniums Avid Green Pages Reviewer Brugmansias Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tropicals
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plantmanager
Nov 29, 2016 9:23 AM CST
I think houses are just too dry for them. Maybe they could be placed over a tray of water like an orchid and do better.
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Name: Anna Z.
Monroe, WI
Charter ATP Member Greenhouse Cat Lover Raises cows Region: Wisconsin
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AnnaZ
Nov 29, 2016 10:25 AM CST
I guess I should have clarified my comment that the 2 belonging to clients that I did not cut back were looking really good, and I saw no need. No dead leaves, etc. in the middles of them. And they are still blooming profusely.
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Cactus and Succulents Plays in the sandbox Greenhouse Sempervivums
Bromeliad Adeniums Avid Green Pages Reviewer Brugmansias Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tropicals
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plantmanager
Nov 29, 2016 10:40 AM CST
Mine is in the greenhouse now hoping it will recover from it's stint in our dry home. It is just a stick with no leaves at all. I'm not giving up hope. I love that thing when it blooms!
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Name: Deborah
midstate South Carolina (Zone 8a)
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Deebie
Nov 30, 2016 10:39 AM CST
Karen, I've overwintered mine in the house. They do lose nearly all of their leaves and look bare, but as long as the roots are alive, the plant should come back in the spring. So do not give up. I suppose that if I cut mine back when I bring them in, they may not go into so much shock. Shrug! But in any case, do spritz the leaves regularly if in dry conditions indoors or a greenhouse, because spider mites love them and the favorable dry air. By the time you see the webs, you have a bad infestation and the plant may be close to death. I like the idea of adding a saucer of pebbles to humidify the air and will try that.

I had one in my living room window that was doing very well and did not shed it's leaves, but when I returned from a short visit over the weekend, I saw fallen leaves. I did water it before I left, as I knew that the soil was going dry. Maybe I should not have. Whistling It's amazing how dry some plants prefer to be over the winter. It's all a learning process. Sighing!

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