Ask a Question forum: My norfolk pine is tipping over

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carmeldyer
Nov 29, 2016 8:00 PM CST
I have the north fork pine for over a year. I must confess I let it get too dry. It is still green and the needles are soft and appear to be healthy. I know they don't like to be transplanted. It is 3 feet high and in the original plastic pot it came in. The soil has shrunk away from the sides around an inch. What should I do?
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Nov 29, 2016 8:21 PM CST
Knowing where this tree is would make a difference in the answer. If it were in my zone 10, I would say get it in the ground fast, but in colder zones, that is probably the wrong answer.
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Cactus and Succulents Greenhouse Sempervivums Bromeliad
Adeniums Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tropicals Xeriscape Garden Art Plumerias
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plantmanager
Nov 29, 2016 10:33 PM CST
I agree, we need to know where you are, and if this will be planted in the ground, or treated as a houseplant. Here is info on having them in the house.
http://www.gardeningknowhow.co...
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Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Dec 1, 2016 11:18 AM CST
To bad you let it dry out. 😬
Yes !!! In ground. Repot. Or for time being get some fresh soil in it where soil has pulled away.
If its leaning. Stake it. If its falling over. It needs a bigger pot. Oww!!!
What am i saying ????!!!!###
Sounds like it needs a bigger pot and a stake !!! Whew!! Thats my opinion ! 😎😎😎
Pic and location of where you put it Wether inside or out. Be good too.
Toodle doo !!! 😎😎 Welcome!
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Dec 1, 2016 5:05 PM CST
Before you transplant to a heavier, maybe larger pot, set the pot (plant and all) in a container of water to rehydrate the existing potting mix and give some moisture to the plant. Only let the pot sit in water for maybe 10 minutes and then lift the pot out to drain completely. This will also help the plant survive any transplanting you may do.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 3, 2016 9:03 AM CST
If it is in a pot, I assume you are keeping it indoors. When soil of potted plants gets very dry, it tends to shrink away from the sides of the pot. That does NOT mean it needs a larger pot. Simply tamp the soil back around the sides to fill in the spaces and then water a bit more frequently so it doesn't get that dry again.

If the main stem is not vertical, then gently re-position the rootball in the existing pot so it is vertical and no longer leaning. A slight adjustment is probably all that is required.

If the plant and pot are tipping over and straightening it does not solve the problem, then put the nursery pot inside a larger heavier planter (ceramic or terra cotta) that will provide the ballast needed to keep it from falling over.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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