Ask a Question forum: 3 fruit trees not producing

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FadyChedid
Dec 10, 2016 11:57 AM CST
Thumb of 2016-12-10/FadyChedid/570be4

Hi sir,
I have 3 fruits trees in my backyard in beiruth Lebanon zone 10,11 12,13.
1st tree is an apricot tree
2nd tree is an sweet cherry tree
3rd tree is a plum tree
All of them are 7 years old and theye don’t produce any fruit.
Would you please tell me how I can take a good care of them?
Thank you and have a good day
Fady Chedid
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Dec 11, 2016 9:52 AM CST
Hi Fady, and welcome to garden.org. A few questions before offering you advice - you say that your zone is "10, 11, 12, 13" but that sounds as if it would be a much too warm and tropical zone (if you refer to our USDA zones) for you to grow this type of fruit.

Could you please tell us how cold it gets where you are in winter, and for how long it stays cold? Do you ever get frost, freezing weather, or very cold spells? I am sure your summers are very hot and mostly dry, aren't they? That would be good weather for these fruit trees.

Plum, apricot and cherry generally require a couple of months of dormancy - when they would lose all their leaves and not grow at all in the cold weather. Then they bloom, and set fruit on new growth in the spring. But there are some new types that need a shorter dormant period than the older varieties. So, now another question - do you know the specific varieties of your trees?

Another question would be about the raised border that the trees are growing in, against that pretty wall. What direction does the wall face? If it were facing south, your trees would then have full sun all day, which is needed for trees that make fruit. But if it faces north, in spring and fall the bottom parts of the trees would be shaded all day. East or west facing would give them half a day's sun only. I see that they are tall enough now that the tops of the trees would get most of the day's sun so that is also good, and you might get good fruit at the tops of the trees but it has taken them all this time to get tall enough to reach the light.

What is the soil like in that bed, and do you add enrichments such as compost regularly? Also how much water do the trees get? Trees of that age should have a large root system that would certainly stretch out beyond the bed underground if there is enough soil, water and nutrients out there. Otherwise the root systems may be stunted by lack of room to spread.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

FadyChedid
Dec 28, 2016 3:17 PM CST
Hi Sir,
Thank you for replying me. I don't think that I am sure about the zonig where the trees are but I am sure about the following:
- In winter time, +1°c --->+15°c
- In summer time, + 15°c --->+ 27°c
- 3 months for each seson
- 700m above the sea level
- no frost, no freezing weather, or very cold spells.
- In summer time the weather is nice
- I don't know the specific varieties of my trees.
- In summer time the trees would have full sun all day but less in winter time
- I just fertilized my trees for the first time this summer with cyntetic fertilizer because I didn't't have experience at that time.
- Sandy soil.
- This is the 1st year that I added compost
- beyond the bed underground  there is no enough soil because of the rocks, I think that the root systems may be stunted by lack of room.

I am sorry Sir , but this is my trees situation.
Can I do anything?
Thank you Sir and have a good day.
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Dec 28, 2016 7:57 PM CST
Absolutely, you can help your trees. Add as much organic material as you possibly can to the soil. There's no such thing as "too much compost" especially if your soil is sandy. The organic fibers help the soil to retain moisture because they absorb it like a sponge and release it to the tree slowly. Alfalfa pellets are my favorite soil amendment, and are readily available as horse food. But if you can get compost of any kind, get as much as you can.

I'm sure that their roots are stunted because of no room. If you can, move the edging out away from the wall and put a lot more really good soil around the bases of the trees. Also add mulch about 20cm deep, some sort of wood chips, or even straw or hay as a covering over the soil. It will help it to retain moisture, prevent soil erosion by heavy watering or rain, and insulate the soil from the heat of summer to help keep the roots cool.

You really do need to fertilize regularly, at least twice per season. First time is in spring when the leaves are just starting to come out. Second time is in summer after the fruiting season is over - or if you don't know when that is I'd go for late July. Use a good, granulated, balanced fertilizer (where the 3 numbers on the label are all the same or similar). Don't fall for the "fertilizer spikes" as they give too much fert in one place, and not enough to all the roots.

Water generously and in hot weather you probably need to water daily, deeply, early in the morning so the plant can take up the moisture before it evaporates off in the heat of the day. Have you had your water tested for pH? If the water is too alkaline, it can actually prevent the plant from absorbing nutrients.

Both when watering and when fertilizing, remember that the trees roots extend out around the tree at least as far as the branches reach so water the whole area under the tree, not just near the trunk. Spread the fertilizer out there, too.

Not much to be done about the sun, but as long as they're getting most of the day's sun during the growing season, they should be able to bloom and fruit. As they get bigger, you can cut off lower branches that don't get very much sun because they will not bloom or fruit and aren't helping the tree much.

Hope this helps, and good luck. Be sure to come back next summer and let us know how they are doing?
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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