Plant ID forum: Mystery conifer

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Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Dec 18, 2016 11:17 AM CST
I purchased this many years ago as a weeping Alaska cypress. It does not appear to be that. Now trying to correctly ID the tree for the database and also for My List.


Thumb of 2016-12-18/Bonehead/4e849b Thumb of 2016-12-18/Bonehead/c30095 Thumb of 2016-12-18/Bonehead/c77627

A second question is what is causing this yellowing? It runs throughout the tree, mostly on the inside closer to the trunk.

Thumb of 2016-12-18/Bonehead/6b99a7

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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Dec 18, 2016 7:33 PM CST
Well, it sure isn't weeping.

Have you ever seen cones? That should be the clue to what it is. My first thought was Incense Cedar (Calocedrus decurrens). Their cones look like flor de lis while Cypress would have a little round cone.

Oops, forgot the yellow center. Evergreen trees never lose their 'leaves' but the leaves do get old and die - usually in the fall and winter. That's what is happening to your tree. If the tips start to yellow, then you have a problem.

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[Last edited by DaisyI - Dec 18, 2016 7:41 PM (+)]
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Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
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Leftwood
Dec 19, 2016 6:37 PM CST
DaisyI said:Evergreen trees never lose their 'leaves' but the leaves do get old and die - usually in the fall and winter.


Well I know what you mean, and probably Deb knows what you mean, but every new gardener's head is swimming in confusion after reading that statement! You can't have a tree that never loses leaves, if leaves get old and die and fall off in the fall and winter. Blinking

Allow me to make some sense here:
Evergreens trees don't lose their "leaves" (or needles) every fall, but the leaves do get old and die (in about 2 to 12 years) - usually turning in the fall and winter.

But yes, the yellow in the above pic is a normal process.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Dec 19, 2016 7:26 PM CST
Thanks Rick Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Plant Identifier
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Silversurfer
Dec 20, 2016 2:06 PM CST
I am not sure that it is entirely sensible to plant a conifer that will grow huge, right next to a house.
Conifers need a lot of water and in dry years can cause the ground to shrink as the ground dries up.
After rain the ground can expand again.

This expansion/contraction can cause problems with the foundations/cracks in walls etc.

My advice would be to remove it straight away before it gets any larger.

https://www.google.co.uk/searc...

http://treesunlimitednj.com/wp...

Do look at this link for guide lines..


http://www.subsidencebureau.co...
[Last edited by Silversurfer - Dec 20, 2016 2:36 PM (+)]
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Name: Mary
Lake Stevens, WA (Zone 8a)
Near Seattle
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Pistil
Dec 20, 2016 4:27 PM CST
Oh, sadly I agree with Silversurfer. Whatever it is, it wants to be really big :-(
How about some closeups of the scales in a spray, for more chance of ID? These trees with little scales can be hard to identify, but magnification really helps.
I really like the red bark.
Arkansas (Zone 8a)
CaMidltn68
Dec 22, 2016 12:40 AM CST
The bark favors that of my brother's white cedar tree. Lightning hit it and so he had to cut it down. Shame too, it was still growing. Only 8 to 10 foot at the time and about 36 to 42 inches in diameter.

He fertilized it twice a year with a special blend that a nursery made for him. But he now lives further out in the country where he has several of them in the back yard. They give off great shade during the Arkansas Summers.
Name: Sherry Austin
Santa Cruz, CA (Zone 9a)
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Henhouse
Dec 23, 2016 1:02 AM CST
I don't think it's a Calocedrus.. There's a really nice close up in this link.
http://www.backyardnature.net/...

I wonder if it's a Chamaecyparis.. maybe a form of obtusa??
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Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Dec 27, 2016 7:57 PM CST
I believe it is a Chamaecyparis obtusa (Hinoki cypress), probably will never figure out which cultivar. So disappointing to get mismarked plants, particularly when the growth pattern is so much different than what I was expecting. Sigh.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Dec 27, 2016 8:33 PM CST
The good thing about Hinoki cypress is that you can prune them to any size/shape.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Dragonflies
Spiders! Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Fruit Growers Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Bonehead
Dec 27, 2016 8:40 PM CST
This tree is almost as tall as our house, and the north side (where it is located) is 3 stories. So, I don't think pruning for size control is in the cards at this point. So far, I have not noticed any adverse effect to it being planted so close to the foundation, and we have had our septic tank (about 15 feet from the main trunk) exposed a couple times for maintenance and I've not seen a problem with roots. I do think I will prune back some of the branches that interfere with window viewing but otherwise will probably just let it be what it is.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Dec 27, 2016 9:15 PM CST
I didn't know Hinoke cypress were even sold in the original species tree form in America. I've only seen the dwarf cultivars for sale in catalogs. If you can get a good pic of the underside of the needle-scales, Chamaecyparis is quite distinct from Thuja. I could tell you if it is one or the other.
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Dragonflies
Spiders! Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Fruit Growers Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Bonehead
Dec 27, 2016 10:00 PM CST
I don't buy much of anything mail-order, just from local nurseries. This particular tree came from a local PNW nursery which is now out of business so no help there. It was supposed to be a slender tree (it's not) similar to what I call 'dentist office trees' - those relatively expensive ones often used in professional landscaping. And it is definitely not a dwarf. I'll get out and take a pic of the underside later this week and will post that. I also saw there are some cones on the tree and I'll post some pics of those. A bit of a treasure hunt. Thanks for the help.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
Leftwood
Dec 28, 2016 3:05 PM CST
Cones would make it even easier to ID the genus.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Dec 28, 2016 5:33 PM CST
If it was originally a grafted plant (slender) on a species understock, the understock could easily have overtaken and consumed a slower growing scion. No surprise there, if true.

More detailed images will help ID what you have now...
John
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Dec 28, 2016 6:12 PM CST
Pretty tree; it reminds me of Arborvitae (Thuja).
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
Dec 29, 2016 5:19 PM CST
Are evergreens normally grafted?
Porkpal
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Dec 29, 2016 6:07 PM CST
Some are normally grafted, mostly because they are difficult to root or it is an easier/quicker route for propagation by a grower.
Others are normally rooted from cuttings.
(This is the short answer. Smiling )
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Dec 29, 2016 8:40 PM CST
Thanks, I never knew.
Porkpal
[Last edited by porkpal - Dec 29, 2016 8:41 PM (+)]
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