Ask a Question forum: Rose pruning

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Blackburn004
Dec 25, 2016 5:10 PM CST
I have an old English garden rose called rose de rescht a David austin rose. All the stems are VERY old at least 4 years old and they're all covered in moss it has not been pruned properly . So I cut back a few of the stems right to the ground to try and promote new growth . Was this the right thing to do ? Is there anything else to do ?
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
Dec 25, 2016 5:45 PM CST
Unless it is spring where you live, your timing is a bit off. Most roses that require pruning do best if it's done in the early spring as they are starting to put on new growth. Once blooming roses can be pruned right after they have finished blooming, whenever that is. In any event your rose will probably be fine. The moss on the old canes show you that they were no longer growing actively, and new growth is likely to be more vigorous.
Porkpal
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Dec 25, 2016 6:33 PM CST
Welcome! Like Porkpal I would have waited until spring, unless it's spring where you are, but I'm more concerned that you cut them right to the ground. I'm not sure what the stems will do if you cut below the lowest node, especially if it is grafted, but since it was only a few perhaps it won't be a problem.
[Last edited by sooby - Dec 25, 2016 6:35 PM (+)]
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Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Dec 25, 2016 7:33 PM CST
Are you certain of the name of your rose ? The rose named 'Rose de Rescht' is an old garden rose classified as a damask perpetual that was discovered and introduced in 1900.

You may have purchased the rose at David Austin's nursery and that may be why you think it is an Austin rose.

A damask perpetual rose, as other old garden roses, is generally pruned right after flowering.

Since this is one class of the ogrs that do have some repeat bloom, they often pruned in late winter or early spring. As a class of roses, damask perpetuals are not as tender as most modern roses and they do go dormant during the winter months and store their nutrients in their roots, so doing your pruning this early in the winter will not harm the rose. However, it probably would have been more effective had you done this kind of pruning closer to the beginning of the growing season.



I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Dec 25, 2016 8:03 PM CST
David Austin lists it is a Portland rose from 1840:

http://www.davidaustinroses.co...
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Dec 25, 2016 9:06 PM CST
Sue,

Often old garden roses are listed in several classes. R de R is listed as both a portland and a damask perpetual in commerce.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Dec 25, 2016 9:47 PM CST
Supposedly the ARS doesn't recognize damask perpetual, or so I was reading a little while ago on the Santa Clarita Valley Rose Society's page for that cultivar (it sounds from that as thought Austin doesn't quite have the date right):

"Rose de Rescht has been considered by some to be a Damask Perpetual and was originally marketed in America as such. However, the ARS doesn't include that class. Therefore, it is now classified in Modern Roses XII as a Portland because it does rebloom."

From:
http://scvrs.homestead.com/Ros...

Sounds like a nice rose, and apparently might be hardy here Smiling

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