Ask a Question forum: orange tree not flowering or fruiting

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amhaydock
Jan 9, 2017 12:43 AM CST
Hi
I have four citrus trees planted in a line next to each other:

a lime tree that is about 3 years old and is flowering heavily and fruiting
an orange tree with one fruit on it and only had a couple of flowers on it, its about 5 years old.
a lemon tree with many flowers and developing fruit about 5 years old
An unknown citrus tree (bought house in April last year so no idea what these trees were for while till they fruited) under a plum tree which has gone very long and lanky (trying to get to the sun) and has bora (as do all of them).

All have shaded to mid sun during the day due to tall trees around. i.e. not full sun all day, but say for two - three hours a day.

The lime and lemon have responded well to fertiliser. The orange and the unknown haven't.
We are in a sheltered back yard, so wind isn't an issue as such (hence why the others have fruited and haven't had the flowers blown off).

Soil is volcanic so is good soil, i.e. no clay and fairly good. drains well but not to fast. so not a water log issue. They are watered about every two - three days for about 30mins on a spray timer.
Orange tree leaves are nice and green however have sooty mildew on them due to aphids. I sprayed all trees with neem oil and it killed all aphids and white fly very well. so this isn't an issue any more either.
There is a leaf curly issue on a number of leaves on the orange also, but don't seem to have any insect in them.

Any reason this fruit isn't flowering and fruiting? (mainly interested in the orange tree? the other tree under the plum tree doesn't get enough sun due to the plumb tree foliage and i will move to a more sunny albeit not that sunny position)


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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Jan 9, 2017 11:18 AM CST
Hello amhaydock, your first photo looks like my calamondin tree. My calamondin here in my location, enjoys and prefers lots of direct sun and high humidity. During our very long dry months, I have to water my plant almost everyday, it is such a water hog here, due to our very low humidity levels during the long dry months that lasts for about 7 months, no rain. I grow mine in a container on the sunniest side of my garden and initially first year no blooms, but come 2nd year and forward it bloomed and gave me lots of fruits. I wish I can provide it more sun, but I get shaded by 2pm by our city trees, but it does get full morning sun for about 4 hours. The shade it gets is actually not bad either too, since by summer our temps are exceedingly hot, triple digit very dry heat. It only suffered big time last summer when we were away for about a month, and I thought I killed it, but it is now coming back and actually enjoying our rainy winter right now even if we dip to the low 30's sometimes. Rain is just very good for it.

You said your soil is volcanic, so that should be good for it, it grows very well in my homeland where our soil is also volcanic in origin and with constant and sustained high humidity levels, and lots of rain.

So if you can reposition your plant to a sunnier side, that may help your plant much better.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 9, 2017 11:58 AM CST
Let them get a little older before expecting fruit. Some citrus take up to 15 years to produce. But you can hurry the process along with proper care and a good location.
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Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 9, 2017 7:15 PM CST
It would help a lot if you could post some pictures of your trees, and also tell us where in the world you are. There is a space in your personal profile to insert your city/country so that it will show in all your posts.

I agree, you might just have to wait a little longer for fruit from those young trees. But if you can cut back the taller trees around them to give more sun that will certainly help. Most fruit trees need at least 6 hours of full sun to produce fruit dependably.

Removing some of the competing trees would help even more because it's not just the lack of sun that the bigger trees are causing, they are also spreading their roots towards your citrus trees and robbing them of nutrients and water. Make sure there are no other plants within the area around the citrus trees, as well. They have shallow, fine feeder roots, and even lawn grass will set back a developing citrus tree by eating up the fertilizer and water that the tree needs.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jan 9, 2017 10:07 PM CST
I keep going back to photo #4 and thinking a bad case of scale.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 10, 2017 8:38 AM CST
Citrus greening disease also makes motley leaves like those. We need to know where these trees are because if they're in FL it's more than likely that's the cause of all the woes.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

amhaydock
Jan 11, 2017 3:24 AM CST
hi there, thanks for your reply's. photos are loaded and so is location t somehow its not showing? location is Auckland New Zealand. warm weather in 20's in summer sometime getting over 30 degrees celsius. Generally lots of rain in winter and dry in summer. Ill check out the scale problem and see if it fits. thanks again
Al

amhaydock
Jan 11, 2017 3:27 AM CST
Just checked out the solution to scale and Neem oil is advised. I have been spraying with Neem oil over the last 6 weeks so this should sort it. does scale effect a tree flowering?
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 11, 2017 9:43 AM CST
Al, are you making use of the "Upload an image" button below the dialog box where you type your posts? It usually works well even for a tablet or mobile phone.

As to the scale, if there is enough of an infestation, yes they love to suck on the flower buds as well as the tender green stems. If you have a hand lens (magnifier) take a look and see if you can see any little bumps along those green stems, and if you can, try dislodging with your fingernail. They will be either green or brown usually.

Neem is a good product, but I've found it gets less effective as I use it more. Thinking maybe some of the bugs here are resistant to its insecticidal effect. Just a regular horticultural oil might be more effective - the goal is to actually smother the scale insects with the oil, since their little shell protects them from most direct contact insecticides.

Be sure to wash down the plant once in a while with a very dilute soapy water solution, too. This will keep the oil from building up on the plant and blocking the pores on the leaves.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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