Ask a Question forum: transplanting quaking aspens

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Washington (Zone 7a)
dougscott
Jan 12, 2017 10:37 PM CST
I'm trying to transplant suckers from aspen trees. should I prune them down to a shorter length ,there isn't many roots on them now ?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 12, 2017 11:29 PM CST
Welcome!

Aspen trees can be grown from suckers when a piece of root is attached. They also grow from just a piece of root. I'm not sure about a sucker with no roots, though.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
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Leftwood
Jan 13, 2017 10:27 AM CST
Quaking aspen suckers are just difficult to transplant. Expect a much higher percentage of casualties than normal. I would figure on planting two or three times as many suckers as you want trees.

I would leave the sticks be without cutting them down any. And unless the buds are swelling, I don't think this is a good time to transplant. When the buds swell, the roots are active, there will be more food reserves in your transplant from the tree roots and transplant shock will be lessened.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jan 13, 2017 4:51 PM CST
But remember, when you plant one Quaking Aspen, you have planted a forest. Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Washington (Zone 7a)
dougscott
Jan 13, 2017 10:57 PM CST
Thanks a lot I appreciate the info. I've had cottonwoods grow by sticking branches in the ground but never aspens. I was given these bare root and some are 6 to 10' long.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Jan 14, 2017 12:17 AM CST
Oh! If they originally came from a nursery, or someone who had rooted them, then you should have better luck. I thought you were digging them in the wild.

And I assume you meant 6" to 10" (inches, not feet) Whistling Hilarious!



Washington (Zone 7a)
dougscott
Jan 14, 2017 12:05 PM CST
They were taken out of the wild. They are 6-10' .
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jan 14, 2017 12:13 PM CST
In the spring, go back to that Aspen forest and dig up a piece of root that's 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick, cut it into pieces and plant the pieces.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
Leftwood
Jan 14, 2017 4:29 PM CST
dougscott said:They were taken out of the wild. They are 6-10' .


Oh my....

Transplanting any tree that size from the wild is very difficult because you get so little of the total root system. With your suckers it would be even less. I think I would expect 90+% mortality. Cut the trees down so that if they leaf out, there is only half the leaves it otherwise would have produced. This doesn't mean you need to cut half the height off. You could substitute lower side branches.

If the tree turns dry and crispy (dead wood), then cut it down to with a few inches of the soil, but don't dig out the roots. Later in the summer it might resprout from the soil.
Washington (Zone 7a)
dougscott
Jan 15, 2017 3:40 PM CST
I think my best chance for my situation is Left woods suggestion, but I have enough trees to try everything. I'm restoring about 4 acres and planted a lot of trees with various degrees of success .I'm retired and have access to water so I've been able to baby a lot of them along. I can't plant too small of trees because the grass shades them out and if I try to keep the grass low the deer chow down. My biggest problem is my conifers, in the fall the deer tear them up . Again thanks for all the advice.

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