Herbs forum: Iresine ? useful herb ? how ?

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Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
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CarolineScott
Jan 24, 2017 6:53 PM CST
Is Iresine a useful herb?
Iresine herbstii, Purple Lady, is the ornamental I am wondering about.
Name: Linda
Carmel, IN (Zone 5a)
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mom2goldens
Jan 24, 2017 7:19 PM CST
I have to confess to never having heard of this......off to Google Smiling
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
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CarolineScott
Jan 25, 2017 9:23 AM CST
Sorry--I just obtained seeds so do not have a photo of a plant.
Some googling gave me the idea it was "medicinal" and I think there was a note on leaves being edible? But I can not find anything specific
as to whether it is toxic?
Name: Liz Shaw
Gilbert, AZ (Sunset Zone 13) (Zone 9a)
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LizDTM
Feb 25, 2017 9:51 PM CST
Iresine herbstii

Iresine herbstii belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. It is commonly referred to as bloodleaf, chicken gizzard, beefsteak plant and herbst's bloodleaf. Bloodleaf native to tropical South America was probably first collected in Brazil. But it is available in the tropical forest in several parts of India and tropical Asia. I. herbstii are traditionally used in the Northern Peruvian Andes for black magic with the ritual aim to expel bad spirits from the body (De Feo, 2003) and in association with San Pedro for magic rituals (Dobkin De Rios, 1977; De Feo, 2003), to diagnose various illness.

Nencini et al. (2006), evaluated the central effects of I. herbstii which interacts with the Central Nervous System (CNS) receptors and this study confirmed the ritual use of I. herbstii. According to them, methanolic extract was able to interact with the central 5-HT (2C) and D1 receptors, whereas aqueous extract showed affinity for D2 receptors. I. herbstii was reported as an additive of ayahuasca (Bianchi and Samorini, 1993), as an ingredient of San Pedro decoction, with possible hallucinogenic properties (Schultes and Hofmann, 1973). I. herbstii leaves are used as wound healing, anticancer agent (Sebold, 2003), post-labor tonic (Srithi et al., 2009), and externally against skin depurative such as eczemas, sores and pimples (De Feo, 2003) as well as antimicrobial agent (Khare, 2007). Moreover, the plant is also used in astringent, diuretic, spasmolytic, whooping cough and roots in hemicranias (Khare, 2007). Leaves and flowers are used in decoction, fever, relaxant and kidney problems (Vicente et al., 2007) and also as an antipyretic (De Feo, 2003). Schmidt et al. (2009), reported that this plant possessed anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and apoptotic activities and also has very low antioxidant activity (Cai et al., 2003). So far, the phytochemicals constituent identified in the leaves are 21,5-Dimethoxy-6,7-(methylenedioxy)-isoflavone; acylated betacyanins (Vašinová et al., 2004; Cai et al,. 2005), iresinin I (acylated amaranthine)and its C15 -epimer iresinin II (Cai et al., 2001).

A water-soluble oligosaccharide composing of six glucose and three mannose units, has been isolated from the roots of I. herbstii which enhanced the immune response and prolonged the survival time of mice bearing Ehrlich carcinoma. Also the roots contain free oleanolic acid and its saponins. An alcoholic extract of the root showed the presence of amino acids, steroids, tri-terpenoids, alkaloids and coumarins. The seeds also contain dachyranthin (Khare, 2007).

Different species of the genus Iresine are used in traditional medicine. It contains several bioactive substances and showed different biological activities and is used to treat various diseases. Leaves of I. diffusa are used to treat malaria (Céline et al., 2009). Red-coloured plants in the family Amaranthaceae are recognized as a rich source of diverse and unique betacyanins such as acetylated and non-acetylated betacyanins. Acylated betacyanins are available with the highest proportion in I. herbstii and Gomphrena globosa (Cai et al., 2001).

Constituent of viscous oil from I. celosia are sesquiterpene Iresine, tlatlancuayin, isoflavones carbohydrates and acid steroids glutapectique to its natural state. In these some substances are traditionally used in cytostatic anticancer (that can block cell division and forced to die). This acts on the permeability of the cell disease, and changes the bio-electric potential of the membrane carcinogen. The sesquiterpene Iresine is found in high concentration in the plant "herb of the Maya" and the properties include anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and antiseptic. Most terpenes are also substances with positive and stimulatory effect on the body in general. These substances are also able to shorten the menstrual period. Isoflavone tlatlancuayin has anti-oxidant, which captures free oxygen radicals, and contributes to cell renewal, and also a powerful antimicrobial agent (Alfonso and Guido, 1983).

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252720/
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. -Anaïs Nin
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Peonies Lilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters Winter Sowing
Bulbs Region: Canadian Garden Ideas: Master Level Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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CarolineScott
Feb 26, 2017 8:56 AM CST
WOW! Thanks for the info on Iresine herbstii--I have just started a few seedlings for use as an ornamental. But I like to hear the stories and applications of the plants which I grow. I won't remember all of this , but I will come back to read your post. Thanks for posting it.

And thanks for the reference site!

It looks as if Iresine has the potential to have many medical uses if researched properly.
[Last edited by CarolineScott - Feb 26, 2017 9:01 AM (+)]
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Name: Liz Shaw
Gilbert, AZ (Sunset Zone 13) (Zone 9a)
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LizDTM
Feb 26, 2017 8:36 PM CST
:welcome: I was excited to see that you use it for eczema, which I have on and off. I might have to grow some!
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. -Anaïs Nin

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