Ask a Question forum: Lily Bulbs

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pkf513
Jan 28, 2017 12:27 PM CST
I live in Cincinnati Oh, and Sam's is now selling oriental lily bulbs. if i should buy them this early how should I store them. I probably won't plant until April or the 1st part of May.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 28, 2017 1:09 PM CST
Welcome!

I would store them in a cool place until you are able to plant. I usually put bulbs in the produce drawer of my refrig. If you have a cool basement, that would work. The idea is to keep them cool (so they don't sprout prematurely) and dry (so they don't rot). You can leave them in the bags they came in from Sam's club.
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Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
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Leftwood
Jan 28, 2017 3:13 PM CST
Keep them in the refrigerator. These are not tropical bulbs. Even if your basement was 50°F (which is OK), the bulbs will fare much better at a near freezing temperature.


edited for spelling
[Last edited by Leftwood - Jan 28, 2017 9:20 PM (+)]
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Name: Lee-Roy
Bilzen, Belgium (Zone 8a)
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Arico
Jan 28, 2017 3:30 PM CST
Aren't lilies planted in autumn rather than spring?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 28, 2017 3:38 PM CST
Lilies are planted in the spring in the U.S. Is it different in Belgium?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Joshua
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Zone 10b)
Köppen Climate Zone Cfb
Region: Australia Bookworm Cat Lover Lilies Orchids Irises
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Australis
Jan 28, 2017 4:27 PM CST

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I think it depends on the zone you're in, Daisy.

In Australia the vast majority of bulbs start to become available in Autumn and there would be few places where you couldn't plant through winter.
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Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
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ctcarol
Jan 28, 2017 6:52 PM CST
What Joshua said. In So. Cal. we plant most bulbs in the fall. If they need winter chill, store in the fridge till early spring. I have lilies up now that have been in the ground for 4 or 5 years.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 28, 2017 7:28 PM CST
Well how odd is that? Smiling

Joshua and Carol: How do your lilies get enough chill hours to be happy?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
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ctcarol
Jan 28, 2017 7:41 PM CST
I think it depends on the variety. Most don't live long here, but I have two that continue to increase and come back every year, so far. Both of these are in amended, fast draining , slightly raised garden areas. The others I've planted never make it more than two or three years. That being said, we haven't had enough winter rain to rot them, but even the Asiatics have disappeared after three years, and they're supposed to grow here.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 28, 2017 7:49 PM CST
I tried growing them in CA (zone 8) and they were always gone (along with the tulips) after a year or two. They are awesome here in Reno. But its the chill factor.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Jan 28, 2017 8:44 PM CST
Yep! I tried tulips, crocus, Hyaciths the first year I lived here. I got over that in a hurry. Freezias and some Daffodils do fine here. I got interested in the lily forum back at DG, and decided to try some. Most only last a couple of years, but I do have those two that to fine. I really think it is the slightly raised beds with lots of pumice, though I did loose the Asiatics in those beds after a couple of years. If I dug them up and stored them in the fridge, they would probably be fine, but I'm not that dedicated.
Name: Joshua
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Zone 10b)
Köppen Climate Zone Cfb
Region: Australia Bookworm Cat Lover Lilies Orchids Irises
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Australis
Jan 28, 2017 9:02 PM CST

Moderator

It's my first year growing them in Melbourne, so I cannot really comment on the winter chill factor. Most of my bulbs came from the Dandenongs, Paul (vanozzi) or Tasmania and were planted early winter.

@vanozzi has a lot of experience growing them in Victoria, though, and may be able to comment on how long his Asiatics last.
Plant Authorities: Catalogue of Life (Species) --- International Cultivar Registration Authorities (Cultivars) --- RHS Orchid Register --- RHS Lilium Register
My Notes: Orchid Genera HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Traits HTML PDF --- Lilium Species Crosses HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Species Diagram
The current profile image is that of Iris 'Volcanic Glow'.
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Jan 28, 2017 9:06 PM CST
I does help to know someone with similar weather.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Jan 28, 2017 9:29 PM CST
The traditional rule for most all lilies is fall planting. But they can be planted (or transplanted) at other times if you know what you are doing. Lily bulbs planted in the fall need a cold treatment in the ground or in the fridge to sprout in the spring. Lily bulbs bought in the spring will have been precooled and are ready to sprout when planted.

For certain lilies that are marginally cold hard, like oriental lilies in zone 4, many prefer spring planting because the plant has the entire growing season to become established by fall. This assures the healthiest (thus most cold hardy) bulb to survive the ensuing winter.

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