Ask a Question forum: I Have No Idea What My Snake Plant Is Doing...Please Help!!!!

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jordannechapman
Jan 30, 2017 11:20 PM CST
Hi! This is my first post here! I'm in desperate need of assistance with my plant. I've had my snake plant for about two years. I'm a horrible person and haven't changed it's pot because I didn't want to kill it (I don't have a green thumb) and it seemed to be doing fine. Well today, I was looking at my plant which sits on the kitchen table in front of a window, and it has two different clusters of leaves that don't seem to be connected to the main plant. I gently pulled on the larger leaf cluster and the entire thing came out of the pot with no root attached! The leaves look extremely healthy with not a bit of yellow or dead parts on it so I'm really confused. Why doesn't it have a root? Is it dead? I'm going to repot it immediately tomorrow because I feel this is an emergency, but please give me input! Should in try propagating the separated leaf clusters that don't have roots?! HELP!
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Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
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kniphofia
Jan 30, 2017 11:53 PM CST
It looks like it has rotted, possibly due to overwatering. I would take the whole thing out of the pot and remove all the compost so you can take a look at the roots. Throw away any soft or damaged tissue (cut the root if necessary). When you are left with undamaged material repot it into fresh compost but don't water it for several days.
You don't give any information about where you are located. Is it winter there?

jordannechapman
Jan 31, 2017 12:19 AM CST
kniphofia said:It looks like it has rotted, possibly due to overwatering. I would take the whole thing out of the pot and remove all the compost so you can take a look at the roots. Throw away any soft or damaged tissue (cut the root if necessary). When you are left with undamaged material repot it into fresh compost but don't water it for several days.
You don't give any information about where you are located. Is it winter there?


Hi! Thank you for your reply! I am located in Northern Utah, US, and it is winter time here. I will definitely investigate the roots when I re-pot the plant tomorrow. Should I throw out the cluster of leaves that don't have seem to have a root then? :/

Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
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kniphofia
Jan 31, 2017 10:37 AM CST
You could try leaf cuttings, cut the leaves across and place the bottom cut end into some compost. You won't get the variegation, but the resulting plants if they put out roots and eventually leaves will be all green. Some guidance here. https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/...

I've had Sans do this in winter, they aren't growing in the cooler temperatures (I'm in the UK and all my plants are indoors), so it's important to cut back on watering.

Good luck and hope you can rescue something from your plant.
Name: Lin
Southeast Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
Jan 31, 2017 11:59 AM CST
Hi jordannechapman, Welcome!

I agree with the advice kniphofia/Sue has offered! I'd remove the plant from the container and check to see if the roots look healthy; cut away any dead and/or rotted roots and repot in a soil suitable for cactus and succulents. That part of your plant in the second photo does appear to have rot at the base. Is their a bit of thick stalk attached at the base, or is it just loose leaves? If there is viable stalk, you can leave it out for a day or two to allow it to dry out; sprinkling cinnamon on the base will help prevent fungal infection. Pot it in a small container, using a well draining potting soil suitable for cactus and don't water for awhile. Once roots are established, go light on watering, as Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata) are very drought tolerant plants and don't need a lot of water, especially during the winter months. As Sue mentioned, you can also take leaf cuttings and pot them up to create new plants.
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Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Jan 31, 2017 12:06 PM CST
Good information on how to root cuttings and/or leaf cuttings:
http://extension.missouri.edu/...
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