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AdriaanAntonduToit
Jan 31, 2017 3:27 PM CST
Dear reader

Will Edelweiss grow in South Africa?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 31, 2017 4:36 PM CST
Welcome!

Edelweiss is an Alpine plant. That means, at the very least, it needs to be buried in snow for part of the year. Also, Edelweiss needs a rocky, fast draining, alkaline soil and hates being rained on.

I have planted Edelweiss in the past but they only last a couple years. In my opinion, they aren't worth the effort.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Anna Z.
Monroe, WI
Charter ATP Member Greenhouse Cat Lover Raises cows Region: Wisconsin
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AnnaZ
Feb 2, 2017 6:18 AM CST
They like hostile growing conditions. Think The Alps......pretty hostile. Rolling on the floor laughing
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
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Leftwood
Feb 2, 2017 9:53 AM CST
I agree that Edelweiss is one of the more difficult alpines to grow at lower elevations, but it does not have to be buried in snow for part of the year to survive. Too much rain, and high heat and humidity in the summer is much more debilitating. Still, just mere survival doesn't mean Edelweiss is worth the effort. Unless you live in a climate similar to the Drakensburg, even if it does grow, I don't think you will be happy with the form.

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