Annuals forum: Ranunculus Tips??

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Shizuoka, Japan (Zone 9b)
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AshleyD
Feb 9, 2017 4:56 AM CST
So a neighbor who knows I like flowers stopped me to inform me that they had some new flowers at her shop.

I bought one called Ranunculus (ラナンキュラス) It is a red flower and really pretty. I did some research too and am really excited BUT also nervous. I've never grown an annual plant. I heard there are ways you can keep it going. How would I go about that?

Anyone else grow one of these? Any tips?

<3 Thanks
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Mar 26, 2017 12:56 AM CST
There are many plants that are annual in northern zones but perennial where they grow naturally. You could try simply bringing the plant indoors October-to-March under lights. For some, you can pot clippings over Winter.
Name: ZenMan
rural Kansas (Zone 5b)
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ZenMan
Mar 26, 2017 8:54 AM CST
Hi Ashley,

Yardenman is correct, that strictly speaking Ranunculus is not an annual, but is a perennial that is not hardy in colder zones.

Ranunculus asiaticus  is a geophyte. A geophyte is any species that forms modified plant organs for carbohydrate storage, including bulbs, corms, tubers, tuberous roots, rhizomes, and pseudobulbs. Many geophytes reproduce by the natural replication of their storage organs.

Ranunculus can have a tuberous root up to 1.5 feet (45 cm) long when mature. You could bring that indoors during the winter to keep it from freezing. You can grow Ranunculus from the tubers or from seeds. Growing them from seeds each year would be treating them like an annual. But the tuberous roots will be there in the Fall for the saving, if you are so inclined.

ZM
I tip my hat to you.
Name: Liz Shaw
Gilbert, AZ (Sunset Zone 13) (Zone 9a)
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LizDTM
Mar 26, 2017 9:46 PM CST
According to the Sunset Western Gardening book, you can take the tubers out of the soil and store them someplace cool over the winter. Then plant them again come spring.
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. -Anaïs Nin
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6a)
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Phenolic
Mar 26, 2017 11:24 PM CST
Ranunculus are probably perennial in your region, which you listed as rated USDA hardiness zone 9b, as ranunculus are rated for zones 8 to 11.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Mar 28, 2017 7:06 PM CST
Ashley : Welcome 😁
Ranunculus are annuals ! Plant them in late fall. They bloom in early spring. When weather gets warm, they will die back. Then, you need to, dig up croums/bulds, and store them in frig or somewhere cool, untill, late fall, to plant again.
If croums/bulbs are left in soil, most will rot.
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Shizuoka, Japan (Zone 9b)
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AshleyD
May 8, 2017 8:07 AM CST
So the weather turned warm and my Ranunculus are gone. But when I tried to dig up the bulbs there were none. Roots are still there though. So not too sure what to do o.o
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
May 8, 2017 12:54 PM CST
Thats strange Ashley ?😕?
The scorms arnt really big. They kind of look like the leg section of a miniature octopus. Those roots my be the scorms. Dig a few up and send a picture. 😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
May 9, 2017 4:06 AM CST
Oh jeez, I was thinking of Aruncus (goatsbeard). I am so sorry. I have those. My bad!
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6a)
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Phenolic
May 10, 2017 3:56 AM CST
AshleyD said:So the weather turned warm and my Ranunculus are gone. But when I tried to dig up the bulbs there were none. Roots are still there though. So not too sure what to do o.o


http://pacificbulbsociety.org/...

If you take a look* at the above picture by the Pacific Bulb Society you'll see that the "bulb" of Ranunculus looks like fleshy roots as opposed to a classical tulip bulb or daffodil bulb.

*Edit: Typo, oops!
[Last edited by Phenolic - May 11, 2017 1:42 PM (+)]
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