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Avatar for treeplease
Feb 11, 2017 11:35 AM CST

Hi, I'm a new homeowner and would like to ID a couple trees in my front yard (same type) before I trim them. I'm in the DFW area of Texas if that helps.

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Thanks!

More pics below, as requested (some dead leaves were the best I could do):

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Last edited by treeplease Feb 11, 2017 3:46 PM Icon for preview
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Feb 11, 2017 11:51 AM CST
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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Closeup of the buds, twigs, and stems (probably no leaves available) would help with absolute ID, but those look like a couple of Red Maple (Acer rubrum) trees to me.
Avatar for treeplease
Feb 11, 2017 3:47 PM CST

Vibernum, I added some additional pics to my original post
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Feb 11, 2017 6:32 PM CST
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
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Yes you did - thank you so much.

I had suggested a Maple, which will always have opposite arrangement of leaves, buds, twigs. Your new images clearly show a tree with alternate arrangement of buds. This is why this kind of information is most valuable when submitting images for identification.

The twig images - along with the leaves you've shown - make me think you have an Elm species of some sort. The trunk/bark is unlike elms that I'm familiar with here in the Ohio River valley, and other common landscape species in the Ulmus genus. Hopefully, you will receive some review/commentary from some of the many Texas gardeners who frequent this forum (like Dave, who is in charge)...
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Feb 11, 2017 6:44 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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I wonder if it could be Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia) ?
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Feb 12, 2017 9:27 AM CST
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia) should certainly be among the common elm species planted in the DFW area of Texas, but I imagine that there are others.

The bark character illustrated doesn't match any Lacebark Elm that I'm familiar with - which are mostly clonal selections with patchy colorful exfoliating bark that are planted in the Ohio River valley region. These could be examples of seedling Lacebark Elm trees, or some other small-leaved species entirely, that has this ridge/furrow bark character.

The color of the buds does not match another small-leaved species, Ulmus pumila, which typically has fat rounded blackish buds.

This could be one of many hybrid elm selections (NOT American Elm clones, which would have larger foliage) produced for tolerance of stressful urban conditions, which include such stellar performers as 'Triumph', 'Regal', 'Patriot', 'Prospector', 'Homestead', and 'Accolade'.

Here is a link to some interesting work on trialing these selections, and good descriptive information on several of these trees:

http://www.jfschmidt.com/elmtr...
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